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    Is it a part time job whilst you are studying, or is this you trying to live in the real world and trying to make your career out of it?
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    (Original post by Michaelj)
    You can get a reference and I think by law they can't give a bad reference. But realistically speaking if you quit or get fired WOULD you ask for one? I think you should stick with this job for 3 weeks and look for a new one in the mean time. That way you have incoming funds for a while.

    Btw, do you mean going on shift with your coat and bag? Because if you get fired for that then it's a retarded reason and they're prob looking for reasons to fire people..
    They can't give a dishonest reference. They would be perfectly allowed to say that OP quit just prior to a disciplinary hearing, as it would be true.
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    (Original post by samjj8)
    Is it a part time job whilst you are studying, or is this you trying to live in the real world and trying to make your career out of it?
    just part time but having gross misconduct following me around will probably stop me getting any other job anyway.. i'll just see what they say, (or try and delay it for a while ugh
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    (Original post by Palatial Veranda)
    Bit of a pathetic reason to fire you.

    If I were you I would wait and if I did get fired I would have a good opportunity to completely lay into the person firing me. Even if it was gross misconduct, I would still find a way to lay into them. In fact, don't quit or wait to be fired. Lay into them on your next shift. No, in fact no, ring them now and lay into them.
    It isn't pathetic. It is to stop the staff 'stealing' time, so that it appears that they were not late to their sihift and to stop them being paid when they are getting themselves ready instead of doing their actual job.
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    (Original post by gupta-mhm-mhm-mhm)
    So I did something (clocking in with my belongings) and it was apparently gross misconduct, now I have a meeting in a few weeks, the disciplinary hearing. But should I just quit before so that if I am fired I won't have to have this on my record or in my reference?
    I had no idea this was such a bad thing and keep kicking myself, do you think they will definitely fire me because I am ridiculously remorseful about it :/
    Quitting now won't help you with a reference. The employer can still say there was a disciplinary hearing outstanding when you left them - because that is a fact, and a reference can say anything that is factually correct. Indeed, strictly speaking, as a reference has to be honest, if an employer failed to mention in a reference that you had a disciplinary hearing due, and you then went on and had disciplinary issues at the next company, they could take legal action against your previous employer for not disclosing material facts.

    So the tl;dr of that is that your reference was on dodgy ground the moment you clocked in incorrectly.

    So now you are in that situation, you might as well go ahead with the disciplinary interview. The best result is that they believe you just made a noob mistake, they bend your ear about it and you leave the room knowing that you've had your final chance.

    Worst case, they'll fire you and you probably won't be able to use this job for a reference, and therefore will probably have to leave it off your CV.

    Ignore the teenagers drivelling on about your rights, taking a lawyer with you etc. You signed a contract, you had a handbook, you defrauded the company. You just have to hope they keep things in perspective given your youth and lack of common sense.
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    (Original post by gupta-mhm-mhm-mhm)
    just part time but having gross misconduct following me around will probably stop me getting any other job anyway.. i'll just see what they say, (or try and delay it for a while ugh
    Just don't tell your next employer about it and get references from school/college/uni/family/a family or friend to pretend you work in a business they own.

    Edit: Also, go to the hearing, they will probably just give you a final warning rather than sack you. Next time don't try and steal from the company and you will be fine :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Mess.)
    It isn't pathetic. It is to stop the staff 'stealing' time, so that it appears that they were not late to their sihift and to stop them being paid when they are getting themselves ready instead of doing their actual job.
    Surely the fact she turned up on time is all that matters? How is she stealing time exactly? It is a pathetic reason.
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    (Original post by gupta-mhm-mhm-mhm)
    like clocking into my shift with my coat and bag before going to the locker because i was going to be late
    That souns like the dumbest thing that I've ever heard. I'm honestly perplexed as to why this is considered to be even a slightly bad thing? Also, surely your locker and the place that you clock in aren't so far apart so even if this ridiculous rule was something they really stood by, you'd only have been late by about 2/3 minutes?
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    (Original post by Michaelj)
    Surely the fact she turned up on time is all that matters? How is she stealing time exactly? It is a pathetic reason.
    She never turned up on time. She was clocking in still in her outdoor clothes and not ready for work. Therefore if she has clocked in to say that she is currently working and is infact not working but putting her clothes away then she is being paid for non-work reasons, essentially getting her wages from the company on a fraudulent basis.

    Being on time does not equal clocking in on time. Being on time is having your personal belongings away and then clocking in on time.
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    (Original post by theonefrombrum)
    That souns like the dumbest thing that I've ever heard. I'm honestly perplexed as to why this is considered to be even a slightly bad thing? Also, surely your locker and the place that you clock in aren't so far apart so even if this ridiculous rule was something they really stood by, you'd only have been late by about 2/3 minutes?
    If a company has ~500 employees and each one clocks in 5 minutes before they are actually ready to work then it could cost them £257 a day. It is also not unfeasible for this to take place as when I worked in retail from 16-23, every company that didn't have the above policy had most of the staff abusing it as the OP did.

    Further to that a lot of companies only pay in 15 minute increments rather than for every minute you work, which could end up costing the company (in the example above) £773 a day.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Quitting now won't help you with a reference. The employer can still say there was a disciplinary hearing outstanding when you left them - because that is a fact, and a reference can say anything that is factually correct. Indeed, strictly speaking, as a reference has to be honest, if an employer failed to mention in a reference that you had a disciplinary hearing due, and you then went on and had disciplinary issues at the next company, they could take legal action against your previous employer for not disclosing material facts.

    So the tl;dr of that is that your reference was on dodgy ground the moment you clocked in incorrectly.

    So now you are in that situation, you might as well go ahead with the disciplinary interview. The best result is that they believe you just made a noob mistake, they bend your ear about it and you leave the room knowing that you've had your final chance.

    Worst case, they'll fire you and you probably won't be able to use this job for a reference, and therefore will probably have to leave it off your CV.

    Ignore the teenagers drivelling on about your rights, taking a lawyer with you etc. You signed a contract, you had a handbook, you defrauded the company. You just have to hope they keep things in perspective given your youth and lack of common sense.
    Teenagers? Are you ****ing serious? We all know what we're talking about because of life experience, is she gets fired for that then it's unfair dismismal whether it was in the handbook or not. If a rule in the handbook said: "employees are not allowed to sneeze" and you got fired for it, it wouldn't stick well, would it? She brought a coat and bag on shift, it's not like she racially abused the manager whilst getting banged over the table during her shift.

    My mother got unfair dismissmal and won it in a court case. She was fired, I can't remember the reason but for a stupid reason with no previous disciplinaries.
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    (Original post by Mess.)
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    I absolutely agree with what Mess is saying here. She did not turn up on time and she knew she was going to be late, to knowingly clock in when you aren't yet ready for work is what is wrong; not receiving a warning for doing so. People like this annoy me, they are normally the reason I am waiting to be relieved of my station at the end of my shift because of their failure to manage their own time properly.
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    (Original post by Michaelj)
    Teenagers? Are you ****ing serious? We all know what we're talking about because of life experience, is she gets fired for that then it's unfair dismismal whether it was in the handbook or not. If a rule in the handbook said: "employees are not allowed to sneeze" and you got fired for it, it wouldn't stick well, would it? She brought a coat and bag on shift, it's not like she racially abused the manager whilst getting banged over the table during her shift.
    The argument and extension of the rule would be 'employees cannot leave the shop floor during shift hours except with the permission of a supervisor'. Which is an acceptable rule and grounds for gross misconduct as this leaves the shop floor a person down and more open to a person being able to steal items from the shop floor undetected.
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    (Original post by gupta-mhm-mhm-mhm)
    They talked to me before and wrote down what I said (i was sorry etc) and they said something about possibly being called for a hearing so does having the hearing just means they will fire me? I thought I was allowed to 'make my last plea' as it were, in this thing, are they allowed to make a final decision before hearing me out again?
    I'm not completely sure but if there is a hearing you should be able to give your side of the argument too. Really they should have given you a warning :/ but i think now you shouldn't quit. If there is a hearing attend it and hope you get let off with a warning. And if they do fire you and you apply for other jobs, you don't have to put them down as a reference. good luck

    and just out of interest how did they catch you doing this? through cctv?
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Quitting now won't help you with a reference. The employer can still say there was a disciplinary hearing outstanding when you left them - because that is a fact, and a reference can say anything that is factually correct. Indeed, strictly speaking, as a reference has to be honest, if an employer failed to mention in a reference that you had a disciplinary hearing due, and you then went on and had disciplinary issues at the next company, they could take legal action against your previous employer for not disclosing material facts.

    So the tl;dr of that is that your reference was on dodgy ground the moment you clocked in incorrectly.

    So now you are in that situation, you might as well go ahead with the disciplinary interview. The best result is that they believe you just made a noob mistake, they bend your ear about it and you leave the room knowing that you've had your final chance.

    Worst case, they'll fire you and you probably won't be able to use this job for a reference, and therefore will probably have to leave it off your CV.

    Ignore the teenagers drivelling on about your rights, taking a lawyer with you etc. You signed a contract, you had a handbook, you defrauded the company. You just have to hope they keep things in perspective given your youth and lack of common sense.

    (Original post by Mess.)
    Just don't tell your next employer about it and get references from school/college/uni/family/a family or friend to pretend you work in a business they own.

    Edit: Also, go to the hearing, they will probably just give you a final warning rather than sack you. Next time don't try and steal from the company and you will be fine :dontknow:
    Yeah I'm going to go to the hearing, no point making it more complicated than it is, and whatever happens happens.

    (Original post by theonefrombrum)
    That souns like the dumbest thing that I've ever heard. I'm honestly perplexed as to why this is considered to be even a slightly bad thing? Also, surely your locker and the place that you clock in aren't so far apart so even if this ridiculous rule was something they really stood by, you'd only have been late by about 2/3 minutes?
    Not very close there's loads of floors, it was stupid of me anyway I should of just been late but there you go, mistakes and lessons etc..


    Thanks everyone for all your help/reassurance, feel calmer about it now and just going to go to the hearing, say what I have to say and hear what they say, and see what happens.
    Probably won't have anyone with me (maybe a parent or s/t so there's an outsider in case they try anything because I'm 'young' or whatever) but anyway thanks and we'll see what happens!
    At least if I get fired i can go be a rockstar instead
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    (Original post by gupta-mhm-mhm-mhm)
    Yeah I'm going to go to the hearing, no point making it more complicated than it is, and whatever happens happens.



    Not very close there's loads of floors, it was stupid of me anyway I should of just been late but there you go, mistakes and lessons etc..


    Thanks everyone for all your help/reassurance, feel calmer about it now and just going to go to the hearing, say what I have to say and hear what they say, and see what happens.
    Probably won't have anyone with me (maybe a parent or s/t so there's an outsider in case they try anything because I'm 'young' or whatever) but anyway thanks and we'll see what happens!
    At least if I get fired i can go be a rockstar instead
    Do not take a parent or anyone else with you and especially not into the room :lolwut:

    You are in the working world now, you are an adult, stand on your own two feet, be honest, apologise and explain to them that it was a mistake and you did it in a moment of panic.

    If they shout at you then try not to do anything daft like cry and especially don't shout back at them.
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    If they class it as gross misconduct, quitting won't prevent it from appearing on any reference you ask for.

    However in reality I imagine you'll just get a slap on the wrist. They won't fire you over this IMO, would be nonsensical. Also, why wait several weeks?
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    (Original post by Mess.)
    Do not take a parent or anyone else with you and especially not into the room :lolwut:

    You are in the working world now, you are an adult, stand on your own two feet, be honest, apologise and explain to them that it was a mistake and you did it in a moment of panic.

    If they shout at you then try not to do anything daft like cry and especially don't shout back at them.

    Also, you can only take in someone who is a union rep for the union you are with (if any) or a work mate.
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    Are you under 18? If so i think you should take a parent or guardian with you. And just remain calm and be honest, you made a mistake and your sorry not much else you can do.
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    (Original post by Mess.)
    Do not take a parent or anyone else with you and especially not into the room :lolwut:

    You are in the working world now, you are an adult, stand on your own two feet, be honest, apologise and explain to them that it was a mistake and you did it in a moment of panic.

    If they shout at you then try not to do anything daft like cry and especially don't shout back at them.

    Well whatever don't think they'd want to come anyway haha, yes i intend to do that and no problems there I can handle shouting haha when did anything get solved by shouting back?


    (Original post by RaHiNa)
    Are you under 18? If so i think you should take a parent or guardian with you. And just remain calm and be honest, you made a mistake and your sorry not much else you can do.
    No and yep intend to
 
 
 
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