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drs use BMI but hip:waist meant to be better Watch

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    In biology we learnt that especially for muscular people, working out your hip to waist ratio was a better indication of if you're too fat or not, else people like rugby players or boxers come out as being obese, when they're clearly not fat, it their muscle making them heavier. And its clearly a lot healthier to be say 12 stone and really fit and muscular than 10 stone but all that weight is fat and you can't even jog 400 metres - which was true in my high school PE class for people - the heaviest person was the fittest because they played rugby and went to the gym, so most their weight was muscle.

    So why do doctors still only use BMI?

    Over the years doctors have worked out my BMI loads of times, but not once have they worked out my hip:waist.

    It's not like measuring your hips and waist takes a lot more time, effort and expensive equipment than weighing you.
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    (Original post by Clare~Bear)
    In biology we learnt that especially for muscular people, working out your hip to waist ratio was a better indication of if you're too fat or not, else people like rugby players or boxers come out as being obese, when they're clearly not fat, it their muscle making them heavier. And its clearly a lot healthier to be say 12 stone and really fit and muscular than 10 stone but all that weight is fat and you can't even jog 400 metres - which was true in my high school PE class for people - the heaviest person was the fittest because they played rugby and went to the gym, so most their weight was muscle.

    So why do doctors still only use BMI?

    Over the years doctors have worked out my BMI loads of times, but not once have they worked out my hip:waist.

    It's not like measuring your hips and waist takes a lot more time, effort and expensive equipment than weighing you.

    Unless you are an athlete with lots of muscle a doctor has no need to use a hip waist ratio measurement there is a large range of healthy bmis and the majority of people fit into them. Anbody can judge whether a large bmi is due to muscle or fat
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    (Original post by victoriajackson)
    Unless you are an athlete with lots of muscle a doctor has no need to use a hip waist ratio measurement there is a large range of healthy bmis and the majority of people fit into them. Anbody can judge whether a large bmi is due to muscle or fat
    What if you were fat and now you're exercising, so that you have a fair amount of muscle underneath a thin layer of fat? You would appear fat but you're actually fit which a fair amount of muscle. This can easily happen if you were fat and started exercises that built muscle rather than getting rid of fat.
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    (Original post by Clare~Bear)
    What if you were fat and now you're exercising, so that you have a fair amount of muscle underneath a thin layer of fat? You would appear fat but you're actually fit which a fair amount of muscle. This can easily happen if you were fat and started exercises that built muscle rather than getting rid of fat.
    If this where he case then your hip to waist ratio would still show you are overweight because muscle underneath woukd fatten out your waist. Plus you burn the fat in order to build muscle so if youve gained muscle youve lost fat. Everybody has a thin layer of fat to keep warm but if you start to build muscke uyou will burn the excess fat because its an energy source and with more muscles your body needs moree nergy therefore you lose the fat. Try it you canmeasure ityourself with online calculators usually bmi and hip to waist complement each othr its only in special cases that they dont. Sorry for the bad typing im on a tablet and cba correcting everythin haha
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    It's a decent approximation. Anyway, if you have health issues caused by your weight you'll probably know it's caused by your weight without needing some numbers to prove it.
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    (Original post by victoriajackson)
    If this where he case then your hip to waist ratio would still show you are overweight because muscle underneath woukd fatten out your waist. Plus you burn the fat in order to build muscle so if youve gained muscle youve lost fat. Everybody has a thin layer of fat to keep warm but if you start to build muscke uyou will burn the excess fat because its an energy source and with more muscles your body needs moree nergy therefore you lose the fat. Try it you canmeasure ityourself with online calculators usually bmi and hip to waist complement each othr its only in special cases that they dont. Sorry for the bad typing im on a tablet and cba correcting everythin haha

    (Original post by Rob da Mop)
    It's a decent approximation. Anyway, if you have health issues caused by your weight you'll probably know it's caused by your weight without needing some numbers to prove it.
    I've just got round to calculating my hip:ratio. It's 0.78 which according to the bbc is 'good'. But my BMI is overwight, borderline obese. But I'm no athlete.
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    (Original post by Clare~Bear)
    I've just got round to calculating my hip:ratio. It's 0.78 which according to the bbc is 'good'. But my BMI is overwight, borderline obese. But I'm no athlete.

    It also depends where you store your weight if you store it on your bum and thighs your hip to waist will be good but you will still tecnically be overweight. Also a hip to waist is mainly for measuring your risk of developing CHD women tend to store their weight on their hips so obviously this will reduce your measuremnt. Also your hip to waist ratio is only just under the concern point. Mine is 0.69 which ias apparently excellent but according to my BMI which is 14.5 im very underweight so neither of them are accurate individually. I think BMI is more poular because measuring somebodys hip to waist measurent is time consumning and it doesnt include weight stored in otber areas however hip:waist is becoming increasingly popular due to the fact that we have high kevels of CHD and obesity related diseases so it wont be mong before theyare bei g used together abyway, eat responsibly and exersices no formula can include everybody when people of the same height have diffeent frames you 'll be fine if you do that.
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    (Original post by victoriajackson)
    If this where he case then your hip to waist ratio would still show you are overweight because muscle underneath woukd fatten out your waist. Plus you burn the fat in order to build muscle so if youve gained muscle youve lost fat. Everybody has a thin layer of fat to keep warm but if you start to build muscke uyou will burn the excess fat because its an energy source and with more muscles your body needs moree nergy therefore you lose the fat. Try it you canmeasure ityourself with online calculators usually bmi and hip to waist complement each othr its only in special cases that they dont. Sorry for the bad typing im on a tablet and cba correcting everythin haha
    Not necessarily body builders let themselves get 'fat' during the year and they 'cut'. They'd appear to be visibly fat yet they'd have large amounts of muscle. So they don't burn the fat whilst gaining muscle.
    In fact the two things are different When I used to weight train I was told to have a high carb/protein diet when bulking and then low carb to cut.
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    Also consider how BMI is now accepted by the majority of the population, even those with no real interest in health and fitness. It gives a simple value that people can understand.

    Changing things now would just cause confusion, because like has been said above, anyone could look at a rugby player with an "obese" BMI and work out that they're healthy.
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    (Original post by clarusblue)
    Also consider how BMI is now accepted by the majority of the population, even those with no real interest in health and fitness. It gives a simple value that people can understand.

    Changing things now would just cause confusion, because like has been said above, anyone could look at a rugby player with an "obese" BMI and work out that they're healthy.
    According to the bbc (which I used for my hip:ratio guide) hip:ratio is being used more by doctors now.

    (Original post by victoriajackson)
    Also your hip to waist ratio is only just under the concern point. Mine is 0.69 which ias apparently excellent but according to my BMI which is 14.5 im very underweight so neither of them are accurate individually. I think BMI is more poular because measuring somebodys hip to waist measurent is time consumning and it doesnt include weight stored in otber areas however hip:waist is becoming increasingly popular due to the fact that we have high kevels of CHD and obesity related diseases so it wont be mong before theyare bei g used together abyway, eat responsibly and exersices no formula can include everybody when people of the same height have diffeent frames you 'll be fine if you do that.
    No it's not, going by the bbc guide anyway. It's good, nearly on the border with average, not on the border of high.
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    I hate BMI. I think it's bull****; everyone's bodies have a natural set point where they're "happiest" (set point theory) and yeah.

    My opinion before you all go scientific on me and prove me wrong :')
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    (Original post by reubenkinara)
    Not necessarily body builders let themselves get 'fat' during the year and they 'cut'. They'd appear to be visibly fat yet they'd have large amounts of muscle. So they don't burn the fat whilst gaining muscle.
    In fact the two things are different When I used to weight train I was told to have a high carb/protein diet when bulking and then low carb to cut.
    Yes but like you said they cut replacing the fat with muscle but the fat is put on over the top if exsisting muscle. They burn the fat as they build muscle. She is replacin the muscle with fat it happens simultaneously also she should be trimmer if she is doing this because muscle is more dense than fat.
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    (Original post by Clare~Bear)
    According to the bbc (which I used for my hip:ratio guide) hip:ratio is being used more by doctors now.



    No it's not, going by the bbc guide anyway. It's good, nearly on the border with average, not on the border of high.
    You cabt accept everything the BBC tells you as fact, where have they got that infornation from? Have they done a survey? What was the sample size what area? Also just becuase its average for this country doesnt necassarily mean its ok the average femal dress size is size 16 but that doesnt mean its ok. Your hip:waist ratio is just under 0.8 which is the concern point for many health organisations
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    (Original post by victoriajackson)
    You cabt accept everything the BBC tells you as fact, where have they got that infornation from? Have they done a survey? What was the sample size what area? Also just becuase its average for this country doesnt necassarily mean its ok the average femal dress size is size 16 but that doesnt mean its ok. Your hip:waist ratio is just under 0.8 which is the concern point for many health organisations
    The bbc gets their health info from the NHS I believe. How can 0.8 be just udner the concern point when she says' its good, but close to average. Surely average means it's a normal, healthyish kinda ratio? Not fat, not thin?

    Cut OP some slack, she's losing weight and isn't huge to start with, but your comments and those of others on her other threads aren't helping.
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    (Original post by anony.mouse)
    The bbc gets their health info from the NHS I believe. How can 0.8 be just udner the concern point when she says' its good, but close to average. Surely average means it's a normal, healthyish kinda ratio? Not fat, not thin?

    Cut OP some slack, she's losing weight and isn't huge to start with, but your comments and those of others on her other threads aren't helping.
    WHO STEPS states that abdominal obesity is defined as a waist–hip ratio above 0.90 for males and above 0.85 for females.
    The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) states that women with waist–hip ratios of more than 0.8 and men with more than 1.0, are at increased health risk because of their fat distribution. The majority of insitutes will say that having a hip:waist ratio of 0.8 or greater is bad. I'm not calling her for being fat, I simply answered the intital question of why they don't use hip:waist ratio. nobody said she was huge I've never seen her but her BMI and hip:waist ratio suggests she is overweight there is no point in glossing over it and saying she isn't because that isn't going to help her if she needs to lose weight.

    P.s. OP if you are trying to lose weight good luck with it.
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    (Original post by anony.mouse)
    The bbc gets their health info from the NHS I believe. How can 0.8 be just udner the concern point when she says' its good, but close to average. Surely average means it's a normal, healthyish kinda ratio? Not fat, not thin?

    Cut OP some slack, she's losing weight and isn't huge to start with, but your comments and those of others on her other threads aren't helping.
    oh and like I said on the average thing just because it's average doesn't mean its healthy if the average size was a sze sero would that be healthy? of course not
 
 
 
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