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    If I was to set up a home network (5 PCs, 1 Hub) and then use 1 as a host computer for a broadband connection would the host need to be always on for the others to access the net? or would the connection still be active?
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    thought so
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    Or you could just buy a router like we've got - you don't need an adsl modem then either: http://www.smc.com/index.cfm?sec=Pro...t&cat=4&site=c
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    Or you could just buy a router like we've got - you don't need an adsl modem then either: http://www.smc.com/index.cfm?sec=Pro...t&cat=4&site=c
    A router is by far the best way, not only do you get a more reliable always on conenction but it is also far more secure.
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    (Original post by stu673)
    If I was to set up a home network (5 PCs, 1 Hub) and then use 1 as a host computer for a broadband connection would the host need to be always on for the others to access the net? or would the connection still be active?
    Yes, and the host has to be connected all the time if you wish to access the net via the other computers on the network.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    A router is by far the best way, not only do you get a more reliable always on conenction but it is also far more secure.
    Although our cheapy one can't cope with allowing access to one of our fixed ip addresses from outside (ie we can't use it to set up a couple of the spare pcs as web servers )
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    yeah but the problem is hardly anyone sells a 5 port router, its almost unheard of & when it does happen they're proper expensive *poor student*. had a quick look at smc but all i see is 4 port again!
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    (Original post by stu673)
    yeah but the problem is hardly anyone sells a 5 port router, its almost unheard of & when it does happen they're proper expensive *poor student*. had a quick look at smc but all i see is 4 port again!
    If you've got a hub simply connect the hub to one of the ports on the router (although in the end we got better reults using a switch), our router is only connected directly (USB) to one PC for if it needs anything changing on it, the single port connects to the switch which is where the other PC are connected to.
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    You can buy 5 port routers from virtualy any computer shop, I bought mine for £45 a year ago and that includes an ADSL modem.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    You can buy 5 port routers from virtualy any computer shop, I bought mine for £45 a year ago and that includes an ADSL modem.
    Really? Where from!?! I need one!!!
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    Really? Where from!?! I need one!!!
    OK the £45 comes with virtualy no instructions but if you're familer with how the TCP/IP suite works and you no about generaly networking rules you should easily be able to get them to work.

    Microdirect (on upper brook street), Plannet Micro (on Manchester Road, Timperly (a bit far out though) both sell them for around £45.

    There is a new Aria opened on Oxford Road next to the university they will probably sell them.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    OK the £45 comes with virtualy no instructions but if you're familer with how the TCP/IP suite works and you no about generaly networking rules you should easily be able to get them to work.

    Microdirect (on upper brook street), Plannet Micro (on Manchester Road, Timperly (a bit far out though) both sell them for around £45.

    There is a new Aria opened on Oxford Road next to the university they will probably sell them.
    What is it called? I presume then, you mean OEM? A router+Modem you say? I have a router already and a seperate ASDL modem, I wanna share the connection but the modem is USB!!!! No! So I have to run all my clients through some cheapo proxy program.
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    What is it called? I presume then, you mean OEM? A router+Modem you say? I have a router already and a seperate ASDL modem, I wanna share the connection but the modem is USB!!!! No! So I have to run all my clients through some cheapo proxy program.
    USB modems are not worth bothering with they have a lot of problems with them. Ethernet modems are far better so for the £45 you may as well just get one box that does it all.

    This is the one I have

    http://www.planetmicro.co.uk/product...ckcode=M001413

    http://www.planetmicro.co.uk/product...ckcode=M001413
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    USB modems are not worth bothering with they have a lot of problems with them. Ethernet modems are far better so for the £45 you may as well just get one box that does it all.

    This is the one I have

    http://www.planetmicro.co.uk/product...ckcode=M001413

    http://www.planetmicro.co.uk/product...ckcode=M001413
    That's helpfull. I think that is the sort of thing that I am after.
    Might sound silly, but is it possible to use my ethernet network card to connect to my broadband?
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    Even if you have a 4 port router, you can use a network card to wirelessly connect the 5th computer.
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    That's helpfull. I think that is the sort of thing that I am after.
    Might sound silly, but is it possible to use my ethernet network card to connect to my broadband?
    Yes, your eithernet card will be connected to the router. The whole thing should be connected via ethernet and not USB.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Yes, your eithernet card will be connected to the router. The whole thing should be connected via ethernet and not USB.
    yup - the usb connection we have to the router is to change the internal settings of the router - not to connect to the internet....for that that PC has a network card plugged into the switch like all the other PCs (which seem to just keep growing in number on last count we had 17 - only 2 of which are actually used regularly)
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    yup - the usb connection we have to the router is to change the internal settings of the router - not to connect to the internet....for that that PC has a network card plugged into the switch like all the other PCs (which seem to just keep growing in number on last count we had 17 - only 2 of which are actually used regularly)
    Do you know you can change the settings of the router by typing in the ip address of it?

    i.e http://10.0.0.2 in my case, it will bring up a nice control panel you can change all the settings, this way you don't need to bother with any drivers or anything.
 
 
 

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