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dd/mm/yyyy OR mm/dd/yyyy Watch

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    If the USA did (year/)month/day (i.e. put the year first when applicable) I'd understand, but the fact that they don't means their way is stupid. Either go up in size or down in size, don't jumble them up.
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    I think Brits are better suited to working in several units and methods of spelling things out. Perhaps better than Americans. We really don't use metric or imperial on a wide scale... We regularly flip between them. I can give weight in kg or lb, or st/lb (or Newtons, as it should be) and I can easily understand km and miles. I've heard Americans be like "what the hell is a millilitre?" (except, to them, it's milliliter). I am used to converting, purely because I took the time to learn the conversions. The same goes for temperature. I use the Kelvin, Centigrade and Fahrenheit scale with no real difficulty interpreting them.

    We live close to Europe, so their standards and customs get leaked onto us. Similarly, Canada uses both scales in different parts of the country.


    But the dd/mm/yy makes more sense because it's in the order of precision. A day is more precise than a month, and a month is more precise than a year. But mm/dd/yy makes no sense. It is like saying "500 metres + 10cm + 3km" to say "3.510km". We would use "10cm + 500 metres + 3km" to say the same thing. For some reason they just confuse the order of precision which makes no sense at all. However, I have no real preference over saying "The first of February" over "February the first". They mean the same thing.
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    If asked for your birthday do you tend to say

    August 3rd or 3rd of August

    (or whatever the date is)

    I would tend to say the former
    I would say the former too, but that's only because it has fewer syllables.

    I still think dd/mm/yyyy should be used in formal situations, but in informal conversation you would generally use mm/dd (like you exemplified) as opposed to dd/mm/yyyy.
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    (Original post by USRaphael)
    I think being 180cm tall and weighing 13stone, buying a pint of milk and 250g of peanuts from the Tesco 30m down the 3mile long road causes great confusion. :dontknow:
    I've never heard of anybody here who uses the metric system for height - everyone says 5'10, 6'2, etc. I'm pretty sure the USA/UK are the only countries to use it as well (as opposed to 178cm, 188cm, etc.) However yes, I really don't like using 'stone' for weight measurement.
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    (Original post by The Assassin)
    I've never heard of anybody here who uses the metric system for height - everyone says 5'10, 6'2, etc. I'm pretty sure the USA/UK are the only countries to use it as well (as opposed to 178cm, 188cm, etc.) However yes, I really don't like using 'stone' for weight measurement.
    People do use metric to measure the length of other things though. I've started using metric to measure my height because I'm trying to beat the imperial out of myself. Metric is just better in my opinion.

    Although I don't suppose I'll ever switch to metric for long distances and speed because that relies on the road signs switching over.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    People do use metric to measure the length of other things though. I've started using metric to measure my height because I'm trying to beat the imperial out of myself. Metric is just better in my opinion.

    Although I don't suppose I'll ever switch to metric for long distances and speed because that relies on the road signs switching over.
    Yeah I'm aware the use it for other stuff except height. Originally I used the metric system but nobody really understood >_>, so I had to go with feet/inches. Regardless, whenever someone does mention something like 6 foot 2 or 5'10, the metric number always appears in my head - I'm more used to that and I find it a lot better tbh.

    What do Americans use for lengths of other things? Still feet and inches? Yards?
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    dd/mm/yyyy

    My university when web pages are in Dutch has it dd/mm/yyyy but then when they change it to English they make it mm/dd/yyyy. So annoying.
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    I know it's annoying and I lived in the US for 6 years so when I came back to England it took some time to adjust, lol I remember my teacher handing back a test I did on October 22nd and she was like "tell me what kind of year has a 22nd month?". Either way from my experience in the US the people there do not plan on switching anytime soon nor do they have plans to adopt the metric system (although most educated Americans wish this would happen). If anything the US probably expects other countries to follow suit to their ill-considered date codex.

    and for the record I prefer: dd/mm/yy
    theres no need to fill in all four digits of a year unless some people still think it's 1913 and the first world war is looming ahead
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    Just drew this up
 
 
 
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