How many pages per hour do you read of your law book?

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TheCount.
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#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
...Whilst note-taking?

I feel like it takes me a ridiculous amount of time! About 5 pages an hour is about average for me.
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cliffg
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#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
(Original post by TheCount.)
...Whilst note-taking?

I feel like it takes me a ridiculous amount of time! About 5 pages an hour is about average for me.
I think everyone reads and notes material in their own way. I very often read chapters in text books fairly quickly to try and get the overall framework but I never take notes when I do that. Some areas might be dense and I know I'm not quite getting it all but rather than get bogged down in a few difficult pages, I keep moving on until I finish that chapter or area of law. I might go back then and re-read the difficult parts or sometimes I just leave them until later. This is always a quick read, maybe 1 -2 hours.

Next time I read that material will be for a seminar prep - so I'm looking for answers to specific questions. Then I want to take notes but it's with a particular purpose in mind. So I might spend another 6 or 8 hours going back through bits of the same chapter, looking up other texts, or reading extracts from relevant cases. Maybe you prefer one detailed read and note taking at the same time and first time around.

But yes, I have spent hours on just a couple of pages of Gray & Gray, Elements of Land Law but I've also skimmed through 20 or 30 pages of text in an hour. I suppose it just depends how you approach it.

I think the key question when you open a book and begin to read is; why am I reading this, what do I need to get from it ? The answer to that will probably change how long you spend on it.
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Theflyingbarney
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#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
As above really, normally I tend to whizz through once to try and get a general idea then go back and pick out bits of particular importance/bits that i'm not very clear on. It also depends on the book - some are far easier than others to read! Anyone who's had to use the Zimmermann book (The Law of Obligations) for Civil Law will know what I'm on about...
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TheCount.
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#4
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#4
(Original post by cliffg)
I think everyone reads and notes material in their own way. I very often read chapters in text books fairly quickly to try and get the overall framework but I never take notes when I do that. Some areas might be dense and I know I'm not quite getting it all but rather than get bogged down in a few difficult pages, I keep moving on until I finish that chapter or area of law. I might go back then and re-read the difficult parts or sometimes I just leave them until later. This is always a quick read, maybe 1 -2 hours.

Next time I read that material will be for a seminar prep - so I'm looking for answers to specific questions. Then I want to take notes but it's with a particular purpose in mind. So I might spend another 6 or 8 hours going back through bits of the same chapter, looking up other texts, or reading extracts from relevant cases. Maybe you prefer one detailed read and note taking at the same time and first time around.

But yes, I have spent hours on just a couple of pages of Gray & Gray, Elements of Land Law but I've also skimmed through 20 or 30 pages of text in an hour. I suppose it just depends how you approach it.

I think the key question when you open a book and begin to read is; why am I reading this, what do I need to get from it ? The answer to that will probably change how long you spend on it.
Not a bad way to do it, I may have to try that.

Usually I read a paragraph to get an outline, then i'll read it back slowly, noting the important bits. Then if there are any cases mentioned, i'll usually have a quick look at those too. Probably why it takes me so long.

Oh and yeah it depends for me on the area. Tort I can get through about 10 an hour while note-taking. Commercial is about 4p/h.
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jacketpotato
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#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
I agree with cliffg. There is a lot of material out there, you have to approach it in a sensible way or you will get nowhere. There is no point in just taking notes on everything in the book. Some pages or even entire chapters might not warrant any notes at all: if the material is not likely to be covered in an exam or it is very basic then you probably don't need to take notes on it.

I think a good approach is to read the entire chapter, perhaps even another textbook or some cases as well, before you start making any notes. You can then go back over the material and write your notes in an efficient way. If you start taking notes before you have a general understanding of that area of law you will not be able to identify which parts are the most important and your notes will be difficult to revise from because it won't be clear which points are the most important.
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mousico
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#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
I know this is an old post but it's something I'm struggling with right now as I'm a couple of weeks into year 1. SO MUCH to read and I've been sitting making notes as I go and not getting very far. I think I'll need to adopt the approach you describe, which relieves some stress tbh. At least I know I'll be able to cover the reading list in time for our first pre-seminar workshop.
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Rebecca RoganR
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#7
Report 5 months ago
#7
I note down each and every header in my chapter. I allocate about 1/3 to 1/4 of a page per textbook page for notes. However in my subjects like Property Law it takes me 10 minutes to read each page and 10 minutes to take good notes including break times etc. This is quite long. may i ask what you think of this as Im needing to make my note taking more effecient. Thank you!
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