Driving test with no instructor - thoughts? Watch

EB710
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I took my first driving test on Thursday, of which I failed due to lane discipline on a busy roundabout (basically I made someone slow down as I filtered over to leave at the intended exit). Aside from this I only received 3 minors.

With money in mind, I was thinking of taking my next test in my mum's car, without my instructor (so I'd instead take a parent to the test centre). I wouldn't have wanted to do this the first time, but now that I exactly know the test procedure I feel that I would be comfortable with this.

My only concern, and I would have to practice this, is making sure I can do the maneuvers at test standard in my mum's car, which will mean re-learning all the reference points.

My next test is two weeks away from my last test, and I can get a lot of practice in in that time as my dad works from home.

This would save me so much money, however is it realistic? Am I putting myself at a disadvantage?
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by EB710)
I took my first driving test on Thursday, of which I failed due to lane discipline on a busy roundabout (basically I made someone slow down as I filtered over to leave at the intended exit). Aside from this I only received 3 minors.

With money in mind, I was thinking of taking my next test in my mum's car, without my instructor (so I'd instead take a parent to the test centre). I wouldn't have wanted to do this the first time, but now that I exactly know the test procedure I feel that I would be comfortable with this.

My only concern, and I would have to practice this, is making sure I can do the maneuvers at test standard in my mum's car, which will mean re-learning all the reference points.

My next test is two weeks away from my last test, and I can get a lot of practice in in that time as my dad works from home.

This would save me so much money, however is it realistic? Am I putting myself at a disadvantage?

You can easily do your test in your mums car. You need to buy a stick on mirror for the examiner so they can see behind. I think it makes them slightly more nervous because they don't have dual controls.


However, if it was me, I would get the practice in your own car and then take the test in the instructors car - the reference points won't be that different.
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jeddows
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I'd say try the manoeuvres in your Mum's car, and see how you find them. If it's not too bad, then you can give it a try, if you struggle book with your instructor? Remember that even though you won't be paying for a couple of lessons if you use your car, if you fail because of the car (like you said, not knowing the manoeuvres in that car), you'll then have to pay for another test :/
When I was learning to drive, my instructor had a 207 diesel, which was great because it was pretty much impossible to stall it. My Mum's car, that I was insured on, was a Fiesta 1.25 petrol, and was bloody awful, really snatchy clutch (both she and my Dad stall it all the time so it's not just me being a crap driver xD), and also really bad visibility out the back, so I'd never have been able to pass the test it that thing xD
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ROG.
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If you are going to use reference points instead of other methods then how do you invisage being able to do things in the future when you change vehicles many times ?
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username306617
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(Original post by EB710)
I took my first driving test on Thursday, of which I failed due to lane discipline on a busy roundabout (basically I made someone slow down as I filtered over to leave at the intended exit). Aside from this I only received 3 minors.

With money in mind, I was thinking of taking my next test in my mum's car, without my instructor (so I'd instead take a parent to the test centre). I wouldn't have wanted to do this the first time, but now that I exactly know the test procedure I feel that I would be comfortable with this.

My only concern, and I would have to practice this, is making sure I can do the maneuvers at test standard in my mum's car, which will mean re-learning all the reference points.

My next test is two weeks away from my last test, and I can get a lot of practice in in that time as my dad works from home.

This would save me so much money, however is it realistic? Am I putting myself at a disadvantage?
I did my test in a different car from the one I had done the majority of my lessons in as my original instructor turned out to be a money milking **** (wouldn't teach me my maneuvers so I would have to buy more lessons).
I had only had maybe 2 or 3 hour long lessons in the car I did my test in and managed to pass first time, so it is possible.
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Knalchemist
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Make sure if you're going to your test in your mums car that you practice.

I had lessons with an instructor... but after I booked my test, she had a invitation thing to go on to Deal or No Deal so, instead of taking me on my test, she goes to her DOND interview.

I had to drive a smaller car, and only had the hour before the lesson. I was so put off, and I ended up failing
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GooglyEyedMonster
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Generally, instructors cars are 'easier' to drive as they are usually diesel (harder to stall) and good engine size. Switching to your mums car will be a big difference. And 2 weeks is not that long. Well, less than 2 weeks now.

You also need to consider insurance as if you are currently insured on your mums car, it may not cover your for your test. Its needs to be 'insured for purpose' and many insurance companies won't cover this, and if they do it may be an extra cost.

Also need to check examiner is happy to do it in the car because of not knowing the standard of maintenance and lack of dual control. Your mum, if its her car/insurance will need to accompany you with evidence of up-to-date MOT and relevant insurance documents.

I would say just stick with your instructor. You are familiar with the car and he/she will be able to best advise you of any mistakes you make in practices. Your mum may be a good, safe driver but that doesn't mean she would pass her test now or know what to look for in your driving.

If you were to practice with your mum and next week decide you'd rather your instructors car then you may find he/she already has a lesson booked for when your test is and they won't change it just for you. You will then lose your test fee and need to re-book all over again.

Good luck with your next test.
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sabian92
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I thought all cars used for a test had to be dual controlled?
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Juno
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(Original post by sabian92)
I thought all cars used for a test had to be dual controlled?
you thought wrong then.

Sent from my GT-S5363
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Iqbal007
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(Original post by EB710)
I took my first driving test on Thursday, of which I failed due to lane discipline on a busy roundabout (basically I made someone slow down as I filtered over to leave at the intended exit). Aside from this I only received 3 minors.

With money in mind, I was thinking of taking my next test in my mum's car, without my instructor (so I'd instead take a parent to the test centre). I wouldn't have wanted to do this the first time, but now that I exactly know the test procedure I feel that I would be comfortable with this.

My only concern, and I would have to practice this, is making sure I can do the maneuvers at test standard in my mum's car, which will mean re-learning all the reference points.

My next test is two weeks away from my last test, and I can get a lot of practice in in that time as my dad works from home.

This would save me so much money, however is it realistic? Am I putting myself at a disadvantage?
As everyone else has stated, the extra mirror for the examiner.....your also in my view putting yourself at risk if your about to make a major as the car has no dual controls, as some people panic during such situation and would be harder for the examiner to intervene.
And another thing is the insurance, temporary one day insurance, could cause money issue there depending on the car and everything.
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sabian92
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(Original post by Juno)
you thought wrong then.

Sent from my GT-S5363
Alright, no need to be a little ***** about it.
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HP94
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I did my test in my own car last Tuesday and passed first time.

My driving instructor changed his car about a week before my test and as I had been driving my own car for about 3 weeks I decided this was a more realistic option.

Admittedly I did have 2 lessons in my own car prior to my test and an hour before but I still think this is a realistic idea. I learnt in a nissan micra and I didn't notice the maneuver reference points to be any different to that of my ford Ka.

On the day of my test I took my MOT certificates, car ownership details, tax etc. and they didn't ask to see any of it, just asked me to sign to say I had valid insurance.

There is a list of requirements on the DSA website and also a list of cars that are not allowed to be used for the practical test.

I say go for it, good luck!
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knowledgenow
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You may have valid insurance to drive the car , but the driving test sheet you sign is to state that you are insured to do the driving test in that car. As you can't name the person in charge of the vehicle (the examiner) then you are in effect uninsured. You need to check with your insurance company before doing the test in your own car, to make certain that the policy covers the driving test. In most cases this will not be the case and it could cost alot of money. If you were to have a crash on the test, you would be deemed to be driving without valid insurance and be liable for any consequences.
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