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Arduino for beginner watch

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    I had learnt C language programming and started to be interested in Arduino since its program is in C. So, where do I begin? There are so many types of Arduino! Buy the make magazine starter kit?


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    http://www.4tronix.co.uk/arduino/Super-Kit.php
    I got this kit for Christmas from my dad and I was a little sceptical at first but once I got into it I've really been enjoying it. I've had very little programming experience besides a bit of python for an engineering project I'm doing with a Raspberry Pi but I've been following the tutorials on here;
    http://www.ladyada.net/learn/arduino/index.html
    and so far I've made a program to do traffic lights and I'm working on something where I can type in a phrase and it outputs it to morse and then the LDR picks it up and decodes it back. It's good fun!
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    I'm very interested with this as well. I'm not sure if I can attach wires on the device though : / (I'm planning to attach wires on the LEDs to the device; is that possible?)
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    Do it need soldering skills? And I been hearing this Rasberry Pi... What is it?


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    (Original post by kka25)
    I'm very interested with this as well. I'm not sure if I can attach wires on the device though : / (I'm planning to attach wires on the LEDs to the device; is that possible?)
    The cables attach to what're called GPIO pins on the board which you configure

    'int ledPin = 13;'
    which tells the program what ledPin is

    'void setup()
    {
    pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
    }'
    which sets up the pin you configured as an output and then to turn it on you write a loop with the command digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH) and that sets the pin as high which lights the LED.

    One thing to bear in is that when you're lighting LEDs from the GPIO you should use a pull up resistor otherwise when you're lighting an LED you pretty much short the circuit and that can damage the board (I learnt the hard way with the Pi).


    (Original post by AdamHong)
    Do it need soldering skills? And I been hearing this Rasberry Pi... What is it?
    Instead of soldering, I'd recommend a breadboard as it's just hassle free and it's far easier reusing components as you can just pull them out and plug them back in where you like.

    And the Raspberry Pi is a little computer which runs Linux (an operating system like Windows or Mac OS) which you can use as a normal computer though it's not very powerful. I've been using one to make a tool for number plate recognition, it's more advanced than the Arduino micro-controllers but less versatile.
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    (Original post by SamHedges)
    The cables attach to what're called GPIO pins on the board which you configure

    'int ledPin = 13;'
    which tells the program what ledPin is

    'void setup()
    {
    pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
    }'
    which sets up the pin you configured as an output and then to turn it on you write a loop with the command digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH) and that sets the pin as high which lights the LED.

    One thing to bear in is that when you're lighting LEDs from the GPIO you should use a pull up resistor otherwise when you're lighting an LED you pretty much short the circuit and that can damage the board (I learnt the hard way with the Pi).

    .
    Is it like this: Red wires on board

    So I can attach any variations of red/black wires is it? As long as I want?

    What else you can do with the board? I'm using it mainly to make the LEDs blink; (my project is this basically; I want to have the LED blink effect)

    Any other tips? I don't want to damage the board since it's quite expensive :pinch:
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    You do realise that's a Raspberry Pi though? If you just want to blink LEDs then I'd recommend an Arduino, the software has a preset blink program so all you'd need to do would be to hook it up to a USB of 9V batter with it running?

    I can't think of anything else, I'd use transistors to make the LEDs brighter but I'm not sure if that would require pull up resistors or not..
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    (Original post by SamHedges)
    You do realise that's a Raspberry Pi though? If you just want to blink LEDs then I'd recommend an Arduino, the software has a preset blink program so all you'd need to do would be to hook it up to a USB of 9V batter with it running?

    I can't think of anything else, I'd use transistors to make the LEDs brighter but I'm not sure if that would require pull up resistors or not..
    Can I attach wires on the Arduino, to be connected to the LEDs?
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    I skipped the arduino step and went straight to AVR (arduino uses certain AVR chips and has other bits on board).

    I think a lot of the arduino boards have sets of headers you can connect things to. You can then use existing libraries to talk to other bits of electronics or manage the signals yourself in code.

    In terms of the device to buy that's likely to depend on the ports you require. Different types of device you want to connect up will have different requirements, LEDs and switches can usually use any IO pin, GPS modules usually require a serial port, other devices might require SPI etc. Some sensors might want an ADC channel.
 
 
 
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