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university reputations - need advice watch

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    (Original post by Tednol)
    The Guardian have their league table for economics here:

    http://education.guardian.co.uk/high...665241,00.html

    1. Oxford
    2. Cambridge
    3. LSE
    4. Birmingham
    5. UCL
    6. Oxford Brookes
    7. Durham
    8. York
    9. Manchester
    10. Warwick

    12. Bristol

    20. Nottingham

    28. Bath

    Have a look. No real suprises I'd say.
    Oh common, you no yourself from first glance that those rankings are utterly outrageous. I doubt the recruiters from Microsoft and the like use those rankings. The times and sunday times give a better idea.
    Places like Bristol (though crap for econ), Nottingham and Bath attract top employers and command great respect.
    According to the guy who gave the speech at Nottingham the 'ivy league' of UK economics in no particular order include:
    Cam, LSE, UCL, Notts, Warwick, Essex?, York and 1 or 2 others.
    Manchester and Birmingaham were a tier below.
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    (Original post by James_W)
    No real surprises? The likes of Oxford Brookes above Nottingham, Bristol, Warwick and Bath surprised me.
    Oxford Brookes is a great up and coming university. I believe it's history department was recently rated higher than Oxford's... caused a stir in the ivory towers!
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    (Original post by WilliamFoster)
    Oh common, you no yourself from first glance that those rankings are utterly outrageous. I doubt the recruiters from Microsoft and the like use those rankings. The times and sunday times give a better idea.
    Places like Bristol (though crap for econ), Nottingham and Bath attract top employers and command great respect.
    According to the guy who gave the speech at Nottingham the 'ivy league' of UK economics in no particular order include:
    Cam, LSE, UCL, Notts, Warwick, Essex?, York and 1 or 2 others.
    Manchester and Birmingaham were a tier below.
    You seem to have an issue with things not conforming to your pre/misconceptions.
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    (Original post by Econ)
    I tend use tables with caution and as a rough guide only - I am however interested in student opinion - What's the views on Manchester for Economics? Reputable? Good department? Anyone heard or know anything?
    I'm doing economics at Manchester, so feel free to PM me with any questions. One of the main reasons I chose Manchester is because it was recommended to me by my economics teacher at school. He is quite old and experienced, and said in all his time teaching not a single former student had done economics at Manchester and had a bad thing to say. They all have been very successful since leaving too.
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    (Original post by Tednol)
    I'm doing economics at Manchester, so feel free to PM me with any questions. One of the main reasons I chose Manchester is because it was recommended to me by my economics teacher at school. He is quite old and experienced, and said in all his time teaching not a single former student had done economics at Manchester and had a bad thing to say. They all have been very successful since leaving too.
    hey at manchester its abit wweird that they call their bsc Econ economics studies while the straight economics is a ba? :confused:
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    (Original post by Leekey)
    I love Manchester so Im going to reccommend it very higly indeed. I think the uni will be a huge player in education after the merger and (on a slightly less biased not) the accounting, finance and economics courses at Manc are supposed to be very good. I don't know anyone studying economics there personally but I think its a well respected course from what people seem to say...
    I agree. Post-merger UoM will be an immense force in UK higher education.
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    hey at manchester its abit wweird that they call their bsc Econ economics studies while the straight economics is a ba? :confused:
    Think you've got a big confused. The BSc is for people who know they want to specialise in the field of economics.

    The BA Econ degree is not, as it appears, a straight economics degree. It is a flexible social science degree. You'd be on the BA Econ degree even if you were doing politics, or anthropology. It's up to you completely what direction you want your degree to take.
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    (Original post by Tednol)
    Think you've got a big confused. The BSc is for people who know they want to specialise in the field of economics.

    The BA Econ degree is not, as it appears, a straight economics degree. It is a flexible social science degree. You'd be on the BA Econ degree even if you were doing politics, or anthropology. It's up to you completely what direction you want your degree to take.
    I know I want to take a straight economics degree with only core modules but I couldn't apply to the BEconSc as they require Maths A'level at grade B as a prerequisite and I dropped it at AS.

    I was under the impression that L100 Ba Econ was a straight Economics degree - the other areas within the department have different course codes. Doesn't it just work that regardless of what area within the BA Econ you applied to you have the choice at the end of the first year to change which area you specialise in. So if you continue doing economics over the 3 years then you would remain on the L100 straight Economics degree? If you decided you liked politics then you could move onto the straight Politics degree. Is this right?

    How does certification work within the BA Econ? Does someone who say takes politics, sociology etc still get the same certification as I would specialising in Economics? It seems stupid that someone could study sociology for 3 years and still come out with the BA Econ - does the specialist area just get certified after the BAEcon generalisation e.g. BA Econ - Economics, or Ba Econ - Politics and Sociology?
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    (Original post by Econ)
    I know I want to take a straight economics degree with only core modules but I couldn't apply to the BEconSc as they require Maths A'level at grade B as a prerequisite and I dropped it at AS.

    I was under the impression that L100 Ba Econ was a straight Economics degree - the other areas within the department have different course codes. Doesn't it just work that regardless of what area within the BA Econ you applied to you have the choice at the end of the first year to change which area you specialise in. So if you continue doing economics over the 3 years then you would remain on the L100 straight Economics degree? If you decided you liked politics then you could move onto the straight Politics degree. Is this right?

    How does certification work within the BA Econ? Does someone who say takes politics, sociology etc still get the same certification as I would specialising in Economics? It seems stupid that someone could study sociology for 3 years and still come out with the BA Econ - does the specialist area just get certified after the BAEcon generalisation e.g. BA Econ - Economics, or Ba Econ - Politics and Sociology?
    L100 will get you on the same degree as someone applying to do politics. You are merely expressing a preference of which route you want to take in the second and third years.

    Everyone on BA Econ does a common first year regardless of where they intend to specialise. That is, everyone does some economics, some politics etc. In the second and third years you can specialise as much as you want be it in business, management, economics, politics, philosophy, whatever.

    Regards certification, you will have a BA Econ degree regardless of how you specialised. But bear in mind all employers will ask to see your module marks when you apply for a job, so they will know how you have covered. The BA Econ is a massive degree - it is well known by all graduate employers.
 
 
 
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