Is it OK to do weights two days in a row? Watch

paddyman4
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Hi,

So I've heard that it's bad to train every day, as your muscles don't get a chance to recover and so don't get bigger.

Yesterday I did chest, biceps and abs. Muscles are still sore, but I was wondering if I could do back, shoulders and triceps today? Obviously I'm not focusing on the same muscles but I imagine there is some overlap as each machine doesn't just use the muscle group it is aimed at training.
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Old School
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(Original post by paddyman4)
Hi,

So I've heard that it's bad to train every day, as your muscles don't get a chance to recover and so don't get bigger.

Yesterday I did chest, biceps and abs. Muscles are still sore, but I was wondering if I could do back, shoulders and triceps today? Obviously I'm not focusing on the same muscles but I imagine there is some overlap as each machine doesn't just use the muscle group it is aimed at training.
Yes.

'Overtraining' is a lie. People should be training more not less.

I've squatted for 2 weeks straight before without issue and have trained overhead basically everyday this last week. Just make sure you're getting enough food and sleep in to support it and you'll be fine.
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PrinceyJ
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(Original post by Old School)
Yes.

'Overtraining' is a lie. People should be training more not less.

I've squatted for 2 weeks straight before without issue and have trained overhead basically everyday this last week. Just make sure you're getting enough food and sleep in to support it and you'll be fine.
It's a lot easier to do this with experience.
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Old School
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(Original post by PrinceyJ)
It's a lot easier to do this with experience.
It is. But the point is it's possible. I don't get why people are so scared of their own shadow when it comes to training. The human body is capable of 1000x more awesome than most think.
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PrinceyJ
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(Original post by Old School)
It is. But the point is it's possible. I don't get why people are so scared of their own shadow when it comes to training. The human body is capable of 1000x more awesome than most think.
Yeah, just wouldn't recommend it for new people. Also it's much easier if you aren't near your maximum.
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Converse Rocker
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(Original post by paddyman4)
I imagine there is some overlap as each machine doesn't just use the muscle group it is aimed at training.
I'd suggest free weights mate, much more fun in my opinion. As well as other sciencey stuff about stabiliser muscles, but free weights are almost always more fun for me.

(Original post by Old School)
It is. But the point is it's possible. I don't get why people are so scared of their own shadow when it comes to training. The human body is capable of 1000x more awesome than most think.
Is that why programmes like Babylover's SS crop up? Where he essentially says squat heavy back to back if you want because most people (beginners in particular) aren't going to overtrain easily? Or even at all in some cases.
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Old School
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(Original post by Converse Rocker)
Is that why programmes like Babylover's SS crop up? Where he essentially says squat heavy back to back if you want because most people (beginners in particular) aren't going to overtrain easily? Or even at all in some cases.

Basically, yes.

SS is a great program for the first few months of a trainees life whilst they adjust to the massive lifestyle change starting a proper exercise regime entails. I.e. It gets them learning the movements with progression built in whilst only being a 3x/week affair with workouts that are very low volume and therefore don't take all that long.

Beyond that initial transition period though there is no reason why a beginner can't or shouldn't train back to back heavy. They're barely lifting **** and it won't be all that taxing.

Weight should be added to the bar as and when it feels right and rest days should be taken when the trainee feels that they need one. Everyone is different and in order to rise above mediocrity you need to push as hard as your body will allow. Low volume routines like SS offer slow and mediocre gains over the long term. A high volume, high risk-high reward style of training works better and makes you generally more awesome.
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Aston12
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Havn't read the thread. You can train 2 days in a row if you train seperate muscle groups, Chest/Tris one day, Back and Bi's the next, or Chest and Tri's one day, Legs the next. Training the same muscles two days in a row one time is not going to effect you, but you wont have a good workout at all. Overtraining only comes into play when you train like 6/7days a week and have no time for any rest.
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silent ninja
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(Original post by PrinceyJ)
It's a lot easier to do this with experience.
More likely the opposite is true, once you get over the newbie DOMS. The more experienced and skilled (lifting weights requires skill and practice, not just strength) the more your nervous system is taxed because you recruit more of it. Newbs recover faster cos they can't recruit all their muscle fibres or fire all the neurons; they just don't know how. The nervous system doesn't take so much of a beating (a tired nervous system will be draining compared to mere muscle aches). This is also why they can do numerous full body routines a week but advanced athletes need to programme a lot more carefully.

So in summary, just lift that **** up and don't worry. Your body will adapt quickly.

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paddyman4
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(Original post by Converse Rocker)
I'd suggest free weights mate, much more fun in my opinion. As well as other sciencey stuff about stabiliser muscles, but free weights are almost always more fun for me.
I would but I tend to go to the gym on my own as it's right next to where I live, so I just go whenever I feel like it at short notice. So I can't do bench because I don't have a spot.

Also, I feel that with machines it's difficult to do the exercise wrong, whilst with free weights you have to have more of an idea about exactly what movements to do.
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Converse Rocker
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(Original post by paddyman4)
I would but I tend to go to the gym on my own as it's right next to where I live, so I just go whenever I feel like it at short notice. So I can't do bench because I don't have a spot.
I don't think you need a spotter to bench. You can always do the roll of shame if it goes wrong, or if someone is using the bench and you ask to work in with them, you can spot each other.

The only thing I wouldn't suggest doing is a 1RM, other than that I'd happily bench alone and have done in the past. A spotter is nice but if you're sensible I don't think it's absolutely necessary.

Also, I feel that with machines it's difficult to do the exercise wrong, whilst with free weights you have to have more of an idea about exactly what movements to do.
I see what you mean, but start with the bar and you should be fine. Admittedly I have never trained consistently with barbells, but the first time I did squats and bench I did them with no weights on at all. There are plenty of videos on perfecting form, and if you are particularly worried you could post a video on here and the experienced lifters take a look at it for you.

Just making these points because free weights are generally advised over machines (e.g most will advocate squats over leg press, barbell bench over smith machine etc) Not trying to ridicule your training mate.
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Emmy101
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It's not true - it's find to to resistance/free weight training 2 days in a row. It is usually recommended to have 1 day off a week though although whether you take it or not is something else!


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rafa.bodybuilder
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lol.. you can train 2 days in a row as long as your training split is in place. if you trained your chest, biceps and abs, obviously you shouldn't train your back, triceps and shoulders in the day after. you use a lot your biceps while training back so as shoulders and triceps for chest.. actually if you're able to do that in the day after it's because you're not training hard enough..
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Old School
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(Original post by rafa.bodybuilder)
lol.. you can train 2 days in a row as long as your training split is in place. if you trained your chest, biceps and abs, obviously you shouldn't train your back, triceps and shoulders in the day after. you use a lot your biceps while training back so as shoulders and triceps for chest.. actually if you're able to do that in the day after it's because you're not training hard enough..
Surely by your logic olympic lifters should all probably implode because they squat and go overhead hard and heavy every day for 4-6 hours.

Food for thought.
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Dhaden
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(Original post by rafa.bodybuilder)
lol.. you can train 2 days in a row as long as your training split is in place. if you trained your chest, biceps and abs, obviously you shouldn't train your back, triceps and shoulders in the day after. you use a lot your biceps while training back so as shoulders and triceps for chest.. actually if you're able to do that in the day after it's because you're not training hard enough..
If you want to give your body time to recover fully and optimize results then yeah. All Depends on the volume and the intensity of the session, however you can still use the same muscle group the next day however your performance may decline, well saying that it depends on the experience of the athlete in question. Longer the persons trained the quicker they'll be able to recover. Tour De France cyclists are a great example.
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Old School
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(Original post by Dhaden)
If you want to give your body time to recover fully and optimize results then yeah. All Depends on the volume and the intensity of the session, however you can still use the same muscle group the next day however your performance may decline, well saying that it depends on the experience of the athlete in question. Longer the persons trained the quicker they'll be able to recover. Tour De France cyclists are a great example.
Tour de France cyclists are not a good example. Recovery from long distance endurance training and recovery from lifting can't be compared to one another because they are completely different activities that ask different things of the body.

Regardless, recovery from recreational training is a non-issue. Overtraining is really only an issue for elite athletes. Even then it can be easily managed by modulating volume and intensity i.e. if you feel like **** take it easy for a couple days.

More=Better. The human body can take pretty much anything that is thrown at it. You've just got to be brave/crazy enough to see where your limits are.
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Smack
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(Original post by Old School)
Surely by your logic olympic lifters should all probably implode because they squat and go overhead hard and heavy every day for 4-6 hours.

Food for thought.
The weightlifters that do that tend to be genetically elite ones in countries with large doping programmes. Also remember that a true olympic squat is different than how almost everyone else will squat, i.e. it's less taxing on recovery due to the bounce, and that in many cases the lifters who train hard and heavy everyday will be using front squats mainly, and also that the jerk is completely different to a strict or push press.

I am not saying that that style of training doesn't work at all but its effectiveness is heavily exaggerated on the internet, primarily based upon the results of the drug using genetically elite.
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Old School
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(Original post by Smack)
The weightlifters that do that tend to be genetically elite ones in countries with large doping programmes. Also remember that a true olympic squat is different than how almost everyone else will squat, i.e. it's less taxing on recovery due to the bounce, and that in many cases the lifters who train hard and heavy everyday will be using front squats mainly, and also that the jerk is completely different to a strict or push press.

I am not saying that that style of training doesn't work at all but its effectiveness is heavily exaggerated on the internet, primarily based upon the results of the drug using genetically elite.
The feats of turn of the century strongmen and pre roid BBers like Reg Park (well, Reg may have/probably did use gear but not till the 60's) also provide good evidence for why more=better. They did **** that was crazy. They also trained basically every day for several hours.

Also, we suck at oly lifting because are guys don't train enough. Not because everyone else is on the gear.

Also, how do you know if you're genetically 'elite' or not if you don't even try to find your limits? People are irrationally scared of the overtraining bogeyman because the internet tells them to be and the internet tells them they suck and aren't 'elite' therefore should do low volume routines lest they 'overtrain'.
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emerset
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(Original post by paddyman4)
Hi,

So I've heard that it's bad to train every day, as your muscles don't get a chance to recover and so don't get bigger.

Yesterday I did chest, biceps and abs. Muscles are still sore, but I was wondering if I could do back, shoulders and triceps today? Obviously I'm not focusing on the same muscles but I imagine there is some overlap as each machine doesn't just use the muscle group it is aimed at training.
Look some people here have said to do so and we've all heard that you're not supposed to, but it really matters why you're lifting - i.e. what kind of muscle you want to build. There are three reasons I can think of:

Lifting for strength - "power lifting": you then should do full body workouts 5x5 every other day. Although some experienced lifters who are just maintaining their peak form will lift daily.

Lifting for size - "bodybuilding": You should definitely NOT lift every day. The recuperation is just as important as the lifting. Overworking your muscles without proper recuperation will make your muscles leaner even though they may be stronger. Bodybuilding DOES make you strong, but the overall goal is not to be the strongest. A smaller guy who power lifts will always lift more than you, but that's his goal.

Lifting for endurance/health: Most physical sports and health experts condone lifting. Depending on the goal and the sport, mixing lifting with cycling or swimming or something, and it can even become a daily routine.

(So I'm not a trainer I've just studied up on it so feel free to correct me on anything.)
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Smack
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(Original post by Old School)
The feats of turn of the century strongmen and pre roid BBers like Reg Park (well, Reg may have/probably did use gear but not till the 60's) also provide good evidence for why more=better. They did **** that was crazy. They also trained basically every day for several hours.
They also lifted quite a lot less weight than is lifted now. Even in the early 60s they were quite weak by today's standards - I enjoy reading old Starr articles about people maxing out at like sub 300lb deadlifts and the like.

Also, we suck at oly lifting because are guys don't train enough. Not because everyone else is on the gear.
But the gear enables lifters to train more frequently.

Also, how do you know if you're genetically 'elite' or not if you don't even try to find your limits? People are irrationally scared of the overtraining bogeyman because the internet tells them to be and the internet tells them they suck and aren't 'elite' therefore should do low volume routines lest they 'overtrain'.
Well, a lot of people did try training every day and it did break them. If it was all that then surely it would be a common way of training for people other than top weightlifters.
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