Jessops, HMV and Blockbuster - who's next? Watch

moogoomonkey
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Jack93o)
pcworld/currys, GAME

soon the high streets would just be clothes retailers, 99p stores and coffee chains
I agree with you mate, especially with online alternatives such as steam. I don't buy any games from there any more, just the odd pack of MTG cards...
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Superunknown17
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#82
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#82
(Original post by SoNottingH)
McDonalds are like Poundland, they do better in recessions as people move to the false charms of "cheap" food.
Exactly, instead of going out for a meal, they take-out McDonalds, same with Dominoes and other fast food chains, the ones who do delivery are especially prosperous.
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derek1
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#83
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#83
Sports direct wont go under, ****e shops but they have a lot under their belt to prop them up especially with jjb gubbed
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dhr90
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#84
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#84
Waterstones should be okay with that billionaire helping to restructure and aim at other areas of the market. I like it in there, always good to find some new books, and you can reserve online at the online price and then pay and collect instore which is good. If they can compete on price a bit more then they will do well.

Seen some rumours that Halfords will soon be going. Not too surprising given the reliability of cars these days and how badly insurance (for younger people especially) is crippling the modding scene, although they should be doing well out of cycles after 2012, they have an horrific reputation amongst cyclists though.

A friend works in homebase and is looking to leave as soon as he gets work elsewhere, they have been doing poorly for a long time now apparently.
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chriscao
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#85
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#85
GAME isnt going to close because they supply quite cheap and affordable video games with prices that compete with retailers such as amazon.
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callum9999
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#86
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#86
(Original post by Varangian95)
Game/Gamestation, for the following reasons:
1) Steam has wiped the floor with them on PC games, and given the development of big picture mode and the rest, they're moving to take a slice of the living room games market from Xbox and Playstation.
2) As a company that sells physical games, they're going to become obsolete when PS4 and the 720 get released. All games moving to download only? Not gonna be able to keep the company alive for long after that.
1) Game had been phasing out PC games well before steam came along and no, it isn't going to take any meaningful slice of the living room games market any time soon.

2) The next consoles obviously won't be download only - that would be absurd.
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Bluffroom
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#87
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#87
I'm guessing GAME - whenever I see it it's either bursting or completely dead. The Works maybe as nobody goes in there near me.
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Fusion
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#88
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#88
Surely GAME will benefit from HMV going under (maybe not during the firesale, but afterwards)


And what happens to all these retail premises - are landlords acting as a monopolist, agaisnt the greater good..
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HappyCheesecake
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#89
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#89
(Original post by pandapops)
Surprised Carpet Right haven't been gone years ago? Does anyone even shop in there?
The one nearest to me is practically empty 99% of the time...

When I was younger though and we were refurbishing our house, my sister and I would often tag along with my parents and fantasise what carpets we would have in our 'future' homes. Good times...
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snailsareslimy
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#90
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#90
Home Interior places like Harry Corry will eventually. Always old people in those kind of shops and we all know how many find the pension tight.
I'd agree with Waterstones, too. A lot of their books are just really expensive and they don't have the best selection either.
I think M&S is on its way out, also. Again, it's usually full of older people and their food is fairly expensive. Their quality standards have also really decreased :/
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SoNottingH
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#91
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#91
(Original post by snailsareslimy)
Home Interior places like Harry Corry will eventually. Always old people in those kind of shops and we all know how many find the pension tight.
I'd agree with Waterstones, too. A lot of their books are just really expensive and they don't have the best selection either.
I think M&S is on its way out, also. Again, it's usually full of older people and their food is fairly expensive. Their quality standards have also really decreased :/
M & S food is still reliably very good though, sometimes they lack a bit of inspiration, but the only genuine competition nationally is Waitrose and they aren't nearly as widespread. Sainsburys are OK but they don't have the same quality generally.
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Hustler-1337
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#92
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#92
(Original post by scrotgrot)
I don't actually think this will result in a few huge megaretailers controlling the market like you say. Maybe in out-of-town shopping centres they will, but I really think/hope - IF RENTS COME DOWN - we will see a proliferation of more individual local shops on the actual high street. It will require co-operation between councils, retailers and everyone else though.

I thought Game had already gone a couple of years ago (though you do still see them) I think they at least culled a load of stores and moved online a bit more.

I think Currys and PC World will be all right, old people are still after big tellies, off-the-shelf laptops, tablets and as you say the only remaining player.

No idea who Robert Dyas even are.

Sports Direct - buoyed by the closure of JJB but I imagine it's only a matter of time

Argos - think they'll be OK, I think the prices are pretty good for what I've got from there, also I think they are making big profits. Argos catalogue is still an institution and people feel comfortable with it.

Smiths have been awful for years I think they deserve to go under.

Carpet shops are needed but that seems to me to be a bit more rough and ready industry, wouldn't call it retail but then I've never bought a carpet...

I think people will start saving cash by buying second-hand furniture (Freecycle) so furniture/bed shops are probably in trouble - also need a lot of square footage for that.

Savers is utter ****e, what is it even meant to be, some sort of pharmacy? It will die off soon I agree.

Clarks I don't think will die, people always need shoes and they need to bethere to try them on, and Clarks is the best established of all the shoe shops.

I've always liked this wry observation from the Hitchhiker's Guide:
Yeh, rent is a major contributing factor as to why so many independent shops are closing down, forget to comment on that when you mentioned it earlier. This is particularly worse in the city centres where they are ridiculously high. How are businesses meant to survive when the biggest cost they face is rent? It drives out independent shops and leaves it for the larger retailers who are more able to absorb rental costs or cross subside from other activities to occupy city centre or high rental area spaces. The property market needs to be sorted out and the government should intervene (probably at the cost of the taxpayer if it's subsidies or some sort of rent relief, which won't give them much of an incentive). I've heard of so many independent traders who've closed down because they can't afford to rent their business no longer.

Robert Dyas aren't really that well-known as they're not in every major town/city, but they do have quite a few stores around the country and are quite reputable. I agree with that quote, the number of shoe shops on the high street were far too many, often selling faux leather and cheap tat. I've seen shops such as Priceless Shoes, Shoe Zone, close down in my local high street. Forgot to add, I think Matalan and Peacocks will soon disappear from our high street.
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Ladyliesel
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#93
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#93
(Original post by Funtry)
I disagree with those three, I'd say somewhere such as GAME/Gamestation. Too much online, same as Blockbusters/HMV. WHSmith are always really busy, Waterstones are the only big bookshop left (bar Borders) and a lot of people I know who read a lot prefer to buy from such a shop.

Argos are too unique and a lot of people use it
I particularly agree about GAME. The one from my hometown disappeared and I could never find certain games there, they were only available online.
I hope you're right about Waterstones. As a big reader I prefer to physically look over the shelves.
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Jack93o
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#94
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#94
phones 4 u and carphonewarehouse will survive...for now

because with contract phones, you can't just do it over the internet
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kpwxx
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#95
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#95
I reckon somewhere specific like toys r us; their products are offered cheaper in places like argos or online and a lot of people don't warrant going there.

I don't think waterstones will be in trouble though always very busy (though HMV was too in my town!) and books are one of those things which people REALLY like to browse in person and have hard copies of. I know the hard copies thing applies for some people for CDs but not as many people, as a lot rely only on downloads... there is still widespread opposition to ebooks from many, and it's kind of like trying on clothes- seeing a book allows a tester, and excitement!

xxx
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JOR2010
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#96
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#96
(Original post by MetropolisBoy)
i really like WHsmith, but they need to sort their prices out
It's hilarious. Who wants to spend £5 on a pack of 10 biros?
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tinman1
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#97
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#97
WHSmiths is a shout. Anywhere that sells a small packet of winegums for £2.99 deserves to plummet down a blackhole.
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This Honest
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#98
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#98
(Original post by MetropolisBoy)
i really like WHsmith, but they need to sort their prices out
This!!

One mentos costs 0.76p while in corner shops, it's 49p. Sainsburys are selling a pack of 4 mentos for £1. Deal


Posted from TSR Mobile
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SoNottingH
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#99
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#99
(Original post by This Honest)
This!!

One mentos costs 0.76p while in corner shops, it's 49p. Sainsburys are selling a pack of 4 mentos for £1. Deal


Posted from TSR Mobile
They just do well based on location - if I'm waiting at the station for the train home and I need a pen or a mag, they are handy and there isn't much choice.
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Tier
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#100
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#100
I hope Foyles survives. It's my favourite shop ever. All those books man
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