Archi96
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
Hey, I'm currently studying chemistry, physics, maths (mechanics) and art at AS level, having originally wanted to study architecture at university.

I'm now considering studying engineering, possibly chemical engineering. My biggest worry is the fact that I will not have a full A level in further maths, possibly closing my possibilities of applying to top universities.

Right now, the best I can do is to pick up a further maths AS next year, so I will at least have further maths AS. It's worth noting that I'm not struggling with single maths at all right now, and I have a private tutor for an hour per week. Is it worth (and possible) learning parts of the course to put me at an advantage, using my tutor, and with a lot of hard work? And should I be worried about not having a full A level in further maths?\

Thanks
0
reply
a10
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
(Original post by Archi96)
Hey, I'm currently studying chemistry, physics, maths (mechanics) and art at AS level, having originally wanted to study architecture at university.

I'm now considering studying engineering, possibly chemical engineering. My biggest worry is the fact that I will not have a full A level in further maths, possibly closing my possibilities of applying to top universities.

Right now, the best I can do is to pick up a further maths AS next year, so I will at least have further maths AS. It's worth noting that I'm not struggling with single maths at all right now, and I have a private tutor for an hour per week. Is it worth (and possible) learning parts of the course to put me at an advantage, using my tutor, and with a lot of hard work? And should I be worried about not having a full A level in further maths?\

Thanks
if your doing normal maths you should be fine one question are you considering chemical just because you heard its one of the most paid jobs?
0
reply
Archi96
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#3
if your doing normal maths you should be fine one question are you considering chemical just because you heard its one of the most paid jobs?
Well to be quite honest, I thought it gave a good salary, although I've never believed that it is the most paid job. I would expect that there is easier ways to make better money. Admittedly, I picked this engineering discipline partly because I thought it was financially rewarding, but also because it plays to my main strengths, chemistry, physics and partly maths.

Maybe it would be more helpful if I told you that I gave up on architecture due to the poor salary in comparison to the degree length and work load.
0
reply
a10
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
(Original post by Archi96)
Well to be quite honest, I thought it gave a good salary, although I've never believed that it is the most paid job. I would expect that there is easier ways to make better money. Admittedly, I picked this engineering discipline partly because I thought it was financially rewarding, but also because it plays to my main strengths, chemistry, physics and partly maths.

Maybe it would be more helpful if I told you that I gave up on architecture due to the poor salary in comparison to the degree length and work load.
from what i have heard chemical engineering doesn't involve a lot of chemistry it has some but not a lot don't quote me on this but i think theres more emphasis on material stuff. My main advice would be do what you love, if thats architecture then do that if that chemical then likewise do that, in general tho engineering jobs here in the UK are underpaid thats why a lot of people after getting their degrees move abroad to places like the US, or Canada or Dubai etc as the pay there is much much better.
0
reply
TVIO
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report 8 years ago
#5
Cambridge recommend doing an AS at least (which you are) and doing other stuff to prove your (it's a word now!) I've heard engineering is masses of maths although I think that may have been software/mechanical. I don't know that much about chem engg I'm afraid.
0
reply
lolface32
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 8 years ago
#6
(Original post by TVIO)
Cambridge recommend doing an AS at least (which you are) and doing other stuff to prove your (it's a word now!) I've heard engineering is masses of maths although I think that may have been software/mechanical. I don't know that much about chem engg I'm afraid.
Chemical engineering will have just as much if not even more maths than mechanical bro
3
reply
star10159
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 8 years ago
#7
Further Maths is highly diserable for engineering. Do it as an AS next year and you'll be fine. btw, Chemical engineering is more maths than chemistry.
0
reply
officelinebacker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
(Original post by Archi96)
Hey, I'm currently studying chemistry, physics, maths (mechanics) and art at AS level, having originally wanted to study architecture at university.

I'm now considering studying engineering, possibly chemical engineering. My biggest worry is the fact that I will not have a full A level in further maths, possibly closing my possibilities of applying to top universities.

Right now, the best I can do is to pick up a further maths AS next year, so I will at least have further maths AS. It's worth noting that I'm not struggling with single maths at all right now, and I have a private tutor for an hour per week. Is it worth (and possible) learning parts of the course to put me at an advantage, using my tutor, and with a lot of hard work? And should I be worried about not having a full A level in further maths?\

Thanks
Not a problem at all.

Unless a course specifically states that they require further maths they won't assume that their students have done it.

The maths you cover in your course will start off at about A level and then move onto A level further maths and then further through to a higher level.
0
reply
Archi96
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#9
Ok, thanks for the advice! One last thing, is it worth covering the important parts of further maths with my private tutor? In order to ''bridge'' the gap between A levels and an engineering degree. If so, what topics should I cover?
0
reply
Sakariya G
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 8 years ago
#10
hi im currently studing maths, chemistry, physics, product design & further maths at AS-level

i am stuck between choosing architecture or engineering as a career choice as well

i like both options because they both have mixtures of maths, science and design which are my strong suits but i dont know which one is better.

could you please help me decide which one i should take?
0
reply
Archi96
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#11
hi im currently studing maths, chemistry, physics, product design & further maths at AS-level

i am stuck between choosing architecture or engineering as a career choice as well

i like both options because they both have mixtures of maths, science and design which are my strong suits but i dont know which one is better.

could you please help me decide which one i should take?
Well it's good to know somebody else is like me

Considering I haven't myself decided between the two yet, I'm not the best person to answer, but the main questions I'm asking myself is, would I rather control the aesthetics of a building, or to make things work using maths, logic, and creative thinking? There is an overlap between the two fields, but you can guess which one uses one more.

Also, have you reviewed the types of engineering there are, and which would possibly appeal to you?

Have you done any work experience, or could you do any, which would help you decide?

Do you prefer studying product design, or the maths/sciences?

Which are you better at?

Could you possibly visit university taster days for the relevant degrees?
& perhaps speaking to people studying these degrees at university is a good start.

The question, ''which one is better'' depends on you; you need to weigh up the course contents, understand what is involved in each degree, and then decide, using your current experience of your A level subjects, which one will suit you better, and which one you enjoy.
0
reply
Archi96
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=4EwR5mPov_o <----- Architecture at Cambridge

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWOtHkaptvw <---- Chemical engineering at Bath

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltyJ3DXRli8 <---- Mechanical engineering at Bath

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGbRgbFkFu8 <---- Engineering fields in general

These videos are just examples - just searching engineering and architecture videos will give you an impression of the life in the careers, and also the degrees.
0
reply
Sakariya G
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 8 years ago
#13
(Original post by Archi96)
Well it's good to know somebody else is like me

Considering I haven't myself decided between the two yet, I'm not the best person to answer, but the main questions I'm asking myself is, would I rather control the aesthetics of a building, or to make things work using maths, logic, and creative thinking? There is an overlap between the two fields, but you can guess which one uses one more.

Also, have you reviewed the types of engineering there are, and which would possibly appeal to you?

Have you done any work experience, or could you do any, which would help you decide?

Do you prefer studying product design, or the maths/sciences?

Which are you better at?

Could you possibly visit university taster days for the relevant degrees?
& perhaps speaking to people studying these degrees at university is a good start.

The question, ''which one is better'' depends on you; you need to weigh up the course contents, understand what is involved in each degree, and then decide, using your current experience of your A level subjects, which one will suit you better, and which one you enjoy.
ok thanks for the insight it helped me really much

i am actually interested in aerospace engineering because i love planes and designing them for a living would be great. but i also want to design my own building. architecture is also a good career but it does take longer to get a degree and the rewards for the hard work doesnt seem that rewarding really. thats the main downside for architecture but the career is still attractive to me.

it quite hard to choose but i will use your advice and ask others who are studying engineering/architecture and hopefully it will make my decision easier.
0
reply
Archi96
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#14
i am actually interested in aerospace engineering because i love planes and designing them for a living would be great. but i also want to design my own building. architecture is also a good career but it does take longer to get a degree and the rewards for the hard work doesnt seem that rewarding really. thats the main downside for architecture but the career is still attractive to me.
I agree - I hate to not follow what I enjoy purely because of the poor financial outcome, but you have to take into account these things. Hence why I'm looking to other careers that I would enjoy just as much, but would be more financially rewarding.

You sound like you would really enjoy aerospace engineering. I'm in the air cadets and the studying we do into basic flight principles and the physics behind it is fascinating. Make sure you look into aerospace engineering; research the degree contents, and if you feel you would enjoy committing to it, then you can start to develop your interest from there.
1
reply
precious maro
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#15
Report 8 years ago
#15
guys im in a bit of a situation, and I would love to receive some advice. I have just finished my AS exams(maths, physics, chemistry and biology), I mite be applying for engineering - so I thought picking up further maths nxt year would be a great idea. then I realised that at the time of my application, I wouldn't have achieved a grade on it, since I have just started it. this made me rethink, is it really worth it?- how would it help my application - since I picked it up late, would it be one of my conditional offer? I would love to get advice from anyone who has been in a similar situation, or who know how this works.
0
reply
Reynolds's#
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#16
Report 8 years ago
#16
(Original post by a10)
from what i have heard chemical engineering doesn't involve a lot of chemistry it has some but not a lot
I fell for the 'title trap' of chemical engineering . Should have done more research on the course. But I don't regret doing it.

What's mechanical engineering like btw? I applied for mechanical engineering during A2.
0
reply
Goldenpresh1
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
But I’m still worried, what if they set a questions concerning further maths which I know nothing about, how will I pass the test😔
0
reply
Vikingninja
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by Goldenpresh1)
But I’m still worried, what if they set a questions concerning further maths which I know nothing about, how will I pass the test😔
What do you mean?
1
reply
elpe
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 days ago
#19
(Original post by Sakariya G)
ok thanks for the insight it helped me really much

i am actually interested in aerospace engineering because i love planes and designing them for a living would be great. but i also want to design my own building. architecture is also a good career but it does take longer to get a degree and the rewards for the hard work doesnt seem that rewarding really. thats the main downside for architecture but the career is still attractive to me.

it quite hard to choose but i will use your advice and ask others who are studying engineering/architecture and hopefully it will make my decision easier.
This is practically my situation right now. I'm not sure whether or not i should do further maths a level as I'm looking at engineering, aerospace or architecture for the future. What did you guys end up doing?
0
reply
SebastianMesser
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#20
Report 5 days ago
#20
(Original post by Sakariya G)
i like both options because they both have mixtures of maths, science and design which are my strong suits but i dont know which one is better.

could you please help me decide which one i should take?
Architecture is a general Arts degree in the UK - it is my Uni Open Day ‘party trick’ to show you all of the maths you will require in under 60 seconds using a pen, but no paper…

If you are motivated by money (and I’m not judging at all - people are motivated by all sorts of different things) then don’t do architecture… as a sweeping-generalisation, if you are emotionally or creatively satisfied by your job, then you will receive less financial compensation for doing it!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (2)
5.71%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (7)
20%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (4)
11.43%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (3)
8.57%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (11)
31.43%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (8)
22.86%

Watched Threads

View All