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    how does Wilfred Owen go against the saying that it is sweet and proper to die for your country?
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    u only have to read 1 of his poems to answer this eg anthem for doomed youth.
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    (Original post by Angie)
    how does Wilfred Owen go against the saying that it is sweet and proper to die for your country?
    He goes against it my showing the reality of war in Anthem for a doomed youth

    What passing-bells for those who die as cattle?
    Only the montrous anger of the guns,
    Only the stuttering rifles rapid rattle
    ...
    The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells


    Merely looking at the langauge he uses you can see how he presents the reality of WWI - the horror, the noise, the death - this language directly go against 'sweet'. Also the whole idea of this being 'proper' is undermined through the idea of 'cattle' the dehumanisation effect, cannon fodder not dying for honour or country but as the fodder for your country.

    Also the latter end of Athem for a doomed Youth, Owen focuses on who actually cares, the people back in Britian they see the saddness and horror of everything and doesn't represent it being 'proper'

    What candles may be held to speed them all?
    Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
    Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes


    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by Angie)
    how does Wilfred Owen go against the saying that it is sweet and proper to die for your country?
    Just read 'Dulce et Decorum est' which is where that line 'It is sweet and fitting to die for your country' is mentioned and it will become obvious that is is self explanatory through the vivid nightmarish images he portrayed using various different poetic techniques and the descriptive language he used amongst other things. 'Dulce et Decorum est pro patri mori', the last line of the poem 'Dulce et Decorum est' is latin for 'It is sweet and fitting to die for your country' and this poem sums up his grievences towards this point of view very well!
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    (Original post by corey)
    He goes against it my showing the reality of war in Anthem for a doomed youth

    What passing-bells for those who die as cattle?
    Only the montrous anger of the guns,
    Only the stuttering rifles rapid rattle
    ...
    The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells


    Merely looking at the langauge he uses you can see how he presents the reality of WWI - the horror, the noise, the death - this language directly go against 'sweet'. Also the whole idea of this being 'proper' is undermined through the idea of 'cattle' the dehumanisation effect, cannon fodder not dying for honour or country but as the fodder for your country.

    Also the latter end of Athem for a doomed Youth, Owen focuses on who actually cares, the people back in Britian they see the saddness and horror of everything and doesn't represent it being 'proper'


    Thanks for your help.

    What candles may be held to speed them all?
    Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
    Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes


    Hope this helps.
 
 
 
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