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    Hello Fitness Forum.

    So I've been doing a bit of research lately into how different rep speeds produce different results and came upon some enlightening conclusions. Fast reps overall tend to promote strength whereas slow reps promote muscle growth.

    I am firmly in the camp that wishes to promote strength (and speed) but the problem is when I lift heavy (my 6-8 rep max) I can't help but perform the reps slowly (simply due to the weight of them). Is this normal? Most articles I have looked at seem pretty adamant that people can lift very heavy quickly but I find that I am forced to lift slowly at the higher end of my weight range.

    Is there a solution? Should I lift lighter? I currently do 6-8 reps on most compound exercises...
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    If you are lifting for strength you really should be in the 1-5 rep range, 6-8 reps, especially when lifting heavy is too much. You can do fast/powerful lifting in the 5+ rep range but these should be at really light weights and should incorporate some bands or increasing resistance.

    Even when I'm on a lightweight power/speed day I'll only be lifting about 50% - 60% of my max depending on the resistance of the bands on the weights. But I'll still only rep max 3/4 reps and just take a shorter break between sets. Literally I'll go under the bar push out 3 fast powerful reps, 30 second break another 3 reps and another 3 second break etc. I'll do maybe 8 sets and take a 2/3 minute break halfway through.

    If it's a heavey day at 80% and above I'll do 3 reps and rest for at lest 2 and a half to 3 minutes between sets. That way every rep is a fast powerful rep with a high resistance encouraging maximum strength and power gains.

    So basically lower your repitions to maybe 6-8 sets of 3 reps at around 80-90% of your max and introduce some speed benching, squatting and deadlifting using resistance bands. Maybe even add some plylometircs in there. Leave the high reps slow movements for the body builders.
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    It all depends on what you mean by fast and slow.

    The average speed of 1 rep of an exercise should be around 2-3 seconds on the concentric phase and the same on the essentric phase. The slower you perform an exercise the more it will focus on the primary muscle being worked.

    Take the bicep curl for instance, if the exercise is controlled and your technique is good then the exercise will benefit the bicep massivly because it will contract more since there is more pressure and will be worked out better than a set that has been rushed.

    If however you are doing it quite fast then you have problems that can a rise, for example your technique will fall e.g your elbow wont be locked in place, your shoulder wont stabalise the movement and you also have other muscles coming into the bicep curl to help it out the bicep which shouldn't be happening at all.
    The faster you go the easyer it is, you see people at the gym lifting heavy weights but what they dont know is that moving really fast which promotes gravity to help them do most of the workout. Get them to slow down their movement and take gravity out of the equation and they will find it alot harder and will end up struggling. if they cant lower down and lift up for at least 2 seconds then its to heavy for them to be lifting in the first place which is just as bad as doing a chest press and only lowering half way down to the chest.
    Doing a set of 17.5kg for 10 reps for the count of 2 seconds up 2 down (at least) is much better than doing 22.5kg with 1 second up and just dropping it down as fast as possible, the essentric phase is to much to handle wont and wont benefit muscle growth.

    Doing a rep of an exercise for to long is also bad aswell say like max of 4 seconds up and 4 seconds down (might be pushing it abit but meh) because it just might be to heavy for lifting for x amount of reps and should lower the weight, aim for 2-3 seconds each phase and you should be fine and you will benefit more.


    Just stick to the basic and you will be fine.
    1-6 reps promotes strength
    6-12 promotes hypertrophy (muscle mass)
    and 12-20 promotes endurance and toning.
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    (Original post by Transformational)
    Fast reps overall tend to promote strength whereas slow reps promote muscle growth.
    This is beyond inaccurate. Because...

    (Original post by Transformational)
    when I lift heavy (my 6-8 rep max) I can't help but perform the reps slowly (simply due to the weight of them). Is this normal?
    There you have it.

    Whether someone can lift a %age of their 1RM faster than you is down to training specificity. If you squat for heavy singles and doubles, you'll get better at squatting heavy singles and doubles. If you're an OL'er, you get better at lifting ~50-70% explosively. If you do both, your neuromuscular system adapts accordingly in response to the nature of the external stress. There's no constructive question here.

    Lifting as fast as possible in any rep range is a more practical training principle. There is no exception to it, not even for muscular endurance or eccentric training.
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    For speed, combine low reps (say 5x5 methods) with explosive exercises. For example: alternate a set of 5 bench presses with a set of explosive clap pushups, or a set of 5 back weight exercises with a set of explosive pullups. As you get better at these bodyweight exercises you'll add weight to the exercises and eventually be able to increase the weight. You're correct that being able to lift heavier faster will make you stronger, but you need to start light and increase weight just like you do when you first start lifting! The above method is what is recommended by my rowing club for increasing strength.


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    (Original post by ambitioussp)
    It all depends on what you mean by fast and slow.

    The average speed of 1 rep of an exercise should be around 2-3 seconds on the concentric phase and the same on the essentric phase. The slower you perform an exercise the more it will focus on the primary muscle being worked.

    Take the bicep curl for instance, if the exercise is controlled and your technique is good then the exercise will benefit the bicep massivly because it will contract more since there is more pressure and will be worked out better than a set that has been rushed.

    If however you are doing it quite fast then you have problems that can a rise, for example your technique will fall e.g your elbow wont be locked in place, your shoulder wont stabalise the movement and you also have other muscles coming into the bicep curl to help it out the bicep which shouldn't be happening at all.
    The faster you go the easyer it is, you see people at the gym lifting heavy weights but what they dont know is that moving really fast which promotes gravity to help them do most of the workout. Get them to slow down their movement and take gravity out of the equation and they will find it alot harder and will end up struggling. if they cant lower down and lift up for at least 2 seconds then its to heavy for them to be lifting in the first place which is just as bad as doing a chest press and only lowering half way down to the chest.
    Doing a set of 17.5kg for 10 reps for the count of 2 seconds up 2 down (at least) is much better than doing 22.5kg with 1 second up and just dropping it down as fast as possible, the essentric phase is to much to handle wont and wont benefit muscle growth.

    Doing a rep of an exercise for to long is also bad aswell say like max of 4 seconds up and 4 seconds down (might be pushing it abit but meh) because it just might be to heavy for lifting for x amount of reps and should lower the weight, aim for 2-3 seconds each phase and you should be fine and you will benefit more.


    Just stick to the basic and you will be fine.
    1-6 reps promotes strength
    6-12 promotes hypertrophy (muscle mass)
    and 12-20 promotes endurance and toning.
    I'm not even going to go into what you said, but no this is wrong.
 
 
 
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