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Lying about degree grade on CV. Why I'm tempted. Watch

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    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
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    You know what you needed to do to have a good chance of getting on a decent Graduate program, get a 2:1. If you diluted your efforts by doing other learning etc when it simply isn't required at that stage then the fact you know what you need to do and then do the complete opposite is probably not a trait they would want.
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    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    Are you suggesting that everyone who gets less than a 2:1 simply puts 2:1 on their CV

    When you say "employers rarely check" what is this based on ... I only ask as I have been in the position of employing people and we always check
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    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    Except a large majority of people who get 2:1s have not spent their time squirreled away with their faces in a book, they have managed to do all the extra-curricular activities you speak of while managing to get a 2:1 or even 1sts. So your point really holds no weight whatsoever.
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    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    its not as hard to get a 2:1 though as you make out and in most unis even if you spent a week on coursework you'd still have plenty of weeks to do other things.
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    You do realise they can easily ask to see your certificate that says what classification you got?

    This plan fails on so many levels.
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    Lying about your GCSE grades will get you the sack, don't even think about lying about your degree. Employer's always check. You can still get on grad programs with top companies with a 2:2, but obviously that comes down to other factors and luck.
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    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.

    Its a risky game, but I guess you gotta think of the downside and upside.

    Downside: Lying on CV = criminal offence, & potentially deprive a more worthy candidate who played fair and actually worked and got a 2.1

    Upside: You get a good job with good pay & the chance of the good life.

    OP make your choice.
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    (Original post by ebam_uk)
    Its a risky game, but I guess you gotta think of the downside and

    Downside: Lying on CV = criminal offence, & potentially deprive a more worthy candidate who played fair and actually worked and got a 2.1

    Upside: You get a good job with good pay & the chance of the good life.

    OP make your choice.
    + the consideration that the upside only happens if you pass the interview / employer doesn't do a background check on your CV ( which most do ) so the chances of that upside working for you are significantly less than the chances of the downside occuring.
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    a) Most employers would ask for a transcript.

    b) The "2:2 is better than a 2:1 because it shows you have other skills blabla" thing is bullcrap. Your CV will provide that information, and if you are intelligent, you will be able to manage your time and balance work and extracurriculars.

    c)If you do this, let us know how it goes, it could be funny.
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    (Original post by Philbert)

    c)If you do this, let us know how it goes, it could be funny.
    Well it won't be amusing when the OP has to explain to future employers why they got the sack.
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    Well it won't be amusing when the OP has to explain to future employers why they got the sack.
    Not to him/her.
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    If employers don't check degrees, then why even do a degree? Everyone would just say they got a first from Oxbridge. Luckily they do check!
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    If you're applying for a job which doesn't check the credentials of your CV then it's not a job worth lying for.
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    (Original post by ForKicks)
    If employers don't check degrees, then why even do a degree? Everyone would just say they got a first from Oxbridge. Luckily they do check!
    Not mine, thank goodness. After my first from Oxbridge I did a PhD at Yalevard and no-one's ever picked me up on it.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    Not mine, thank goodness. After my first from Oxbridge I did a PhD at Yalevard and no-one's ever picked me up on it.
    Heh, you know what I meant
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    I have never had an interview where the employer didn't ask to check the certificates in order to validate the claims on the CV. Thus I am led to doubt your statement that employers don't check because personal experience tells me otherwise.

    Lying during a job application is a criminal offence under the Fraud Act 2006. Why risk potentially getting a criminal record? That's really going to boost your employment prospects isn't it when future employers see you are untrustworthy and of dishonest character.

    Fraud by false representation

    (1)A person is in breach of this section if he—
    (a)dishonestly makes a false representation, and
    (b)intends, by making the representation—
    (i)to make a gain for himself or another, or
    (ii)to cause loss to another or to expose another to a risk of loss.

    (2)A representation is false if—
    (a)it is untrue or misleading, and
    (b)the person making it knows that it is, or might be, untrue or misleading.

    (3)“Representation” means any representation as to fact or law, including a representation as to the state of mind of—
    (a)the person making the representation, or
    (b)any other person.

    (4)A representation may be express or implied.

    (5)For the purposes of this section a representation may be regarded as made if it (or anything implying it) is submitted in any form to any system or device designed to receive, convey or respond to communications (with or without human intervention).

    Fraud

    (1)A person is guilty of fraud if he is in breach of any of the sections listed in subsection (2) (which provide for different ways of committing the offence).

    (2)The sections are—
    (a)section 2 (fraud by false representation),
    (b)section 3 (fraud by failing to disclose information), and
    (c)section 4 (fraud by abuse of position).

    (3)A person who is guilty of fraud is liable—
    (a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum (or to both);
    (b)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or to a fine (or to both).

    (4)Subsection (3)(a) applies in relation to Northern Ireland as if the reference to 12 months were a reference to 6 months.

    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/35/section/1
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    If you lie and the employer finds out or anyone finds out and tells your employer they can sack you for gross misconduct with immediate effect. You would then be inelligible for JSA for 6 months and you would have no reference and have to explain all that to your new employer on top of either lying again or only having the 2:2.

    I wouldn't recommend it! Also if you are in a job involving risk, something goes wrong and there is financial loss or physical injury or damage you can be prosecuted.


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    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    This is a woman whose career and reputation was reduced to tatters 28 years after lying on her cv.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117760330348583547.html
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    I never put my "class" on my CV. I didn't know you were supposed to.

    That said, don't lie!

    You need to write a killer cover letter.
 
 
 
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