How hard are the 3 sciences and maths at A level?

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3mma_gal96
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Hi, pretty self-explanatory, but I was thinking about taking Biol, Physics and Chemistry for definite at A level. I'm now in yr 11 and on my yr 10 summer exams, I achieved A* Biol, As for physics and Chemistry (1 mark of A*)
What is the transition like between gcse and A-level? Obviously I'll have to do a lot more work, but does it become incredibly stressful and hard?
Also, I was possibly considering maths, but it's not my best subject. Would this be not a wise move?
Any advice from older students please?

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Khurc003
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Hello... It feels like this question is specifically aimed at me because I was in the same situation as you last year this time and have taken exactly what you are considering! lol

Well, not different to what many people say... A levels are HARD.... not worth comparing to GCSE'S because they seem to small in front of A levels. Specially, if you're taking these subjects... First few weeks are a BIG push and then I think it's fine - not because it gets any easier or better but because you get used to it being soooo hard hehehe

I got grades A, A, A*, A* for bio, physics, chem and maths GCSE'S (respectively) and my settling in exam results: B, B, U, D (same order) I'm sure its pretty easy to spot the difference... My strong subjects are not my strong subjects anymore loool thats why GCSE results can be misleading at times

I would say think about what you want to do at uni and depend your decision on that and if you do choose to go ahead with these subjects then be prepared to work hard.

I'd be glad to ans anymore questions based on my experiences so far
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Meh12
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I would definitely agree with the previous poster...its quite a big jump from gcse to alevels but after a while you get settled in...you just need to keep on top of the work really...

I think doing those alevels together is a good combination but Maths is a subject which requires a lot of time and practice so it has quite a heat workload but having said that , studying Maths and science together is good in terms of helping you understand the sciences as its all interlinked


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Meh12
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* sorry meant to say heavy workload not heat workload


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Jaydude
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(Original post by Meh12)
* sorry meant to say heavy workload not heat workload


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Basically, this is the best way I can put it,

Size=Difficulty;

Imagine planet Earth, that's GCSE,- now imagine the size of the universe, that's A levels.

Hope that made sense lol.

Chill, it was only a joke. :giggle:
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janeA
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even i agree with previous posts that the jump between gcses and a levels is large....whats even more worst is the jump between AS and A2..its huuuuge....AS is way easier than A2 especially in chemistry... with some hard work i'm pretty sure you'll manage your AS.. the question comes when you do A2..well of course you can drop one subjects if you find hard to do all 4 of them...so i'll say give them a try and if you feel you can manage the load you can drop one subject or just do it up to AS only!

another idea is doing AS and A2 together...it kind of make AS easier and therefore u'll score better in AS papers...this how I felt,but its up to you..

like the others said...the grade you get in your gcses is no indication of how well you do in your A levels...you'll have to make a lot of sacrifices..but if you plan your time well,especially in A2, u'll make your life much much easier without having to freak out b4 exams..

good luck!
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Dursty
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I went from GCSEs acting all cocky with relatively decent grades (5A*6A) and took AS Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and Economics. My first year results were CDEU. I used the same level of workload I did throughout my GCSEs and this came as a bit of a shock.
Needless to say I retook the year, achieved AAAA and am now waiting for offers from Top Uni's for Economics so even if the first year doesnt go as planned all hope is not lost haha!
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strivingsoul
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To answer the question; very hard.
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On The Horizon
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If you are interested and highly motivated to learn and practice, then the Sciences are fairly easy. Some tough concepts in Physics and Chemistry, especially at A2, but like I said if you're a fan of science and want to learn, then it should be possible to do well.
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jonnyb123
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(Original post by 3mma_gal96)
Hi, pretty self-explanatory, but I was thinking about taking Biol, Physics and Chemistry for definite at A level. I'm now in yr 11 and on my yr 10 summer exams, I achieved A* Biol, As for physics and Chemistry (1 mark of A*)
What is the transition like between gcse and A-level? Obviously I'll have to do a lot more work, but does it become incredibly stressful and hard?
Also, I was possibly considering maths, but it's not my best subject. Would this be not a wise move?
Any advice from older students please?

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Hey there, I did exactly the same subjects as those and felt the same about maths! I dropped maths at AS and am taking the 3 sciences to A2.

I got an A* in chemistry GCSE and As in biology and physics. An A in GCSE maths too. I got 4 As at AS level, even managed to scrape an A in maths! And I'm (hopefully!) on track to get 3 As at A2. Don't feel obliged to take maths, because of physics. I would say it's really not much help for AS physics, because you don't really have to deal with any complicated mathematical concepts in AS physics. Although if you are planning to take physics to A2 then maths to AS might help, as it does get a bit more difficult maths-wise. Still, as long as you are confident in your maths ability and interested in physics then you should be okay!

I think you'll be fine, you've already got some very good grades and if you are interested in these subjects I'm sure you'll be naturally motivated to do well. The step up in work is probably less than doing A levels like history or English (I wouldn't know though, but I'd guess so because of the amount of essays you have to do etc.). However what it lacks in volume it probably makes up for in difficulty, but once you get what's going on, you don't need to do that much work, just enough to stay on top of everything!

If you want any more advice or info feel free to PM me
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3mma_gal96
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Thank-you everyone, it's all really helpful

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HeWhoSaysHeCan
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I've been told that A level Biology is of GCSE standard.
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redcider5
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A Levels are a big, big step up but you do get used to it. I would say that if you are willing to put in time and effort (and a lot of it) you can do well in the 3 sciences.
Everyone I know who got an A in GCSE maths got C-U at AS level and almost all didn't go onto A2. I think that you need a natural ability in maths to take it to AS, personally.
If you are wanting to do a science based degree I would say than a high grade in an arts subject looks a lot better than a low grade in maths.
Something else to bear in mind though, doing mechanics does help you with physics...
I hope I've helped in some way.
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tory88
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I did that at AS, plus further maths. There is a big step up from GCSE, but not an insurmountable one. I'd say they sound like pretty good choices, and provided you work hard there's no reason you can't do well.
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3mma_gal96
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(Original post by redcider5)
A Levels are a big, big step up but you do get used to it. I would say that if you are willing to put in time and effort (and a lot of it) you can do well in the 3 sciences.
Everyone I know who got an A in GCSE maths got C-U at AS level and almost all didn't go onto A2. I think that you need a natural ability in maths to take it to AS, personally.
If you are wanting to do a science based degree I would say than a high grade in an arts subject looks a lot better than a low grade in maths.
Something else to bear in mind though, doing mechanics does help you with physics...
I hope I've helped in some way.
I want to study medicine, and am currently A* at history, but would this be frowned upon at A level?


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Renacle
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(Original post by 3mma_gal96)
I want to study medicine, and am currently A* at history, but would this be frowned upon at A level?


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Most unis only care that you definitely have chemistry and biology‚ I also do history a level and currently have a medicine offer. Having a contrasting subject is absolutely fine with most unis as it actually shows you're quite academically well rounded.

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Gotzz
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Don't pick maths if you don't enjoy it or aren't good at it.
Only pick subjects that you like. I'm in year 12 and do the sciences and maths and I enjoy all my subjects except physics, which results in me doing a lot more revision for the subjects I enjoy and almost completely neglecting physics as I just can't stick to something that doesn't interest me.
Oh and btw, I got these grades at GCSE, in maths, biology, chemistry and physics respectively: A*AA*A* and these in my December mocks (same order): AABD
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redcider5
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(Original post by 3mma_gal96)
I want to study medicine, and am currently A* at history, but would this be frowned upon at A level?


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Not at all, just shows that you are a well rounded applicant and history is recognised as a challenging A-Level. My friend got 3 interviews with a-levels in biology chemistry and english lit (shes at HYMS now) and she did french at AS as she knew maths wasn't her fortay. Most medical schools don't need the maths-but check their specific requirements before you apply, as places like Cambridge may be picky about this
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TimmonaPortella
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How long is a piece of string?

What do people expect when they ask these questions? Obviously it's very highly dependent upon your ability and diligence...
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TheMysteryMan
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Currently do all 4, physics is detrimental
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