Kshanahan
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I'm right at the end of my GCSE art; my exam piece has started, but we are still working on our main project as well. I am still slightly confused as to the layout of art sketchbooks, I got a high A star in my first project, but I don't know whether my second will get the same. I have done A LOT of written analysis of artists, basically entire pages of writing; it's beginning to look more like an art history book than a GCSE sketchbook.
However I have still done a lot of sketching, development work and museum entries...should I be worrying about the amount of written work in my book?
Thank you for your help everyone!
0
reply
Kshanahan
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#2
Please help!!
0
reply
rlscope
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
I got full marks in my art GCSE, so hopefully I'll be of some help!

On the pages where it's fully writing, that's absolutely fine, but just make sure that they look artistic - do a watercolour wash for the background or something, and you could include some of the artists work there too, or your own interpretation of them. It's important to have artist appreciation, just make sure that the facts aren't simply about the artist's life, but about their work and your interpretation of it etc.

You can also use some pages to explain the different media you have used - eg how it works and stuff - in your final pieces, with any trials you did before you created the final piece.
1
reply
The Wild Youth
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by Kshanahan)
I'm right at the end of my GCSE art; my exam piece has started, but we are still working on our main project as well. I am still slightly confused as to the layout of art sketchbooks, I got a high A star in my first project, but I don't know whether my second will get the same. I have done A LOT of written analysis of artists, basically entire pages of writing; it's beginning to look more like an art history book than a GCSE sketchbook.
However I have still done a lot of sketching, development work and museum entries...should I be worrying about the amount of written work in my book?
Thank you for your help everyone!

If you got marked at an A* before then what are you worrying about? I had a teacher who was a very very harsh marker in all the projects leading up to the final ones which made me work my butt off to get the A*.

I don't think you have to do too much detail for analysing each artist. Obviously you have to do some but rather than writing pages and pages it's far better to use them as an influence in your own work; to write a bit about them and then begin relating their work to yours and then developing from it. If you feel you're writing an art history book then that is too much writing. Write a couple paragraphs about 1 or 2 specific pieces of work then write a bit (not a lot!!) as you go along, saying why you're doing certain things, where your thinking's coming from.

From what I remember, you have to just keep up the amount of work you're producing and show a development of skills. Take lots of your own images (that's very important) and use them to create pieces. It's great that you're going to gallerys - make sure you show how you're picking up on techniques you've seen used there and any new artists you might discover, use your visits to influence your work. Hope that was helpful
2
reply
Kshanahan
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by rlscope)
I got full marks in my art GCSE, so hopefully I'll be of some help!

On the pages where it's fully writing, that's absolutely fine, but just make sure that they look artistic - do a watercolour wash for the background or something, and you could include some of the artists work there too, or your own interpretation of them. It's important to have artist appreciation, just make sure that the facts aren't simply about the artist's life, but about their work and your interpretation of it etc.

You can also use some pages to explain the different media you have used - eg how it works and stuff - in your final pieces, with any trials you did before you created the final piece.
Thank you, this is very helpful! I had done backgrounds and nice titles for some of them but not all; I will do now!
unfortunately my only medium allowed is ceramics (according to my teacher) so I can only do pages about sculpture...I guess I could do different ceramics (limestone, clay etc)...Thank you again!
0
reply
Kshanahan
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by The Wild Youth)
If you got marked at an A* before then what are you worrying about? I had a teacher who was a very very harsh marker in all the projects leading up to the final ones which made me work my butt off to get the A*.

I don't think you have to do too much detail for analysing each artist. Obviously you have to do some but rather than writing pages and pages it's far better to use them as an influence in your own work; to write a bit about them and then begin relating their work to yours and then developing from it. If you feel you're writing an art history book then that is too much writing. Write a couple paragraphs about 1 or 2 specific pieces of work then write a bit (not a lot!!) as you go along, saying why you're doing certain things, where your thinking's coming from.

From what I remember, you have to just keep up the amount of work you're producing and show a development of skills. Take lots of your own images (that's very important) and use them to create pieces. It's great that you're going to gallerys - make sure you show how you're picking up on techniques you've seen used there and any new artists you might discover, use your visits to influence your work. Hope that was helpful
Thank you for your help! I think i'm just going to have to build up the amount of other stuff I do (sketches etc) so that everything else isn't outweighed by my mountain of writing But perhaps I can break it down a bit so it isn't too much?
I have done a lot of the other stuff you mention so hopefully I'll be alright.
Thank you again for all the advice!
0
reply
rlscope
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by Kshanahan)
Thank you, this is very helpful! I had done backgrounds and nice titles for some of them but not all; I will do now!
unfortunately my only medium allowed is ceramics (according to my teacher) so I can only do pages about sculpture...I guess I could do different ceramics (limestone, clay etc)...Thank you again!
It really makes all the difference and you can always include pictures of pieces of theirs that have inspired you, and then paint a small version of it or something.

Wow, wait, why are you only allowed to use ceramics?! That would have been a nightmare for me during my GCSE art! But yeah, try to just get as much variety in there as you can.
0
reply
Pinkhead
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
Try to BS as much as you can. Examiners love when you try to be pretentious. The fact that you've done a lot of writing is good.

-Don't leave too much of the page white - this means even filling them in with random colours where it looks dull.

-Try to document everything, including your progress from one idea to another. It needs to look like you're developing your ideas one step at a time.

-The work doesn't have to be spectacular although it will help if it is.

-the sketch pad honestly isn't THAT important. Mine wasn't amazing but I guess my other work made up for it.

-draw things even if they aren't related to your project. I drew a bunch of random things that I enjoyed drawing just for the sake of not dying of boredom. These also turned out better than my other sketches since I actually enjoyed doing them. You could always write about how you were trying new ideas but ey didn't work out and you didn't want em in your final piece, blah blah.

-Finally, if you can't finish your sketchbook, rip a couple of pages out - it worked for me

A lot of this has probably been mentioned in other posts but I haven't read through. Hope it helps.
1
reply
tyrar
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
Just make sure that you have enough annotation and that it's consistent
0
reply
02simm
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Pinkhead)
Try to BS as much as you can. Examiners love when you try to be pretentious. The fact that you've done a lot of writing is good.

-Don't leave too much of the page white - this means even filling them in with random colours where it looks dull.

-Try to document everything, including your progress from one idea to another. It needs to look like you're developing your ideas one step at a time.

-The work doesn't have to be spectacular although it will help if it is.

-the sketch pad honestly isn't THAT important. Mine wasn't amazing but I guess my other work made up for it.

-draw things even if they aren't related to your project. I drew a bunch of random things that I enjoyed drawing just for the sake of not dying of boredom. These also turned out better than my other sketches since I actually enjoyed doing them. You could always write about how you were trying new ideas but ey didn't work out and you didn't want em in your final piece, blah blah.

-Finally, if you can't finish your sketchbook, rip a couple of pages out - it worked for me

A lot of this has probably been mentioned in other posts but I haven't read through. Hope it helps.
whatever you do, do not do that
0
reply
Pinkhead
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by 02simm)
whatever you do, do not do that
Worked for me. My tips were really quick work-arounds. Obviously if is better if you do it properly.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19
  • University for the Creative Arts
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19
  • University of Gloucestershire
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19

Have you made up your mind on your five uni choices?

Yes I know where I'm applying (65)
65.66%
No I haven't decided yet (21)
21.21%
Yes but I might change my mind (13)
13.13%

Watched Threads

View All