What are the tips to learn programming skills? Watch

joseph156
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Hi friends.
What are the best way to learn programming skills for beginners.
Please share your suggestions to me.



Thanks & regards
Joseph
Rxonlineshopee
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Aristotle's' Disciple
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(Original post by joseph156)
Hi friends.
What are the best way to learn programming skills for beginners.
Please share your suggestions to me.



Thanks & regards
Joseph
Rxonlineshopee
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
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cmad95
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(Original post by Aristotle's' Disciple)
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.
Practice.

+ practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice and more practice
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Ateo
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You might want to look here: http://www.codecademy.com/learn
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zedeneye1
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(Original post by joseph156)
Hi friends.
What are the best way to learn programming skills for beginners.
Please share your suggestions to me.



Thanks & regards
Joseph
Rxonlineshopee
If you are in a computer science (or similar) degree course, never ignore the maths courses...

you can still write programs when you didn't perform good in programming courses. but if you miss out on the maths, you will get stuck very bad. thats when you're asked to write programs for complex math problems...
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beepbeeprichie
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(Original post by zedeneye1)
If you are in a computer science (or similar) degree course, never ignore the maths courses...

you can still write programs when you didn't perform good in programming courses. but if you miss out on the maths, you will get stuck very bad. thats when you're asked to write programs for complex math problems...
Good programming isn't about complex maths. Good programming is about clear and logical thought.

You need to be good at maths if you're doing a complex mathematical program. But that should be obvious, just as you'd need to be a highly competent chemist to write a chemical modelling program.
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the bear
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have you seen these ?



http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/the-times


also

http://o2learn.decoded.co/beta.php

password: welovecoding
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Stormy Seas
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You only need mathematics to code mathematics. You don't need mathematics to be a decent programmer in general.

Many people in my engineering course think they can program well because they can type up mathematical equations in code. I disagree . It's more to do with logical thinking and doing it in the most efficient and structured way possible.

If you want to learn web based programming try out w3schools.
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Educate95
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(Original post by joseph156)
Hi friends.
What are the best way to learn programming skills for beginners.
Please share your suggestions to me.



Thanks & regards
Joseph
Rxonlineshopee
Hey I'm in a similar situation to you. I'm at college doing Computing and have just started doing a programming unit. I'd say get a couple of good books, read up online, and practice as often as you can. Do a little a bit everyday or every couple of days. Java is a good language to learn. There are some good tutorials online that you can follow also. Good luck.
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Psyk
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I think one of the most important skills is to know how to correctly ask questions. This includes where you should ask.

You get a lot of beginners asking questions in say a C++ board when really their question is a general programming one, or about an algorithm, rather than actually relating to the C++ language. It genuinely isn't always easy for a beginner to know the distinction.

Although even beginners should know not to ask about programming in the general chat section of a non-programming forum
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Psyk
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(Original post by beepbeeprichie)
Good programming isn't about complex maths. Good programming is about clear and logical thought.

You need to be good at maths if you're doing a complex mathematical program. But that should be obvious, just as you'd need to be a highly competent chemist to write a chemical modelling program.
Well put.

The reason maths skills are considered so important for CS courses is for two reasons in my opinion:

1) Although programming itself isn't that mathematical, most of the interesting problems (especially those academics find interesting) require maths to model and solve them. So a CS course will involve a lot of maths, because a CS course isn't really about programming, it's about using programming and maths to solve problems.

2) If someone is good at maths, it's a good indicator they have a clear and logical thought process that is required to be good at programming.
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SillyEddy
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Start by asking in the correct forum. There will be people who can help you. You will need to start by picking a language and an area of expertise... Not all languages do everything (it is silly to try to make a website with C++, but very sensible for other tasks) so you need to know what you want to make.

Practice a lot. Find existing projects or make your own. If there is a bit of software you like, try to make it yourself to understand why it works.


Start small though. When learning C++ I made a few command line programs which helped me with my physics homework!
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zedeneye1
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(Original post by beepbeeprichie)
Good programming isn't about complex maths. Good programming is about clear and logical thought.

You need to be good at maths if you're doing a complex mathematical program. But that should be obvious, just as you'd need to be a highly competent chemist to write a chemical modelling program.
no, you'll have to be good at math for chemical modelling programs as well...

maths is used everywhere...and most practical applications do require math.
math is what electronic computers were invented for.

for example, you are asked to write a program that tells the number of digits in a number input from the keyboard...
someone who doesn't know math would probably get stuck for some time, but if you knew math, you would instantly know that you're supposed to use log10...

and these kind of things do save alot of time later on in programming life, knowing math "by heart"...
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miser
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These are the five steps to learning to code:

  1. Choose a language - if you're starting out I'd recommend a beginner-friendly one like Python.
  2. There are absolutely tons of resources out there, so once you've chosen a language, google some tutorials in it and follow them.
  3. Now you've got the bare fundamentals down, you need a project. Think of a project you want to do (and this is key) - make sure it's one that you're interested in or else you will get bored. For me, I do a lot of games projects. If you find a project that compels you to stay up late just to finish parts of it, then learning to code won't be an activity for you, it'll be the by-product of working on what you enjoy doing anyway. Games projects are also good because they involve a lot of different programming problems.
  4. Code your project, searching google or asking questions every time you get stuck. See it through.
  5. Go back to step 3; continue forever or until you want to learn a new language.
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beepbeeprichie
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(Original post by zedeneye1)
no, you'll have to be good at math for chemical modelling programs as well...

maths is used everywhere...and most practical applications do require math.
math is what electronic computers were invented for.

for example, you are asked to write a program that tells the number of digits in a number input from the keyboard...
someone who doesn't know math would probably get stuck for some time, but if you knew math, you would instantly know that you're supposed to use log10...

and these kind of things do save alot of time later on in programming life, knowing math "by heart"...
Yes you will need to be good at maths too but that doesn't mean anything because maths is very relevant to chemistry, not to programming. There is very clearly a distinction between general programming skills and skills required by the nature of the programming you are undertaking.

I also don't buy the idea that because computers were invented for x that humans should therefore use them for x (which is what you are implicitly stating). Humans were designed to reproduce that doesn't mean it is our purpose.

That example you just gave me can be googled in 5-10 seconds. I have family members who have been programmers all their lives, and whilst proficient mathematicians, repeatedly says that mathematics plays virtually no roles in their careers. If you look at the vast majority of programs then little advanced mathematics is actually used. MS Word, internet explorer, share programs, basic games employ very limited amount of mathematics.

No doubt mathematics plays a huge role in some programming roles (for instance designing software to efficiently model computer chips) but in general I don't think it's the case.
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