PGCE - Want to leave teaching...advice please Watch

Bexxxx
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#21
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The job is stipidly challenging, yes. I went through the same emotions and am now halfway through my NQT year, STILL having these emotions. However, I have to say that my school is very supportive, and all experienced staff have promised us NQT's that it will get better. It will get easier in all senses as you get more experienced, like in any job. I also have to point out that our NQT meetings are actually quite informative and we have never been told HOW we need to teach, or that certain things would be bad. Instead, we have experienced teachers admit to us that THEY struggle with certain elements - which is refreshing to hear. We have had a few meetings where I have laughed the whole way through, and I think the support from fellow NQT's and colleagues in my school is what has kept me going.

I don't know if I can give you any advice, as you seem to have made your mind up. But what I would say, is continue training and get your qualification. If you decide then NOT to teach, at least you have it there for the future if you ever want to come back.
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Bexxxx
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Also bare in mind that during your NQT year, you're alone in the classroom and it will be YOUR classroom, you can teach how you wish. No formal lesson plans! In the words of my (amazing) HoD "Sometimes you have to stick a video on...". (And it's an outstanding dept, BAM!)
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Clip
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Moan, moan, moan
Can I share a secret with you?

All jobs are like that.

Whether you're in teaching or engineering or legal services or toasting paninis at Starbucks - all jobs involve seemingly absurd targets, absurd meetings, absurd management.

Everyone thinks they know best, and that everyone else is crazy and idiotic. If you choose your career on the basis that you think you won't like the things that go around it (the paperwork etc) then you are on a hiding to nothing with your next choice.
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John Mullen
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(Original post by Clip)
useless, unhelpful, rubbish
How incredibly informative!
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John Mullen
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(Original post by Bexxxx)
The job is stipidly challenging, yes. I went through the same emotions and am now halfway through my NQT year, STILL having these emotions. However, I have to say that my school is very supportive, and all experienced staff have promised us NQT's that it will get better. It will get easier in all senses as you get more experienced, like in any job. I also have to point out that our NQT meetings are actually quite informative and we have never been told HOW we need to teach, or that certain things would be bad. Instead, we have experienced teachers admit to us that THEY struggle with certain elements - which is refreshing to hear. We have had a few meetings where I have laughed the whole way through, and I think the support from fellow NQT's and colleagues in my school is what has kept me going.

I don't know if I can give you any advice, as you seem to have made your mind up. But what I would say, is continue training and get your qualification. If you decide then NOT to teach, at least you have it there for the future if you ever want to come back.
To be honest, If I did get the qualification and came back years later, I wouldn't feel confident diving into full-time teaching straight away anyway. I would rather start at the beginning and gain confidence first. Diving in after years out of the classroom and having trained years ago does not seem a wise move
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Clip
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(Original post by John Mullen)
How incredibly informative!
On second thought - I think you should stay in teaching. Half the profession are lazy, incompetent space cadets with no appreciation of life outside the public sector gravy train. The mothership is calling you.
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Broadhallian
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When I google want to quit PGCE - March, this thread came up, I read the opening post and started to wonder if I posted on here while half asleep recently as I am exactly the same as the first poster.

I am doing maths as well, and I have lost all motivation for the course.

My first placement was a disaster, the kids loved me and I think my lessons were good. My mentor and HOD however......bullied me. Shouted at in front of the kids, shouted at in the corridor, HOD complaining about me to my mentor in front of the kids. On my first day I was told that I got the children too excited and they should all be working silently............

I'm in my new placement now, and I can't be arsed. The first one has destroyed all confidence I had, all desire I had, and I am 100% delighted that I have quit the course.

The straw that broke the camels back was being told by my mentor that I have 90 minutes to teach the children about reflection and rotation....................I can do that in 10 minutes with these kids and she wants me to draw out a lesson for 90 minutes on reflection and rotation. Why can't I stretch their minds and imagination by teaching them about complex numbers or game theory or golden ratio or breaking codes? Rotation and reflection? Really? The week after that was bearings.....When do I get to start teaching children proper maths??


Now I have left I feel like the weight of the world has lifted from my shoulders. I can watch football at night without feeling guilty, I can go out on a Saturday and not worry about being hungover on Sunday. Teaching wasn't for me in the end, everyone I have spoken to except my mum and dad have told me I have made a terrible decision. There are things more important in life than a career and money. Going into school every day was killing me, and this was because of the adults not the kids.

I do realise though that I put a lot of pressure on myself, I don't like letting people down, so when I feel like I have a bad lesson or even if one kid hasn't looked happy I am hard on myself that I didn't do a good enough job.

I applaud anyone who wants to be a teacher, but quite simply, it's not for me, now it's just added to the list of things I don't want to do for work.
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Lexi99
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(Original post by Broadhallian)
When I google want to quit PGCE - March, this thread came up, I read the opening post and started to wonder if I posted on here while half asleep recently as I am exactly the same as the first poster.

I am doing maths as well, and I have lost all motivation for the course.

My first placement was a disaster, the kids loved me and I think my lessons were good. My mentor and HOD however......bullied me. Shouted at in front of the kids, shouted at in the corridor, HOD complaining about me to my mentor in front of the kids. On my first day I was told that I got the children too excited and they should all be working silently............

I'm in my new placement now, and I can't be arsed. The first one has destroyed all confidence I had, all desire I had, and I am 100% delighted that I have quit the course.

The straw that broke the camels back was being told by my mentor that I have 90 minutes to teach the children about reflection and rotation....................I can do that in 10 minutes with these kids and she wants me to draw out a lesson for 90 minutes on reflection and rotation. Why can't I stretch their minds and imagination by teaching them about complex numbers or game theory or golden ratio or breaking codes? Rotation and reflection? Really? The week after that was bearings.....When do I get to start teaching children proper maths??


Now I have left I feel like the weight of the world has lifted from my shoulders. I can watch football at night without feeling guilty, I can go out on a Saturday and not worry about being hungover on Sunday. Teaching wasn't for me in the end, everyone I have spoken to except my mum and dad have told me I have made a terrible decision. There are things more important in life than a career and money. Going into school every day was killing me, and this was because of the adults not the kids.

I do realise though that I put a lot of pressure on myself, I don't like letting people down, so when I feel like I have a bad lesson or even if one kid hasn't looked happy I am hard on myself that I didn't do a good enough job.

I applaud anyone who wants to be a teacher, but quite simply, it's not for me, now it's just added to the list of things I don't want to do for work.
So have you actually left or are you going to finish the course then leave teaching? What happened with all the loans and stuff?

I have no intention of going into teaching, stacking shelves and cleaning toilets would be preferable to this but ive been convinced to get the qual anyway.

Do you feel like starting and not finishing was a bit of a waste of time?
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Shatners bassoon
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Have you conisdered the independent sector? Lots of freedom, chalk and talk/textbooks perfectly fine as pupils can generally concentrate, no starters/plenaries unless you want them, no ofsted obsession, no learning walks, no use of words like "outstanding" or "inadequate", no NC levels, few observations, longer holidays, more money (usually), little paperwork, good behaviour. Basically you would get to teach your subject and help pupils learn without all the rest of the crap involved in state education.
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Broadhallian
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(Original post by Lexi99)
So have you actually left or are you going to finish the course then leave teaching? What happened with all the loans and stuff?

I have no intention of going into teaching, stacking shelves and cleaning toilets would be preferable to this but ive been convinced to get the qual anyway.

Do you feel like starting and not finishing was a bit of a waste of time?
Im waiting 3 more days to get my final bursary payment. A friend on the course who left back in December assured me that the bursary doesn't have to be paid back but the student loan that is given to you to cover the part of the month you won't be studying will have to be which is around £200.

As for waste of time, not really I paid of my student overdraft and now have a nice bit of money in my bank which I never had before. I now know that I don't want to do teaching and I can put it down to experience and carry on with my life. I only have 5 more years left until I'm 30, I don't want to waste the next 4 months of my life teaching when I can be travelling around europe and head back to my hold job in Austria that I loved.


I won't use the qualification, it becomes obsolete in 5 years if you don't do your NQT apparently, I'm going to spend the next 5 years travelling the world and going back to teaching children how to kayak and sail on summer camps.

It's the systems loss that I won't be a teacher but I saw too much I hated in my first school...A senior team leader or whatever they call themselves to boost their egos pulled a mentally ill boy (repeatedly wanted to kill himself) out of the classroom before yelling in his face and two members of staff didn't want to report her because it would make there time at the school difficult.


Have you conisdered the independent sector? Lots of freedom, chalk and talk/textbooks perfectly fine as pupils can generally concentrate, no starters/plenaries unless you want them, no ofsted obsession, no learning walks, no use of words like "outstanding" or "inadequate", no NC levels, few observations, longer holidays, more money (usually), little paperwork, good behaviour. Basically you would get to teach your subject and help pupils learn without all the rest of the crap involved in state education.
No. The independent sector goes against what I believe a society should be and is not something I would even consider doing.

I'm not sure why anyone would want to do this job, I know teachers talk about how much they love their holidays, but I don't know about the rest of you but I spent my holidays working or worrying about the lessons, all the qualified teachers seemed the same. I have spent the last 4 months on edge, I haven't been able to switch off, maybe if I had more supportive mentors then it would have been easier. It dawned on me 3 weeks back when we had mock interviews at university to prepare us for a job and a question was put to me what are my strengths? The last 4 months, I was not told one thing that I was strong at while teaching.

I hate that school, on the last day of term, 10 minutes before the bell went, I was waiting at the school gate looking at my watch. I feel sorry for the children who have to go there, but I shouldn't have been sent to a school that was under special measures from OFSTED and had had a whole host of complaints from previous PGCE students, so I am a little annoyed at the university.
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John Mullen
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#31
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(Original post by Shatners bassoon)
Have you conisdered the independent sector? Lots of freedom, chalk and talk/textbooks perfectly fine as pupils can generally concentrate, no starters/plenaries unless you want them, no ofsted obsession, no learning walks, no use of words like "outstanding" or "inadequate", no NC levels, few observations, longer holidays, more money (usually), little paperwork, good behaviour. Basically you would get to teach your subject and help pupils learn without all the rest of the crap involved in state education.
How many of these jobs are there though for maths? is there a massive demand, like in the state sector? I doubt you could just walk into a role like that.
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John Mullen
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Broadhallian)

My first placement was a disaster, the kids loved me and I think my lessons were good. My mentor and HOD however......bullied me. Shouted at in front of the kids, shouted at in the corridor, HOD complaining about me to my mentor in front of the kids. On my first day I was told that I got the children too excited and they should all be working silently............

I'm in my new placement now, and I can't be arsed. The first one has destroyed all confidence I had, all desire I had, and I am 100% delighted that I have quit the course.

The straw that broke the camels back was being told by my mentor that I have 90 minutes to teach the children about reflection and rotation....................I can do that in 10 minutes with these kids and she wants me to draw out a lesson for 90 minutes on reflection and rotation. Why can't I stretch their minds and imagination by teaching them about complex numbers or game theory or golden ratio or breaking codes? Rotation and reflection? Really? The week after that was bearings.....When do I get to start teaching children proper maths??


Now I have left I feel like the weight of the world has lifted from my shoulders. I can watch football at night without feeling guilty, I can go out on a Saturday and not worry about being hungover on Sunday. Teaching wasn't for me in the end, everyone I have spoken to except my mum and dad have told me I have made a terrible decision. There are things more important in life than a career and money. Going into school every day was killing me, and this was because of the adults not the kids.

I do realise though that I put a lot of pressure on myself, I don't like letting people down, so when I feel like I have a bad lesson or even if one kid hasn't looked happy I am hard on myself that I didn't do a good enough job.

I applaud anyone who wants to be a teacher, but quite simply, it's not for me, now it's just added to the list of things I don't want to do for work.
1) Sounds like a damn awful school. My first placement was ok, 2nd one they dont want you using powerpoint, mathswatch, textbooks - everything must be all singing all dancing. You can't do anything right in the lessonsm even the colour ink you use is criticised if not black!

2) Everything is based around exams, grades, pass, target, level etc. Extra things like complex numbers, golden ratio is not in the GCSE exam, so schools dont include it at all. It is a shame, but that is how it is. This and the constant desire for 'outstanding' by ofsteds standards ruins the whole experience. Not to mention the ridiculous paperwork - 4 hours to plan 1 lesson - where does the time come from? I need to sleep at night!
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StarBabyCat
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#33
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Some people are reluctant to make the jump into the independent sector although it is something I would seriously consider. I think you can get a bit 'stuck' and will have trouble trying to return to the state sector. Of course, you may not want to!

I'm not sure if you can complete your NQT induction in a private school, because technically you don't need to be qualified anyway so I don't know how it works.

Also, there are fewer private senior schools around than state secondaries!
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StarBabyCat
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John Mullen are you still sticking with it?


And how can you NOT use PowerPoint, but not a textbook either?!?!?
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The_Last_Melon
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If you can't chalk and talk in maths what the hell can you do? That's the only way I learned.
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Paul PTS
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Hi all,

Pull up a chair, this is going to be a good one.

I am now halfway through (as near as damn it) my PGCE, and in all honesty I should have left at christmas. I was full of enthusiasm going into september, being able to talk about my subject (Maths) on a daily basis, interacting with the kids, teaching things how I wanted to teach things and really enjoying helping the kids to learn.

It is just a nightmare. I have little freedom in my teaching. You must have a starter, you must have a plenary (I hate the things), you must use millions of different stupid activities (chalk and talk or using textbooks are a no-no according to these ofsted driven robots). You must do everything possible to engage these youngsters in something they have no desire to do at all. Any talk of SEN demoralizes me. I wanted to teach Maths! I am not Merlin the Magician!

I am really disillusioned with teaching as a whole. Has anyone got any useful advice to give me? I am still young and just want to leave the course and do something completely different. I don't see the point of staying on for another 5 months, I don't want to teach anymore.
I'm from another country.
I'm just as you. :cry: I also thought that it's interesting to work in education at the start of this year... But now... I'm thinking about joining police, as soon as I get all my documents from the Ministry. Meanwhile I have to work 7 days a week (in education). Except teaching - I need to arrange different activities, make lot's of documents. And the most awful task - to visit all the officials around and make the contracts, which concern educational questions. So I teach 4 days a week (Saturday and Sunday - always), two days I visit the officials, and one day I make the documents. I also have to visit all the educational activities of others and the same time to be in another part of the city, meeting with the officials and so on. Not long ago I found out myself in situation when I had to be in three places the same time and everywhere - in five minute time. It ended up that I could visit two places of three, which I had to.

The same time it's interesting fact that the average policeman earns twice more than I do. And I myself - Criminal Law PhD.
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Shatners bassoon
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(Original post by John Mullen)



How many of these jobs are there though for maths? is there a massive demand, like in the state sector? I doubt you could just walk into a role like that.
There are quite a few, look through the tes independent senior section, most weeks there are a good 15-20 going, and theyre not as competitive as you might think (my school, a relatively well known one, got 7 applicants for a recent vacancy, of which 4 were anyway suitable, i.e. had some kind of teaching experience), a lot of people rule themselves out either through some sense of morality that says rich pupils shouldnt benefit from their skills too, or through a misplaced fear thattheyre not good enough for these schools. If you want to talk through applying to the independent sector feel free to p.m. Me (im also a maths teacher who left the state system because i was fed up with the beaurocratic bull****..)

As for the person who worries about going back to state and getting trapped, yes you probably will, but not due to the schools themselves, but because hardly anyone who has experienced both sides would ever go back to state, its a different job (and from the sounds of JM's post, independent is basically the job he was expecting when he applied to be a teacher). Also yes you can complete your NQT in most independent schools.
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Paul PTS
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSdtjb2xOow
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elldeegee
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(Original post by Broadhallian)

The straw that broke the camels back was being told by my mentor that I have 90 minutes to teach the children about reflection and rotation....................I can do that in 10 minutes with these kids and she wants me to draw out a lesson for 90 minutes on reflection and rotation. Why can't I stretch their minds and imagination by teaching them about complex numbers or game theory or golden ratio or breaking codes? Rotation and reflection? Really? The week after that was bearings.....When do I get to start teaching children proper maths??

.
What? 10 minutes? for rotation AND reflection? even if i hadn't fumbled with some of my explanations, it would have still taken me the two lessons to teach both of them (one lesson for each of the topics).

Reflection: about axes, about y=a,x=b and about y=x, y=-x
Rotation: explaining about centre of rotation and then having them experiment with finding the centre of rotation.
If they're being taught this, im assuming you were training to teach Secondary - not Alevel. And therefore complex numbers, game theory and all of this so called "proper" maths wouldn't be taught just yet.
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Az12
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Hi, I have read all the comments above and I would like to say to all the people above please don't leave your PGCE, stick with it and preserve trust me! I Know lots of people who started their PGCE dropped and have ever since regretted it. Currently most of them are unemployed and wish they stayed on and had a qualification so that they can teach abroad if not in the UK. Anyway good luck to all of you out there, hope all goes well!
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