DiyaM95
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Hi!
I currently hold a conditional offer to study for the LLB at King's - I loved the place at the open day, but I was wondering if any current students can offer any insight into what it's like to study there?

How are the professors, and the student support? And are there many societies/opportunities to do mooting or pro bono work?

Also, is anyone firming King's for Law?

Thank you!
xxxx
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gtfo
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(Original post by DiyaM95)
Hi!
I currently hold a conditional offer to study for the LLB at King's - I loved the place at the open day, but I was wondering if any current students can offer any insight into what it's like to study there?

How are the professors, and the student support? And are there many societies/opportunities to do mooting or pro bono work?

Also, is anyone firming King's for Law?

Thank you!
xxxx
King's is amazing, I love it here. For law, the teaching and facilities are first class, and the location is second to none.

I'm a big fan of pretty much all of the professors. Many of them are leaders in their fields, and while you do occasionally get a lecture where the material is presented in a less than exciting way, for the most part they're engaging and a great introduction to each subject.

I've not really had any problems since I got here, so I don't feel qualified to talk about student support.

There are three legal societies; the Law, Bar and Mooting societies. The former arranges all the vocational stuff with city firms, all of which are keen to meet KCL students, and there are multiple events most weeks. The Bar society caters for aspiring barristers, and arranges visits to the inns of court, chambers, and puts on lots of mooting workshops and competitions. The Law and Bar societies are constantly trying to outdo each other with the opulence of their parties, so expect a lot of nights out in Mayfair, and dinners in fancy hotels with prestigious legal speakers. The Mooting society arranges yet more workshops and competitions; between them and the Bar society, there is something moot related going on pretty much all the time.

The Pro Bono society is a pretty big deal too. I didn't have time to do anything this year myself, but there's a dozen or so programmes within the umbrella of Pro Bono, mostly consisting of legal clinics and streetlaw type endeavours. For a dedicated few there are opportunities to do research for Amicus, who provide representation for those facing the death penalty in the United States.
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arguendo
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(Original post by DiyaM95)
Hi!
I currently hold a conditional offer to study for the LLB at King's - I loved the place at the open day, but I was wondering if any current students can offer any insight into what it's like to study there?

How are the professors, and the student support? And are there many societies/opportunities to do mooting or pro bono work?

Also, is anyone firming King's for Law?

Thank you!
xxxx
congratulations on your offer! i'm a third year law student so hopefully can provide some insight.

lecturers have been, in my experience, great - they're all very on top of their subjects and most can make even a dull subject interesting; the few times i've been bored in lectures, it's been because i just don't enjoy that particular subject, and not a reflection on the quality of the teaching staff, who are great tutors vary as some can have very different approaches to the same subject, but all the tutors i've had have been very approachable.

student support varies; generally, at university, the approach is that you need to seek out your personal tutor. they won't keep checking up on you; i found that quite surprising when i started university - i have never met any of my personal tutors because they never contacted me, and instead have turned to teaching staff for advice - which is a reflection on how brilliant the teaching staff are, as i've found them to be really helpful. so yeah, as far as student support goes, we're expected to be proactive. some tutors do take the initiative and contact their students, others expect the students to contact them. i have contacted my personal tutors a few times when i had some problems and they were v helpful.

societies - there are TONS of societies, everything you could possibly think of! law-related ones include law soc, bar soc, pro bono soc, mooting soc; law soc and bar soc run mooting competitions and there are several internal competitions each year as well as external. mooting soc (as far as i know) runs practice moots to help people improve, and there's also debating soc. pro bono soc runs all the pro bono projects and has a website here: http://kclprobono.org.uk/. there's quite a lot of opportunity to get involved with pro bono if you want to - some projects are competitive because of the amount of applications, but there are always ways to get involved. look out for the chance to be a first year rep in the various law-related societies

if you wanted insight into the timetable/study pattern, in your first year you'll study criminal, european, contract and public law if you're on the straight LLB programme. there's 2 hours of lectures a week and a one hour weekly tutorial for each module, and in the last couple of years they've introduced a few research seminars throughout the year for core modules. i never had research seminars so i'm not too sure what they involve, but i gather it's for a coursework element?

overall i've absolutely loved my time at king's and i will be so sad to leave - it's been a real home and i've met some amazing people here and really enjoyed my studies. <3
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DiyaM95
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(Original post by Pippaaa)
congratulations on your offer! i'm a third year law student so hopefully can provide some insight.

lecturers have been, in my experience, great - they're all very on top of their subjects and most can make even a dull subject interesting; the few times i've been bored in lectures, it's been because i just don't enjoy that particular subject, and not a reflection on the quality of the teaching staff, who are great tutors vary as some can have very different approaches to the same subject, but all the tutors i've had have been very approachable.

student support varies; generally, at university, the approach is that you need to seek out your personal tutor. they won't keep checking up on you; i found that quite surprising when i started university - i have never met any of my personal tutors because they never contacted me, and instead have turned to teaching staff for advice - which is a reflection on how brilliant the teaching staff are, as i've found them to be really helpful. so yeah, as far as student support goes, we're expected to be proactive. some tutors do take the initiative and contact their students, others expect the students to contact them. i have contacted my personal tutors a few times when i had some problems and they were v helpful.

societies - there are TONS of societies, everything you could possibly think of! law-related ones include law soc, bar soc, pro bono soc, mooting soc; law soc and bar soc run mooting competitions and there are several internal competitions each year as well as external. mooting soc (as far as i know) runs practice moots to help people improve, and there's also debating soc. pro bono soc runs all the pro bono projects and has a website here: http://kclprobono.org.uk/. there's quite a lot of opportunity to get involved with pro bono if you want to - some projects are competitive because of the amount of applications, but there are always ways to get involved. look out for the chance to be a first year rep in the various law-related societies

if you wanted insight into the timetable/study pattern, in your first year you'll study criminal, european, contract and public law if you're on the straight LLB programme. there's 2 hours of lectures a week and a one hour weekly tutorial for each module, and in the last couple of years they've introduced a few research seminars throughout the year for core modules. i never had research seminars so i'm not too sure what they involve, but i gather it's for a coursework element?

overall i've absolutely loved my time at king's and i will be so sad to leave - it's been a real home and i've met some amazing people here and really enjoyed my studies. <3
That's great! Thank you (and gtfo) for the insight! Do you by any chance know what kind of things that King's Law students go on to do afterwards? I'm the shouty, angry feminist type so I hope King's would suit me :/ which optional modules did you take by the way? xx
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Keify
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(Original post by DiyaM95)
Hi!
I currently hold a conditional offer to study for the LLB at King's - I loved the place at the open day, but I was wondering if any current students can offer any insight into what it's like to study there?

How are the professors, and the student support? And are there many societies/opportunities to do mooting or pro bono work?

Also, is anyone firming King's for Law?

Thank you!
xxxx
Firmed!
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