Go into computer science with a maths or physics degree Watch

GoodDay
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My physics teacher says that some people go into cs with a physics degree but how disadvantaged would they be in the job market compared to someone with cs degree? and the same for maths please
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chelseafan
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Why don't you want to do a CS degree?
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Valentas
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I know a guy who ran away from physics PHD to do CS. He said he took computers like a duck water Now he's working in California and earns 200k+ a year. He started CS degree when he was 29 years old. Never too late.
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GoodDay
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(Original post by chelseafan)
Why don't you want to do a CS degree?
I'm not quite sure yet whether I want to or not, I just want to see if CS is still an option if I go down another route
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thefish_uk
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(Original post by GoodDay)
My physics teacher says that some people go into cs with a physics degree but how disadvantaged would they be in the job market compared to someone with cs degree? and the same for maths please
You're getting the career mixed up with the degree... I think the career you're thinking of is software engineering?

In which case, yes, people go into software engineering with computer science, maths, physics and engineering degrees. Plus, I'd imagine, others. Basically any degree which shows you are good at maths.
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DarkHiatus
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Many people with physics degrees go into software engineering. However, an interest in programming is generally a must as a typical physics degree doesn't dedicate much time to good programming. If you enjoy programming in your spare time and enjoy solving problems and continue to do this, it should be simple enough to show an employer that you possess the right skills.
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Malabarista
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(Original post by GoodDay)
My physics teacher says that some people go into cs with a physics degree but how disadvantaged would they be in the job market compared to someone with cs degree? and the same for maths please
I probably should have made this thread last year. I'm in my last year of sixth form and decided to go with physics in the end. I'm learning to code in my free time, and I would still like to know if that door will be open when I finish my degree, which I'll hopefully be starting this October. Like you, taking CS would have been too much of a gamble for me, since I don't yet know whether I would have preferred doing a degree in CS instead of physics. I do know, however, that I very much enjoy learning to code in my free time.
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GoodDay
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(Original post by DarkHiatus)
If you enjoy programming in your spare time and enjoy solving problems and continue to do this, it should be simple enough to show an employer that you possess the right skills.
Is that how employers generally look at people in programming jobs, they assess people individually rather than through qualifications?
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