Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Lying about degree grade on CV. Why I'm tempted. Watch

    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    Isn't that like saying to an interviewer "I'm not academically able to do this job, but I can play tennis really well." ?

    Extra curriculars are nice to have as a bonus, but if you fail to meet the minimum standards in terms of qualifications you will struggle. It is unfair that people are ignored just because they have a 2.2 when they could have so much more to give and could arguably do a better job than someone with a 2.1, but if you don't make the grade there's got to be a cutting-off point somewhere. You're also assuming that people who get 2.1s or above don't do anything besides study throughout their degree, which isn't the case for many.

    Plenty of people pad out their CV to make themselves look better, but if you lie about something as clear-cut as your degree classification it's so easy to be caught out and it isn't worth the risk.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Many employers actually check your qualification certificates on your first day.

    Could be embarrassing.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    For a job to support my student life I'd lie on it to say I'd had certain experience elsewhere or tweek a grade or two but not for a long-term commitment.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Don't lie on CVs. It's gross misconduct for most employers, shows you're untrustworthy and at any moment you could get fired. Most people who think they lie on CVs just exaggerate the quality of their work experience; often they downplay their skills so much in their own heads that they're not really lying!

    I do understand that it's frustrating having a lower second class degree. I have a first but from the OU so sometimes I get treated the same way as you although I'm long past the point in my career where my degree matters now.

    The truth is you're unlikely to get onto a graduate scheme with a 2:2 or lower. Contrary to popular belief, that's been true for the last 10 years at least and has nothing to do with the global financial crisis. I remember many friends having the same issues as far back as 2003.

    The reality is you have to do the same as we did and take entry level positions in the same way as A-Level school leavers. At first, your degree will seem like a waste of time when you're slogging it in a call centre or keying in data but the value of the degree will prove itself in time. For example, I realised this when I had exemptions from 10 of the 16 ICSA exams. If you're good, you'll catch up the grad scheme employees in no time too. 10 years into my career and I'm well ahead of them.

    As a footnote, I understand it's hard to find permanent employment right now. It's frustrating, but you've got to find a way to use your time constructively.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    Prove it. When they find you out, they'll fire you.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ebam_uk)
    Its a risky game, but I guess you gotta think of the downside and upside.

    Downside: Lying on CV = criminal offence, & potentially deprive a more worthy candidate who played fair and actually worked and got a 2.1

    Upside: You get a good job with good pay & the chance of the good life.

    OP make your choice.

    I agree. As a personal opinion, I think I wouldn't lie on my CV because I know I couldn't be that clever (or shall I just say I am stupid=.=)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?
    Employers ALWAYS check. Ever heard of background checks?

    What if it's a mere 1% you ask? Well, tough ****. You have to draw the line somewhere.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    yolo
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If you messed up at university, then it's your problem and probably your fault. Don't lie. Liars are scum. You messed up, now take the consequences that you deserve.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AW1983)
    Don't lie on CVs. It's gross misconduct for most employers, shows you're untrustworthy and at any moment you could get fired. Most people who think they lie on CVs just exaggerate the quality of their work experience; often they downplay their skills so much in their own heads that they're not really lying!

    I do understand that it's frustrating having a lower second class degree. I have a first but from the OU so sometimes I get treated the same way as you although I'm long past the point in my career where my degree matters now.

    The truth is you're unlikely to get onto a graduate scheme with a 2:2 or lower. Contrary to popular belief, that's been true for the last 10 years at least and has nothing to do with the global financial crisis. I remember many friends having the same issues as far back as 2003.

    The reality is you have to do the same as we did and take entry level positions in the same way as A-Level school leavers. At first, your degree will seem like a waste of time when you're slogging it in a call centre or keying in data but the value of the degree will prove itself in time. For example, I realised this when I had exemptions from 10 of the 16 ICSA exams. If you're good, you'll catch up the grad scheme employees in no time too. 10 years into my career and I'm well ahead of them.

    As a footnote, I understand it's hard to find permanent employment right now. It's frustrating, but you've got to find a way to use your time constructively.
    Well said!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    To be honest with you, if you are doing research, they ask for a 2:1 for a reason. I think when people say that 50% of people lie on their CV, it's for smaller stuff like an extra GCSE or something like that, but not the major stuff. You would be crazy to attempt it - certain dismissal for gross misconduct and reduced career prospects.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AW1983)
    Don't lie on CVs. It's gross misconduct for most employers, shows you're untrustworthy and at any moment you could get fired. Most people who think they lie on CVs just exaggerate the quality of their work experience; often they downplay their skills so much in their own heads that they're not really lying!

    I do understand that it's frustrating having a lower second class degree. I have a first but from the OU so sometimes I get treated the same way as you although I'm long past the point in my career where my degree matters now.

    The truth is you're unlikely to get onto a graduate scheme with a 2:2 or lower. Contrary to popular belief, that's been true for the last 10 years at least and has nothing to do with the global financial crisis. I remember many friends having the same issues as far back as 2003.

    The reality is you have to do the same as we did and take entry level positions in the same way as A-Level school leavers. At first, your degree will seem like a waste of time when you're slogging it in a call centre or keying in data but the value of the degree will prove itself in time. For example, I realised this when I had exemptions from 10 of the 16 ICSA exams. If you're good, you'll catch up the grad scheme employees in no time too. 10 years into my career and I'm well ahead of them.

    As a footnote, I understand it's hard to find permanent employment right now. It's frustrating, but you've got to find a way to use your time constructively.
    Correct. Well said!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SpicyStrawberry)
    Extra curriculars are nice to have as a bonus, but if you fail to meet the minimum standards in terms of qualifications you will struggle. It is unfair that people are ignored just because they have a 2.2 when they could have so much more to give and could arguably do a better job than someone with a 2.1, but if you don't make the grade there's got to be a cutting-off point somewhere. You're also assuming that people who get 2.1s or above don't do anything besides study throughout their degree, which isn't the case for many.

    Plenty of people pad out their CV to make themselves look better, but if you lie about something as clear-cut as your degree classification it's so easy to be caught out and it isn't worth the risk.
    In fairness, extra-curriculars (and work experience) are quite important in the sense that you really need to have them to get through those tedious phone interviews and demonstrate your 'leadership' and 'communication' skills.

    The temptation really is to embellish your involvement in extra-curricular's and the role you played in projects/activities - it's far harder (nigh on impossible in some cases) to check and saying you 'led' a project is a lot more appealing than saying you played a minor role.

    I doubt many people are stupid enough to lie about their degree.

    I actually think degree classification should play a more important role in recruitment.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Teofilo)
    In fairness, extra-curriculars (and work experience) are quite important in the sense that you really need to have them to get through those tedious phone interviews and demonstrate your 'leadership' and 'communication' skills.

    The temptation really is to embellish your involvement in extra-curricular's and the role you played in projects/activities - it's far harder (nigh on impossible in some cases) to check and saying you 'led' a project is a lot more appealing than saying you played a minor role.

    I doubt many people are stupid enough to lie about their degree.

    I actually think degree classification should play a more important role in recruitment.
    I hope not, but the OP was tempted to do so and I was just advising him about how bad of an idea it would be!

    ECs like sports are nice to have as I say, but actual related work experience that demonstrates the skills you've mentioned would be more beneficial because it's easier to apply to the workplace, and people do tend to embellish this to make themselves sound better without outright lying, but something like a degree classification can be very easily proven to be fake so there's no point in the risk.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I can't lie on my real grade because it will not gonna help. Sooner or later they will fish me out.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I actually think degree classification should play a more important role in recruitment.
    I'm assuming you're not in recruitment and won't be able to articulate with sound reasoning why you think this!

    Recruitment is a sensitive business that has much higher priorities than what grades someone has. Grades are only important because so many firms these days receive thousands upon thousands of applications, thanks to the internet. Recruiters are inundated and cannot cope with the volume of applications and it is not cost effective to employ more people to wade through all the paper. It is an unsatisfactory state of affairs that grades have to be used as a filter, but it's the easiest data to use in a CV to automatically reject people that doesn't constitute discrimination.

    This state of affairs first led to grades being over-emphasised by candidates. This attitude then seeped into the minds of recruiters. That said, once you get past the auto-filters, many recruiters won't look at your grades. The good ones with psychometrically test you and interview you several times.

    What really matters to recruiters is that they get someone who is a good fit. That normally means recruiters choosing a likeness of themselves. This might be why some law firms are overflowing with arrogant pricks with plum accents who worry about what degree they got and where rather than how much law they know and how well they can apply it!

    Ultimately though, this recruitment pattern is doomed to failure. Good people succeed against the odds. I assume that's why over the last ten years I've seen more and more people leave my employer once their graduate scheme has finished and more and more people recruited from smaller firms. The recruitment approach assumes academics are king but in the real world, people skills are. The best people are those with both but critically the next best thing is people with social skills but not the academics and bottom of the pile are academics with no people skills.

    The only think keeping the system afloat today is the volume of candidates with the right grades in a tight market. 10 years ago, lots of people with the right grades got interviewed but my company preferred to retain vacancies than take on someone with no people skills. The same will apply now and it's important to remember it'll be people skills that matter in the interview once you jump the grade filters.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'd be far too paranoid to lie about something like that. Nothing wrong with a bit of exaggeration on a cv but I'm too much of a wimp to just lie.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Well you would certainly be screwed if your employer asked for an updated copy of your qualifications. To be honest what employer in there right mind would employ someone without checking that they are properly qualified for the job.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have just enrolled part time in Graduate School. My proffesion does not require a Graduate Degree but my company is willing to pay for it so I have decided to take advantage of the oppurtunity.My question is for people that have Graduate Degrees. How has your life changed since you recieved your degree? Do you make more money, have more job options, etc.? Are you glad you went to Grad school? Was it worth It?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I have *fun* trying to tell employers why I haven't got an honours degree. I am waiting for the uni to get the paperwork to prove it, (my course shut down). LOL I can almost see the people on the other end of the phone rolling their eyes at me.

    Now I have a MSc, research still wants the honours, is it doable when I have an MSc?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources

    Articles and guides:

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    CGI logo

    CGI is open for applications

    "Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Army logo

    The Army is recruiting now

    "With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Quick links:

    Unanswered career sector and employment threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.