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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    There are times when i wonder if a proportion of the human race should be cast aside as scrap but my god there's a proportion which is truly wonderfully brilliant.

    Very interested in the potential anti-gravity from this which would have no end of economic benefits if it can be done cheaply.



    An excellent point though we have to remember that these people are the best of best usually and so if they think something is possible it usually is (kind of like one of Dragons hiring an inventer even though his products crap because eventually one of his ideas will be golden).
    Yes, not all science yields useful products for every day life, like theoretical physics, but the pursuit of knowledge is still valid. If a minority of researchers come up with something valuable enough that allows all the others to learn for the sake of furthering knowledge then that's fine by me. But sometimes you just don't know when science will be useful. If you take the the vortex loop model of the atom, it's a load of BS in terms of what really happens, but the theory itself was enough to establish knot theory and topology in mathematics. I'm not especially knowledgeable about either of those subjects but I'm pretty sure they have useful applications.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    We spent more bailing out the banks in 2011 than we have spent on British science EVER.

    Science is drastically underfunded, not the other way around.
    I know that; not entirely sure why you quoted me.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Thought you'd be interested. But fine, i'll un-quote you
    I just thought you might have confused me for a scientifically illiterate sceptic for a moment.
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    (Original post by Sgany)
    Temperature measures the level of energy in a molecule, they have made something have a negative level of energy. Absolute Zero = no energy at all.
    And so what does this mean for science and the thing with negative energy.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    We spent more bailing out the banks in 2011 than we have spent on British science EVER.

    Science is drastically underfunded, not the other way around.
    I agree with this however the British science industry is also one of the most efficient for this reason as well in terms of the public: private capital ratio.

    With that being said i would strongly support a few billion being set aside to allow say 10% funding of projects which need extra funding (maintain the effeciency but ensure that projects can go ahead).

    (Original post by Manitude)
    Yes, not all science yields useful products for every day life, like theoretical physics, but the pursuit of knowledge is still valid. If a minority of researchers come up with something valuable enough that allows all the others to learn for the sake of furthering knowledge then that's fine by me. But sometimes you just don't know when science will be useful. If you take the the vortex loop model of the atom, it's a load of BS in terms of what really happens, but the theory itself was enough to establish knot theory and topology in mathematics. I'm not especially knowledgeable about either of those subjects but I'm pretty sure they have useful applications.
    Whilst that's true many things can become useful. The warp drive for example is mathematically viable and has recently been further refined so that the anti-matter required would be only a relatively small amount.
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    (Original post by SophiaKeuning)
    And so what does this mean for science and the thing with negative energy.
    I'm an economist, not a physicist. I am just sharing the news, because no one else has.
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    (Original post by Sgany)
    I'm an economist, not a physicist. I am just sharing the news, because no one else has.
    Please do, it's great to hear.
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    I ****ing love science!
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    Well, screw it. There's no point studying for my thermofluids exam now! Haha!

    This is very interesting news though. I was under the impression that even at 0K (or as close to as humanly possible at the time) that subatomic particles would still move (like the electron), but there would be no vibration of the atom as a whole. Things get pretty odd the colder you get. Hopefully they don't change the definition of the Kelvin any time soon though.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)

    Whilst that's true many things can become useful. The warp drive for example is mathematically viable and has recently been further refined so that the anti-matter required would be only a relatively small amount.
    You mean the warp drive from Star Trek that is totally fictional BS?

    :rofl:
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    (Original post by Hooj)
    You mean the warp drive from Star Trek that is totally fictional BS?

    :rofl:
    The Alcubierre Drive.

    http://io9.com/5963263/how-nasa-will...rst-warp-drive

    Useless for the moment since we've only just begun trying to create anti-matter but incredible if realised.
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      I don't understand the article. If Absolute Zero is a state of absolutely no energy then how can something be less than that - surely negative energy (if that's the suggestion) is still energy.
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      (Original post by Sgany)
      .
      Normally, most particles have average or near-average energies, with only a few particles zipping around at higher energies. In theory, if the situation is reversed, with more particles having higher, rather than lower, energies, the plot would flip over and the sign of the temperature would change from a positive to a negative absolute temperature, explains Ulrich Schneider, a physicist at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany.
      Maybe it's just bad wording, but this doesn't make sense to me. If you 'reverse the situation, with more particle having higher, rather than lower, energies,' don't you just end up with a higher average temperature?
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      Amazing...science never fails to make me wonder
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      What? I had no idea this was possible! Wow!
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      (Original post by Sgany)
      Link to article
      "Exotic high-energy states that are hard to generate in the laboratory at positive temperatures become stable at negative absolute temperatures — “as though you can stand a pyramid on its head and not worry about it toppling over,” he notes — and so such techniques can allow these states to be studied in detail. “This may be a way to create new forms of matter in the laboratory,” Ketterle adds."
      I immediately thought of cold fusion - does anyone think this advancement may help with that in the future?
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      Yay, I think?

      I feel like Penny off The Big Bang Theory.
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      (Original post by VK96)
      I immediately thought of cold fusion - does anyone think this advancement may help with that in the future?
      I do wonder if this could make anti-matter stable.
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      (Original post by Cephalus)
      How amazing. Each day, science takes huge leaps.
      It's easy to make leaps when you are constantly wrong. It's like if I insisted London was in Wales then announced it was in England, wow! what a startling discovery.

      **** physicsts. They are always wrong then when they get something right they think they're clever. *******s

      When Mathematicians say something is true, they don't need to change their minds.
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      (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
      It's easy to make leaps when you are constantly wrong. It's like if I insisted London was in Wales then announced it was in England, wow! what a startling discovery.

      **** physicsts. They are always wrong then when they get something right they think they're clever. *******s

      When Mathematicians say something is true, they don't need to change their minds.
      Mathematicians have been changing their minds if Zero is actually a number for quite a while...
     
     
     
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