Is the IT industry too competitive for Graduates?

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Vibenation
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Just asking, since some people say that the competition in the IT job market is too much and tell me not to go to university this year. I know you need experience and extra accredited courses like CompTIA + or Microsoft qualifications. Which I plan on doing to gain some standing for myself. But for anyone who did an IT related degree like Computing, Computer Science or Computer System Engineering. How are you finding life after graduating?

It be good to hear some good stories.
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Skeppy
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What I'd like to know is an employer more likely to go with someone who has certificates like COMPTIA over someone with a degree.. I mean if the job is entry level are they really going to want an over qualified person? some employers dont like employing over qualified people for entry level jobs... I plan to get a qualification in IT to hopefully get me in at entry level.. Im hoping this guy I know can get me some work experience too.
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ttoby
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(Original post by Skeppy)
What I'd like to know is an employer more likely to go with someone who has certificates like COMPTIA over someone with a degree.. I mean if the job is entry level are they really going to want an over qualified person? some employers dont like employing over qualified people for entry level jobs... I plan to get a qualification in IT to hopefully get me in at entry level.. Im hoping this guy I know can get me some work experience too.
I suppose it depends on what subject the degree was in, and how directly relevant it was to the job. If it isn't then the degree would provide mostly soft skills so the person would need to start off at entry level but advance quickly.

If the degree covers what's required and more, then surely they would just be better at the job as they would be able to solve more issues quicker without having to go away and ask other people.
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Skeppy
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(Original post by ttoby)
I suppose it depends on what subject the degree was in, and how directly relevant it was to the job. If it isn't then the degree would provide mostly soft skills so the person would need to start off at entry level but advance quickly.

If the degree covers what's required and more, then surely they would just be better at the job as they would be able to solve more issues quicker without having to go away and ask other people.
Seems obvious doesnt it... but I've been to interviews where employers have said "your over qualified and would get bored with the job quickly" so they then employed someone with minimal qualifications. In a way I cant blame them, they want someone who is gonna stick around, if you have a law degree and you go for an interview in a sandwich shop chances are you stand less chance than someone with no law degree.
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Vibenation
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(Original post by Skeppy)
Seems obvious doesnt it... but I've been to interviews where employers have said "your over qualified and would get bored with the job quickly" so they then employed someone with minimal qualifications. In a way I cant blame them, they want someone who is gonna stick around, if you have a law degree and you go for an interview in a sandwich shop chances are you stand less chance than someone with no law degree.
How about people who have a degree plus CompTIA, I understand that technician is a entry level job but that varies between the employer. To massive business like banks or college, they would want someone with in depth knowledge and be able to work under pressure. I seen vacancies for 2nd and 3rd line IT support and it usually that they want people educated at degree level. People who done degree prove that they can stick around since they stick to their studies for 3 years that good enough to prove dedication.

I met someone who in charge of all the vocational apprenticeship in the IT and Business in Sheffield and I told him about me going to university and he said that they way to go.
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Vibenation
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(Original post by Skeppy)
Seems obvious doesnt it... but I've been to interviews where employers have said "your over qualified and would get bored with the job quickly" so they then employed someone with minimal qualifications. In a way I cant blame them, they want someone who is gonna stick around, if you have a law degree and you go for an interview in a sandwich shop chances are you stand less chance than someone with no law degree.
If you are under 25, consider apprenticeship. You get these qualifications and the experience and if the company keeps you on. You will be on a full time wage around £15,000 band. People who are 19 to 24 years get partial funding which means you have to pay £400 but if you are over 25 years. You would have to pay £2700.
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sabian92
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It does beg the question - why bother doing a degree if any starting position in the industry won't employ somebody because they're "too clever".
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Skeppy
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(Original post by Vibenation)
If you are under 25, consider apprenticeship. You get these qualifications and the experience and if the company keeps you on. You will be on a full time wage around £15,000 band. People who are 19 to 24 years get partial funding which means you have to pay £400 but if you are over 25 years. You would have to pay £2700.
Do you know the rough pricing of a COMPTIA A+ cert?
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Vibenation
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(Original post by Skeppy)
Do you know the rough pricing of a COMPTIA A+ cert?
You looking at £800 including exam fees for reasonable prices. In my area, I found £800 as the usual prices but places like London and Manchester could be cheaper. Price range is £500 - £1000.
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The_Internet
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(Original post by sabian92)
It does beg the question - why bother doing a degree if any starting position in the industry won't employ somebody because they're "too clever".
You go to other companies? I mean my degree covers a lot of the practical aspects of work, and they encourage us to go for the qualifications
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Skeppy
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(Original post by Vibenation)
You looking at £800 including exam fees for reasonable prices. In my area, I found £800 as the usual prices but places like London and Manchester could be cheaper. Price range is £500 - £1000.
I manged to find some online courses here http://www.e-careers.co.uk/comptia dont know if it will be worthy but its ALOT cheaper
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Vibenation
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(Original post by Skeppy)
I manged to find some online courses here http://www.e-careers.co.uk/comptia dont know if it will be worthy but its ALOT cheaper
Thanks alot, CompTIA and MCTS for £667 is a nice price. I found a CompTIA course for £500 I might consider that one since I ain't good with online courses.

Hope it all goes well for you with getting into IT career.
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Skeppy
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(Original post by Vibenation)
Thanks alot, CompTIA and MCTS for £667 is a nice price. I found a CompTIA course for £500 I might consider that one since I ain't good with online courses.

Hope it all goes well for you with getting into IT career.
No probs... I guess another option could be to self teach CompTIA? through books etc then just paying for the exams? I mean there must be enough free material out there to do this...
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Quady
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(Original post by sabian92)
It does beg the question - why bother doing a degree if any starting position in the industry won't employ somebody because they're "too clever".
Are you suggesting IBM, HP, MS, ACN don't have grad schemes? Let alone wont take on graduates...?
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Skeppy
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(Original post by Quady)
Are you suggesting IBM, HP, MS, ACN don't have grad schemes? Let alone wont take on graduates...?
We are talking mainly about entry level jobs in IT

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Eternity Flame
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It industry is not good now... Too many people doing samething ...
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biffyclyro27
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It depends what you are trying to do, but to be honest I wouldn't say the market is that competitive. It's more that there is a serious lack of any candidates with relevant work experience. Not to mention the fact that a huge amount of people just want to 'work in IT', which is like saying I want to work in Business. It's a huge subject with endless possibilities, you're much better off targeting a specific market/industry. For example, become a consultant in a specialist and desirable area.

(Original post by sabian92)
It does beg the question - why bother doing a degree if any starting position in the industry won't employ somebody because they're "too clever".
Maybe because the jobs they are applying for are not intended for someone with such a high level of qualification/experience. i.e. the candidate is not aiming high enough, and probably has the knowledge to get more than just an entry level job.
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sabian92
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(Original post by biffyclyro27)
Maybe because the jobs they are applying for are not intended for someone with such a high level of qualification/experience. i.e. the candidate is not aiming high enough, and probably has the knowledge to get more than just an entry level job.
But then you get into the problem of "no job because of no experience, but no experience because of no job".

When I graduate, I don't plan on walking into a 30k a year IT security job straight away, but I want somebody to employ me and I have to start somewhere.
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biffyclyro27
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(Original post by sabian92)
But then you get into the problem of "no job because of no experience, but no experience because of no job".

When I graduate, I don't plan on walking into a 30k a year IT security job straight away, but I want somebody to employ me and I have to start somewhere.
There are other ways of gaining experience, like voluntary work. Or organising temporary summer work in the IT industry.

Personally, I chose to do a sandwhich course with a year in industry. Employers are more keen to hire people without experience if they are paying less for it, and there's a chance of them coming back after graduation. More people should consider it, I wouldn't have my job now if I hadn't done a year in industry.
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CJKay
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Sandwich year degrees are pretty much your best bet for getting a job on the industry I believe. I'm just hoping mine goes well.
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