Sam_McCaur
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
Hello. I applied for EEE and received an offer. However, I need to know more about EEE from the Engineers themselves or those who are more acquainted with the major before I can firm the EEE offer. How is it, Do you enjoy, Employment opportunities, the salary ofcourse, etc you know the drill. Thanks
0
reply
OllieGCSEs
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
I can't really help with your question, but may i ask what your offer was and where it was from? I was hoping to apply for EEE and was curious what their offers are like


This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
0
reply
Sam_McCaur
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#3
From Loughborough University , AAB, EEE MEng with Placement Year.
0
reply
YGB Jammy
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
I'm a second year EE student at the University of Bristol. I'm not going to beat around the bush here; it's a tough degree. Be prepared for a lot of maths, and I don't just mean lots of maths units. Be prepared for maths you've learnt only at Uni to crop up in all units.

There's a fair bit of practical work also which is good fun and quite rewarding when it all works properly! It's a good course if you're motivated and interested in all the topics, however if you're not 100% applied you will struggle. No one in my yeargroup (around 80-100 people) got a first in their first year so that shows how tough it is. However like I said before if you're legitimately interested in the subject you'll be okay as you'll be motivated to learn.

Employment opportunities are generally really good, a lot of companies will come to the university rather than students having to go to them, which shows how in demand we are. However I would say that 60% of graduate schemes require a 2:1 and the other 40% need a 2:2 which adds an unwanted pressure, as you feel that if you come out with a third you may as well have not done it!
On the point of salary, if you get a 2:2 or 2:1 and get on a large company's grad training scheme you're probs looking at starting salary of £22kish, pretty damn good! After you're fully trained with them I would guess it would increase to nearer 30k. After that the sky's your limit on how high in the company/management you want to go.
3
reply
Sam_McCaur
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#5
Thanks, that was quite insightful and helpful. I love and enjoy math so I can try to handle. The females are they coping? (I am a girl).
0
reply
History98
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 8 years ago
#6
(Original post by Sam_McCaur)
Thanks, that was quite insightful and helpful. I love and enjoy math so I can try to handle. The females are they coping? (I am a girl).
Why would you doubt females? There are about 6 females on my EE course and they all seem to be doing just fine.
0
reply
Sam_McCaur
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#7
(Original post by History98)
Why would you doubt females? There are about 6 females on my EE course and they all seem to be doing just fine.
I am not doubting anybody, Im just doubting myself. If they cant cope, the chances are that I cant cope too Punch me for my low self confidence, but I've seen alot of my fellow brothers struggling. Since your doing EEE please do add more info
0
reply
History98
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
(Original post by Sam_McCaur)
I am not doubting anybody, Im just doubting myself. If they cant cope, the chances are that I cant cope too Punch me for my low self confidence, but I've seen alot of my fellow brothers struggling. Since your doing EEE please do add more info
The "YGB Jammy" guy has pretty much covered most of it, it's a hard course that needs a lot of work to be put into it if you want to succeed.My school isn't as stingy with marks as Bristol though, a considerable number were able to pull off firsts last year (not that it was easy).If you work hard and stay interested in the course you will be just fine, if you lose your work ethic or your interest in the subject you will perish.
2
reply
kplissonneau
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
A note on employment. The degree makes you a very attractive candidate for a wide range of sectors not just electrical/electronic related, e.g. half the Imperial graduates go into the City (sad but true) and hence drive up the average graduate starting salary to something like 27k. But really if you take advantage of the opportunities for summer internships throughout the course, no matter which uni, then you're set up pretty soon after.

As above, it's tough, (you'll probably get to know the all-nighter pretty well). 2nd year for us is 30hrs timetabled a week, 9-6 three days, and then there's a group project, humanities coursework, problem sheets, programming assignments, communication essays/presentations.

Getting a part time job is generally a no go area.

Labs. Basically you realise that nothing really works as it's sposed to, but interesting some of the time e.g. 2nd year last term we designed and programmed an amega microcontroller circuit to read in currents and voltages from a bulb, and then send this wirelessly over the Zigbee protocol to a server in the lab, which relayed the data to the networked computers (i.e we created a wireless monitoring system with live data accessible from anywhere in college).

And we're now using the stuff we learnt on wireless data transmission in our group project (a home monitoring system for elderly people with diseases like dementia which uses sensors (mostly accelerometers) around their house to transmit data about their daily living to a central basestation which processes/interprets the data and informs the carer (via daily text update/upload to internet) whether they're still in good health, or emergency contact if they fall. We got to submit proposals for the project at the start of the year. So yes, interesting.

You just have to be incredibly organised and focused slash not have much of a social life.
slash I really don't have time to be writing this.....
2
reply
3 Phase Duck
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
EEE at bath.

I'll narrow it down, first year is maths, physics, circuit theory, programming and a basic engineering project, fairly hard but you only need to pass to get into year 2. From year 2 onwards it's hell!!!!!


Lol no really it's not too bad. At my uni there is a lot of content, and lot of projects and assignments etc and there are times it takes a hit on your social life and you feel lecturers are giving you the most impossible asignment/task just to troll you into a mental breakdown , however, if you're canny about it you can easily cope.

Employment wise, well there is always a need for engineers, especially EEE based.
0
reply
Cowzo
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
I graduated last summer with a 2:1 Beng(Hons) from RGU.

I found the course horrendously stressful, especially in the final 2 years. At the same time though, when I finished a project the sense of achievement was brilliant. Sometimes though when I had 4 pieces of coursework due at the same time and it was issued quite late in the semester it started to get to me a bit. There were a few periods where I was constantly doing 12 hour days. In the end though it paid off.

I had a week off after my final exam before starting work. Almost everyone in my class (there was maybe about 20 of us in total doing a mix of BEng and MEng) has a job in the oil industry now as EEE is high demand. Starting salaries in my class in the oil industry ranges from 27k to 39k . I landed an offshore role that typically doesn't necessarily require a degree. My annual salary is considerably less but I get a bonus for everyday offshore which makes up for it (when I'm onshore I don't really have to go to work).
0
reply
Sam_McCaur
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#12
Coooool stuff! Sounds tough really, it gets the fainthearted worried though.
0
reply
KW681
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
2 universities have said that they think I could go straight onto the main Electronic engineering without doing a foundation year, but I'm a bit wary because I don't have A-Level physics.

Can anybody who is doing/done the degree tell me if A-level physics is essential for the course and if I'm likely to struggle without it?
0
reply
kplissonneau
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 7 years ago
#14
I wouldn't say essential, maths is far more important. Quite a few on my course (imperial)) didn't have it (I think they did chemistry though which is pretty useless for the course apart from understanding some bits of how semiconductor devices work in terms of electron states). All the courses start you from scratch but it is useful to have concepts of fields and electricity to start with, which you don't need a foundation year to pick up. Quite a lot of unis do require it though, but maths and further maths plus another decent a level is just as good if not better. You'll come to love complex numbers believe me.
0
reply
KW681
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
(Original post by kplissonneau)
I wouldn't say essential, maths is far more important. Quite a few on my course (imperial)) didn't have it (I think they did chemistry though which is pretty useless for the course apart from understanding some bits of how semiconductor devices work in terms of electron states). All the courses start you from scratch but it is useful to have concepts of fields and electricity to start with, which you don't need a foundation year to pick up. Quite a lot of unis do require it though, but maths and further maths plus another decent a level is just as good if not better. You'll come to love complex numbers believe me.
I have A-Level Maths and ICT and I could use my time off until September to learn some of the things you just mentioned, so I'll probably go straight onto the first year of the course. Thanks very much.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
a10
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#16
Report 7 years ago
#16
(Original post by kplissonneau)
I wouldn't say essential, maths is far more important. Quite a few on my course (imperial)) didn't have it (I think they did chemistry though which is pretty useless for the course apart from understanding some bits of how semiconductor devices work in terms of electron states). All the courses start you from scratch but it is useful to have concepts of fields and electricity to start with, which you don't need a foundation year to pick up. Quite a lot of unis do require it though, but maths and further maths plus another decent a level is just as good if not better. You'll come to love complex numbers believe me.
good ol complex numbers and polar coordinates
0
reply
Malawi
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report 7 years ago
#17
(Original post by kplissonneau)
A note on employment. The degree makes you a very attractive candidate for a wide range of sectors not just electrical/electronic related, e.g. half the Imperial graduates go into the City (sad but true) and hence drive up the average graduate starting salary to something like 27k. But really if you take advantage of the opportunities for summer internships throughout the course, no matter which uni, then you're set up pretty soon after.

As above, it's tough, (you'll probably get to know the all-nighter pretty well). 2nd year for us is 30hrs timetabled a week, 9-6 three days, and then there's a group project, humanities coursework, problem sheets, programming assignments, communication essays/presentations.

Getting a part time job is generally a no go area.

Labs. Basically you realise that nothing really works as it's sposed to, but interesting some of the time e.g. 2nd year last term we designed and programmed an amega microcontroller circuit to read in currents and voltages from a bulb, and then send this wirelessly over the Zigbee protocol to a server in the lab, which relayed the data to the networked computers (i.e we created a wireless monitoring system with live data accessible from anywhere in college).

And we're now using the stuff we learnt on wireless data transmission in our group project (a home monitoring system for elderly people with diseases like dementia which uses sensors (mostly accelerometers) around their house to transmit data about their daily living to a central basestation which processes/interprets the data and informs the carer (via daily text update/upload to internet) whether they're still in good health, or emergency contact if they fall. We got to submit proposals for the project at the start of the year. So yes, interesting.

You just have to be incredibly organised and focused slash not have much of a social life.
slash I really don't have time to be writing this.....
Would you says its it fine to work on weeksends because if your parents can't lend you money, how would you pay rent and buy food if you don't work?
0
reply
3 Phase Duck
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 years ago
#18
(Original post by Malawi)
Would you says its it fine to work on weeksends because if your parents can't lend you money, how would you pay rent and buy food if you don't work?
I personally work summers and just save pretty much every penny I can.
0
reply
Tomtom :)
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 months ago
#19
Hello, I’m Thomas. I will take the higher national diploma in electrical engineering. I’m currently studying electrical engineering. We study physics a lot but little maths. In electrical engineering we work on alternating and direct current. In electrical engineering we also work on computers to program systems in devices. I chose to study electrical engineering because I’m mad of everything related to the field of electricity. I also like working on computers, to program on software. I chose electrical engineering because I come from engineering science and I liked it. I really liked the electrical part much more than the mechanical part. The wiring of the devices is very interesting. I have never wired a device. I’m keen of the theory but also the practice. Handling of devices is fantastic. I like to connect electrical plugs. What can you do with an electrical engineering diploma? What is the average salary after obtaining this diploma? Can we move on to something totally different? I mean, can you do a job other than an electrician?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (331)
55.72%
I don't have everything I need (263)
44.28%

Watched Threads

View All