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Lying about degree grade on CV. Why I'm tempted. Watch

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    just don't put the grade on your CV, subject BA/Sc/eng (hons) is all you need
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    (Original post by Eljamaispa)
    I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

    People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

    50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

    In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
    You'd be surprised!
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    No, they will DEFINITELY check to see if you've got your 2.1 lol.. they will be a bit daft if they trusted you just by a bit of paper won't they? I guess you can lie in the initial process saying youve got or expected a 2.1 etc etc but when it comes down after the interview should you receive a offer, all the usual academic records gets checked.
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    You could lie on your CV, get the first job in your desired field, then leave the grade of your CV. No one will care after 10 years exp. Anyway degrees are worthless
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    (Original post by Zero 1)
    just don't put the grade on your CV, subject BA/Sc/eng (hons) is all you need
    Evidence for this? Surely if they ask for a 2.1, they're going to want to see clear evidence on the CV of that, I doubt employers are dumb enough to simply accept BA/Sc/eng (hons) and just assume this means a 2.1:rolleyes:
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    I've worked for REED Specialist Recruitment for about three months before and you would be surprised at how little (for some roles) they care about a 2.2. The most important thing is experience, RFL (reason for leaving), availability and personality. Obviously this depends on what you want to get into, so maybe you should specify that first. If you're looking for a normal, average paying job, you're not at much of a disadvantage.
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    lol, of course jobs will check your degree certification
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    (Original post by Olie)
    Evidence for this? Surely if they ask for a 2.1, they're going to want to see clear evidence on the CV of that, I doubt employers are dumb enough to simply accept BA/Sc/eng (hons) and just assume this means a 2.1:rolleyes:
    I had no problem applying to jobs that ask for a 2:1 using my CV that does not mention my degree classification. If the job requests a 2:1, then it's a given that if you are applying you have, or are predicted to get, a 2:1.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I had no problem applying to jobs that ask for a 2:1 using my CV that does not mention my degree classification. If the job requests a 2:1, then it's a given that if you are applying you have, or are predicted to get, a 2:1.
    Fair enough, but this thread shows that it isn't necessarily a given that someone has a 2.1, like already said it wouldn't be worth the risk if you didn't have a 2.1, wasn't there a story about a woman who got fired (or it might of been worse, I can't quite remember) for lying about her degree or something on her CV quite recently?

    Edit: Though they must have seen some sort of proof from you that you had what you say you had on your CV, otherwise what's stopping people just making up an entire degree on their CV if not?
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      Don't even bother lying about your degree classification. More and more employers are asking for proof of qualifications, & if you get caught lying, you're sacked before you even start the job!

      A friend of mine got a 2:2, & since graduating, she's had no trouble whatsoever getting a job (she now works in the Police). Whereas I got a 2:1, & 3yrs later, I still can't get a full time job!!!

      My advice - keep at it, apply yourself, and you'll get a job. Just don't lie!!!


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      Has nobody considered what would happen here if this all worked and you got into the job role?

      The people who managed a 2:2 or a 2:1 on my course at my uni, as lovely as they all are, just wouldn't hack it. Honestly, it just wouldn't happen. I can tell you that with confidence because I used to teach my peers in workshops and tutorials and I know their learning styles and what we could all do.

      The harsh reality of the current grading system is that candidates with firsts and 2:1's have shown they are able. If you got a low 2:2 in Engineering, say, ****ed about for 3 years, didn't bother in your modules, and then went for a job as an engineer for BP or whatever on their high flyer graduate program, where everyone else has a first from top 10 unis... do you really think you'd be okay with it and you'd handle the workload?

      Seriously, being dishonest in an interview can land you in **** later. Go in, be true to yourself and be proud of what you've done. Show them what you're made of, and sell yourself as you are. That's the key to an interview, and then a successful career... not just creating lies.
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      (Original post by Olie)
      Fair enough, but this thread shows that it isn't necessarily a given that someone has a 2.1, like already said it wouldn't be worth the risk if you didn't have a 2.1, wasn't there a story about a woman who got fired (or it might of been worse, I can't quite remember) for lying about her degree or something on her CV quite recently?

      Edit: Though they must have seen some sort of proof from you that you had what you say you had on your CV, otherwise what's stopping people just making up an entire degree on their CV if not?
      You are right, lying is absolutely not worth it. It can come back to bite you, even many years down the line. But, if they don't ask for a specific grade but you feel your third or 2:2 harms your CV you are under no obligation to have it on.

      Usually they won't ask for any sort of proof of qualifications until you have the job offer, where they will then do a full background check (such as also checking your previous employment, other qualifications etc.). That's what's stopping people lying.

      (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
      Has nobody considered what would happen here if this all worked and you got into the job role?

      The people who managed a 2:2 or a 2:1 on my course at my uni, as lovely as they all are, just wouldn't hack it. Honestly, it just wouldn't happen. I can tell you that with confidence because I used to teach my peers in workshops and tutorials and I know their learning styles and what we could all do.

      The harsh reality of the current grading system is that candidates with firsts and 2:1's have shown they are able. If you got a low 2:2 in Engineering, say, ****ed about for 3 years, didn't bother in your modules, and then went for a job as an engineer for BP or whatever on their high flyer graduate program, where everyone else has a first from top 10 unis... do you really think you'd be okay with it and you'd handle the workload?

      Seriously, being dishonest in an interview can land you in **** later. Go in, be true to yourself and be proud of what you've done. Show them what you're made of, and sell yourself as you are. That's the key to an interview, and then a successful career... not just creating lies.
      Your degree class shows how able you were at the content in your degree but this does not necessarily reflect how well you will perform on an actual job.

      To look into your example, you wouldn't be able to apply to BP if you only got a 2:2 (or even a 3rd) in your engineering degree but you could still end up getting a job with a contractor, where you will be doing some actual engineering, like design or analysis or making various bits of equipment, which is definitely more technically challenging. The 2:1 requirement is mainly a way to filter out candidates, not because 2:2 candidates are inherently less able (some are but some aren't, especially on courses where students are graded against each other and hence only a limited amount can actually get a 2:1 or above) hence why they're more common with bigger companies who get thousands of applicants (e.g. BP) than smaller ones that don't get as many, or maybe heavily restrict the pool they recruit from (e.g. the contractors that do all of the engineering for BP), even if said companies do work that is more demanding.

      And what about when someone gets a job that isn't related to their degree, which is in fact extremely common? If someone studied French or chemistry, does an accounting firm really care how much French or chemistry they know?

      You could argue that a 2:2 shows that a student perhaps doesn't have the best work ethic, and I'd agree in most cases, which puts employers off them. But I think that overall admissions tutors do a good job of not admitting students who would genuinely struggle to get even a 2:2 if they were to work as hard as the 1sts.
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      (Original post by Smack)
      I had no problem applying to jobs that ask for a 2:1 using my CV that does not mention my degree classification. If the job requests a 2:1, then it's a given that if you are applying you have, or are predicted to get, a 2:1.
      I would strongly dispute that. I don't know about the industry you're working in, but in the highly competitive city jobs namely law, consulting and financial services, you would be immediately rejected.


      It the job requests a 2:1 it is not necessary a given. HR could just as easily suspect that you haven't included it on your CV because you haven't got a 2:1 or better.

      I would hazard a guess you were lucky in the applications you made which passed the first stage for not including your degree classification.

      If you haven't got a 2:1 and it is required then you shouldn't include it on your CV. But if you do have one, it's very silly to not include it on your CV.
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      "Interest in practical learning and extra curricular activities"

      What a great way of saying you didn't work hard enough at your degree.
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      Don't lie about it, spend more time looking for opportunities that don't require a 2:1 - you're playing a game to their rules if you do and you'll go round in circles. Step back outside this and look for your own opportunities away from traditional gradschemes and put the ball back in your court. On a wider point here, I do think it is a real shame that so many employers seek to distinguish candidates on the basis of their degree classification. I for one barely look at it when recruiting, as from experience it tells me very little.
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      (Original post by Smack)
      The 2:1 requirement is mainly a way to filter out candidates, not because 2:2 candidates are inherently less able (some are but some aren't, especially on courses where students are graded against each other and hence only a limited amount can actually get a 2:1 or above).
      Surely an individual is inherently less able if they've been graded directly against their classmates and have achieved a lower standard?
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      (Original post by playingcards)
      Surely an individual is inherently less able if they've been graded directly against their classmates and have achieved a lower standard?
      But not necessarily less able than everyone, from all universities, with a 2:1.
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      (Original post by Eljamaispa)
      Employers rarely check.
      Mine certainly did.

      Unless you fake the transcript and stamp that is.
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      (Original post by nulli tertius)
      This is a woman whose career and reputation was reduced to tatters 28 years after lying on her cv.

      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117760330348583547.html
      This guy became a cabinet MP:
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pre...t_ids_cv.shtml
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      (Original post by Eljamaispa)
      I've noticed when researching graduate jobs the minimum required degree class is almost always a 2:1. People who achieve a 2:2 or less say how difficult it is to even get a phone call. The recruitment process in this country is disgustingly convoluted.

      People who have done nothing but study throughout their lives get the prize yet those who have more interest in practical learning and extracurricular activities and thus have a comparably more valuable skill-set outside of the academic world but happen to miss out on a 2:1 are ignored. Their CVs go straight to the bin.

      50% of people lie on their CV according to the book Freakonomics. What's to stop someone who equally deserves the job as a candidate with a better degree class, has a great skill-set but has a 2:2 to bump up their grade? Employers rarely check. What if it's a mere 1% they've lost out by?

      In some cases I don't think I could judge someone negatively that did lie about it.
      Mate, when people lie on their C.V. it's along the lines of 'I am a strong team player etc' when they aren't.

      Lying about your degree is going to make you look bad, they always check, my uni has a dedicated hotline where potential employers give your details like name and the uni replies with your classification.

      If you aren't happy with 2.2 have you thought about doing a masters? I know it can be pricey but it is a way of making your 2.2 look better, other than that you kind of have to accept that grad schemes won't consider anyone with a 2.2 regardless of your extra activities, especially in the current economic situation.
     
     
     
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