Maryb_101
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I'm not sure what topic area to choose from, in psychology, to write up a report. I was going to write about schizophrenia or phobias-but i wouldn't know how to conduct an experiment on it.

I'm going to carry out the experiment on college students and would appreciate it if you guys could give me some ideas on what to do!
Hope i made sense.
Thank you
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Maryb_101
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Anyone?
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Blue56
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(Original post by Maryb_101)
I'm not sure what topic area to choose from, in psychology, to write up a report. I was going to write about schizophrenia or phobias-but i wouldn't know how to conduct an experiment on it.

I'm going to carry out the experiment on college students and would appreciate it if you guys could give me some ideas on what to do!
Hope i made sense.
Thank you
If your using an opportunity sample of college students then it may be quite tedious to conduct an experiment on abnormalities (like Schizophrenia). Typically experiments into it are done though examining secondary statistics from hospitals/government/mental institutions or through finding a sample of Schizophrenics themselves willing to participate. The odds are that there won't be many/any Schizophrenics in your college (1% is the average risk to develop it) and even if there were, or people who had family members that were Schizophrenic, it's unlikely they'd consent to taking part right? What did you want to investigate? Diagnostic criteria? Biochemical/Genetic explanations? Treatments? These really aren't possible with an opportunity sample of college students unfortunately :\

Can you investigate anything? Or does it have to be about abnormalities/disorders? I've got a couple of ideas, if you want them, let me know.
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Maryb_101
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(Original post by Dpdr)
If your using an opportunity sample of college students then it may be quite tedious to conduct an experiment on abnormalities (like Schizophrenia). Typically experiments into it are done though examining secondary statistics from hospitals/government/mental institutions or through finding a sample of Schizophrenics themselves willing to participate. The odds are that there won't be many/any Schizophrenics in your college (1% is the average risk to develop it) and even if there were, or people who had family members that were Schizophrenic, it's unlikely they'd consent to taking part right? What did you want to investigate? Diagnostic criteria? Biochemical/Genetic explanations? Treatments? These really aren't possible with an opportunity sample of college students unfortunately :\

Can you investigate anything? Or does it have to be about abnormalities/disorders? I've got a couple of ideas, if you want them, let me know.
Lol yeah that's true.

I'd appreciate your ideas so hit me up
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Blue56
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(Original post by Maryb_101)
Lol yeah that's true.

Hit me up
When it comes to students, i'd go for cognitive psychology anyday. It's simple, methodology can be quick and research method just a questionnaire.

Thinking about what a sample of students would enjoy, i'd say music is a good bet. So perhaps an experiment on the effect of music on concentration? I'll just lay out the key points of how to design the experiment and if you want to use any of it feel free .

Hypothesis: There will be a significant difference in quiz scores between each condition (Non-directional, two-tailed)

Sample: College students

Group design: Repeated measures (quicker than independent groups)

Research method: 10 question quiz (you can think of some general knowledge questions maybe? Then gather the scores to collect quantitative data)

Methodology: 3 conditions. Condition 1: Students undertake the quiz whilst listening to a rock music track. Condition 2: Students undertake the quiz whilst listening to a classical music track. Condition 3: Students undertake the quiz with no music playing. Perhaps a 5-10 minute break between each condition to avoid order effects (fatigue etc) from the students. A computer with speakers or something would be needed to play the music, but that shouldn't be too difficult in a college hopefully.

Take quiz's in. Mark them. Tally up the scores of the batch from condition 1, then the same for condition 2 and finally the same for condition 3.

See which condition had the best scores, and worst. Then form a conclusion from it (eg, participants in condition 1 scored the lowest, whilst in condition 3 they scored the highest, so this suggests that certain genres of music lower cognitive ability to concentrate).

And there we go, experiment done. This was just a quick 10 minute plan by me, so forgive if there's any errors. But if you don't like the idea that's fine, interpret it how you want and use any of the methodology for another idea if you'd like. Hope this helped a little bit!
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Maryb_101
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(Original post by Dpdr)
When it comes to students, i'd go for cognitive psychology anyday. It's simple, methodology can be quick and research method just a questionnaire.

Thinking about what a sample of students would enjoy, i'd say music is a good bet. So perhaps an experiment on the effect of music on concentration? I'll just lay out the key points of how to design the experiment and if you want to use any of it feel free .

Hypothesis: There will be a significant difference in quiz scores between each condition (Non-directional, two-tailed)

Sample: College students

Group design: Repeated measures (quicker than independent groups)

Research method: 10 question quiz (you can think of some general knowledge questions maybe? Then gather the scores to collect quantitative data)

Methodology: 3 conditions. Condition 1: Students undertake the quiz whilst listening to a rock music track. Condition 2: Students undertake the quiz whilst listening to a classical music track. Condition 3: Students undertake the quiz with no music playing. Perhaps a 5-10 minute break between each condition to avoid order effects (fatigue etc) from the students. A computer with speakers or something would be needed to play the music, but that shouldn't be too difficult in a college hopefully.

Take quiz's in. Mark them. Tally up the scores of the batch from condition 1, then the same for condition 2 and finally the same for condition 3.

See which condition had the best scores, and worst. Then form a conclusion from it (eg, participants in condition 1 scored the lowest, whilst in condition 3 they scored the highest, so this suggests that certain genres of music lower cognitive ability to concentrate).

And there we go, experiment done. This was just a quick 10 minute plan by me, so forgive if there's any errors. But if you don't like the idea that's fine, interpret it how you want and use any of the methodology for another idea if you'd like. Hope this helped a little bit!
Wow this helped A LOT! Bless you.
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