geometric sequence quick question AS Watch

CasualSoul
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hmm not sure if I've posted this thought I did but then I checked the recent posts in the maths forum but can't see mine.

please see attatchred having trouble figuing out how to use thee equations I've formed to show what they want me to show
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The Polymath
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Your first equation divided by your second equation = the "show that" equation.

Simple
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by CasualSoul)
hmm not sure if I've posted this thought I did but then I checked the recent posts in the maths forum but can't see mine.

please see attatchred having trouble figuing out how to use thee equations I've formed to show what they want me to show
\dfrac{a(1-r^3)}{1-r} = \dfrac{a}{1-r} \times (1-r^3)
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CasualSoul
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(Original post by The Polymath)
Your first equation divided by your second equation = the "show that" equation.

Simple
oh right yeah I understand that
(Original post by TenOfThem)
\dfrac{a(1-r^3)}{1-r} = \dfrac{a}{1-r} \times (1-r^3)
your method is neat but I don't see what you've done. I see that you've put the first equation equal to something else but please could you explain where the 'something else bit' has come from
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The Polymath
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(Original post by CasualSoul)
oh right yeah I understand that


your method is neat but I don't see what you've done. I see that you've put the first equation equal to something else but please could you explain where the 'something else bit' has come from
He's literally done what I said.

Equation 1 = a(1-r^3)/(1-r)
Equation 2 = a/(1-r)
Equation 3 = (1-r^3)

Equation 1 / Equation 2 = Equation 3

So Equation 1 = Equation 2 x Equation 3 <- this is what he wrote
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CasualSoul
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(Original post by The Polymath)
He's literally done what I said.

Equation 1 = a(1-r^3)/(1-r)
Equation 2 = a/(1-r)
Equation 3 = (1-r^3)

Equation 1 / Equation 2 = Equation 3

So Equation 1 = Equation 2 x Equation 3 <- this is what he wrote
Ta
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by The Polymath)
He's literally done what I said.

Equation 1 = a(1-r^3)/(1-r)
Equation 2 = a/(1-r)
Equation 3 = (1-r^3)

Equation 1 / Equation 2 = Equation 3

So Equation 1 = Equation 2 x Equation 3 <- this is what he wrote
And it was all the more impressive as I had a sex change whilst doing it

Apparently
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