PGCE - Want to leave teaching...advice please Watch

Imelda
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(Original post by John Mullen)
I suppose it would just be like starting again though. I don't have any experince of colleges/sixth form colleges, all my experience has been in secondary schools.

I am in such a mess now that the pgce has not worked out. Wanted to defer and just take time away from it to think about what I really wanted but that option was not available at my provider. I have told them I wish to leave but I wonder whether I should make one last ditch effort to see if they will keep me but defer me. I think it is too late though
Ps. It might not be too late; Speak to your provider. They don't want a drop out figure I'm sure plus they can't give the place to anyone else. At worst you might just need to convince them you are committed to completing the course.


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Interrobang
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You'll be starting from scratch whatever you decide to do tho. Try and get experience in sixth form and see if there are any places for September, if you want to do it. Experience in secondary will be better than nothing. At least email admissions tutors and see if they'll accept your application
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SHABANA
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(Original post by Shelly_x)
You could try Teach First. I don't know too much about it, but it seems like you are basically a full teacher once you start in September (or are treated like one anyway) so you might prefer that.
You are also placed in VERY challenging schools - some may be enough to put people off teaching whereas they may have enjoyed it elsewhere.
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Shelly_x
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(Original post by SHABANA)
You are also placed in VERY challenging schools - some may be enough to put people off teaching whereas they may have enjoyed it elsewhere.
Yup, this is true. Though I only suggested it because he wanted some more freedom in how he teaches and thought the PGCE wasn't giving him that.
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John Mullen
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(Original post by Imelda)
Ps. It might not be too late; Speak to your provider. They don't want a drop out figure I'm sure plus they can't give the place to anyone else. At worst you might just need to convince them you are committed to completing the course.


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I have emailed the head of the course, as I still think there must have been an option somewhere to take time out. The subject tutor convinced me that it was carry on with the current placement or leave, but I knew I couldn't carry on without problems arising, and wanted to defer.

It may be too late now, but as you say they can't give the place to someone else, so I have absolutely nothing to lose. I don't know what my legal standing would be as I don't know whether I had any right to take time out.
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Shatners bassoon
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If you are interested in teaching in the independent sector I would recommend sticking with your course. Whilst the lack of QTS won't stop schools employing you if they want to, you will find it easier to get a job with a PGCE, and more importantly you wont have to explain to them why you quit. I think you will have a tough time persuading a school to take you on after leaving a course because you disagreed with certain aspects of it and found the workload tough going..I imagine this will also be true for many other employment sectors you may be interested in moving to.
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John Mullen
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(Original post by Shatners bassoon)
If you are interested in teaching in the independent sector I would recommend sticking with your course. Whilst the lack of QTS won't stop schools employing you if they want to, you will find it easier to get a job with a PGCE, and more importantly you wont have to explain to them why you quit. I think you will have a tough time persuading a school to take you on after leaving a course because you disagreed with certain aspects of it and found the workload tough going..I imagine this will also be true for many other employment sectors you may be interested in moving to.
Well I am making a last ditch effort to sort some kind of deferment out, but I have a feeling it is too late as the withdrawal may have gone through. The tutor convinced me there was no option of deferring which I think is silly as that Is what I desperately needed to get my head straight, prepare properly knowing what the workload was like (having underestimated it before), and generally reassess whether teaching is right for me.

Waiting to hear from the provider at the moment on what they will allow to happen or whether It is too late and I have gone
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rachelsays
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Well I am making a last ditch effort to sort some kind of deferment out, but I have a feeling it is too late as the withdrawal may have gone through. The tutor convinced me there was no option of deferring which I think is silly as that Is what I desperately needed to get my head straight, prepare properly knowing what the workload was like (having underestimated it before), and generally reassess whether teaching is right for me.

Waiting to hear from the provider at the moment on what they will allow to happen or whether It is too late and I have gone
I am a GTP student and I understand where you are coming from. This is one of the 'pressure points' of the year apparently, when all of the reports/parents evening/assessments pile up and everything just starts to become unbearable. I LOVE my job and I LOVE my classes and I LOVE my school and my mentor is AMAZING but despite all of this I am still feeling exhausted and stressed. If I were in a less supportive environment, I would be really struggling to cope.

However, I think this is more about your approach to life than the PGCE workload itself. I remember you on here last year before the course started, and your 'my way or the highway' attitude then concerned me. I have looked at your other recent posts on here and my fears have been completely proven. You blame everybody but yourself for your problems and expect the world to revolve around you, your needs and your desires. How old are you? 12?! I can't imagine what a nightmare you must be to work alongside.

You want to teach 'your way' - which you think, despite only having had a few months' experience - is better than established methodologies that are proven to help children. Can you not see how arrogant that is? You don't see the 'point' in differentiation - so kids who aren't at the same level as their peers just have to sit there and stare out of the window while the content of the lesson goes completely over their heads? Can you not see how narrow minded that attitude is?! I have no idea how you got onto a PGCE course with these ideas.

Teachers exist to get the best out of students - not impose their own whims on them. The days of teachers getting to lecture students on topics of their own choice are over, I'm afraid. I have found that in my GTP year so far I have had loads of my expectations and preconceptions shattered. However, I have been mature enough to recognise that, despite being an older entrant with a lot of work experience under my belt - I don't know it all, I do have a lot to learn, and while I may think a lot of the stuff I'm being asked to do is annoying or pedantic, I can understand why it's done - usually because it helps students. Yes, banging on about targets and how to reach them is boring and restrictive, but you know what? If little Jenny needs an A in English to achieve her dream of going to university, then I'll fill in as many boxes as I need to ensure that she can get there, because at the end of the day, that's my job - to equip kids with what they need to get where they want to go in life. It's not about me. It's about them. And I'm sure that sounds preachy, but I believe it. Kids need teachers who are there for them, not for themselves.

You really need to grow up and start realising that it's not everyone else with the problem - the common denominator in all of your woes is - surprise, surprise - you. It looks like your tutor has recognised this and wants you off the course. He's doing it for your own good, so even though you clearly don't think much of anyone's opinion aside from your own, I'd trust his judgement on this one and quit while you're ahead. The teaching profession isn't going to change to suit you, and as you're not going to change yourself, it's best you leave now.
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malteser87
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Well I am making a last ditch effort to sort some kind of deferment out, but I have a feeling it is too late as the withdrawal may have gone through. The tutor convinced me there was no option of deferring which I think is silly as that Is what I desperately needed to get my head straight, prepare properly knowing what the workload was like (having underestimated it before), and generally reassess whether teaching is right for me.

Waiting to hear from the provider at the moment on what they will allow to happen or whether It is too late and I have gone
Hi, I just read your post. I am a teacher who is currently leaving teaching. I know exactly how you feel, but I am a slight bit older than you. I've been teaching nearly 4 years now and I can tell you, it doesn't get easier. You really have to look deep within yourself to see if this is the right career for you. I decided it wasn't and best to leave now while I'm still young and I won't take too much of a pay cut. My reasoning was that I don't want to be marking books until 9pm and planning outstanding lessons every single night and being observed the whole time. I believe there is a better life out there for me, one that will at least have pay that equals the amount of effort I put in. There is no freedom in teaching, I would advise you to read some of the stories on the TES workplace dilemma forums. It's a hard decision to make, but if you're gonna leave- do it now while you are young.
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John Mullen
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(Original post by malteser87)
Hi, I just read your post. I am a teacher who is currently leaving teaching. I know exactly how you feel, but I am a slight bit older than you. I've been teaching nearly 4 years now and I can tell you, it doesn't get easier. You really have to look deep within yourself to see if this is the right career for you. I decided it wasn't and best to leave now while I'm still young and I won't take too much of a pay cut. My reasoning was that I don't want to be marking books until 9pm and planning outstanding lessons every single night and being observed the whole time. I believe there is a better life out there for me, one that will at least have pay that equals the amount of effort I put in. There is no freedom in teaching, I would advise you to read some of the stories on the TES workplace dilemma forums. It's a hard decision to make, but if you're gonna leave- do it now while you are young.
Thanks for your post.

You sound as if you were being observed an awful lot. I thought that the PGCE was where you are observed 100% of the time, and this reduces to twice a term in the NQT year, and after that would only be a few times a year. I know they now have powers to observe people to death though - is this what happened to you? Did senior management have it in for you?

I agree, the hours and workload is a killer, and won't get better, same as the job will get harder and harder just as life is doing itself.
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malteser87
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Thanks for your post.

You sound as if you were being observed an awful lot. I thought that the PGCE was where you are observed 100% of the time, and this reduces to twice a term in the NQT year, and after that would only be a few times a year. I know they now have powers to observe people to death though - is this what happened to you? Did senior management have it in for you?

I agree, the hours and workload is a killer, and won't get better, same as the job will get harder and harder just as life is doing itself.
Well I wasn't formally observed.. Just the head of faculty kept walking in to my lessons constantly. This is completely different and a completely different atmosphere to where I taught previously. I wouldn't recommend anyone to teach in the British system. If you're going to teach, go to Ireland where you'll be treated like a human being and not a machine. Ireland has a much better system with higher quality exams and grades, and the quality of teaching is better because the teachers are happy and not stressed.
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John Mullen
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(Original post by rachelsays)
I am a GTP student and I understand where you are coming from. This is one of the 'pressure points' of the year apparently, when all of the reports/parents evening/assessments pile up and everything just starts to become unbearable. I LOVE my job and I LOVE my classes and I LOVE my school and my mentor is AMAZING but despite all of this I am still feeling exhausted and stressed. If I were in a less supportive environment, I would be really struggling to cope.

However, I think this is more about your approach to life than the PGCE workload itself. I remember you on here last year before the course started, and your 'my way or the highway' attitude then concerned me. I have looked at your other recent posts on here and my fears have been completely proven. You blame everybody but yourself for your problems and expect the world to revolve around you, your needs and your desires. How old are you? 12?! I can't imagine what a nightmare you must be to work alongside.

You want to teach 'your way' - which you think, despite only having had a few months' experience - is better than established methodologies that are proven to help children. Can you not see how arrogant that is? You don't see the 'point' in differentiation - so kids who aren't at the same level as their peers just have to sit there and stare out of the window while the content of the lesson goes completely over their heads? Can you not see how narrow minded that attitude is?! I have no idea how you got onto a PGCE course with these ideas.

Teachers exist to get the best out of students - not impose their own whims on them. The days of teachers getting to lecture students on topics of their own choice are over, I'm afraid. I have found that in my GTP year so far I have had loads of my expectations and preconceptions shattered. However, I have been mature enough to recognise that, despite being an older entrant with a lot of work experience under my belt - I don't know it all, I do have a lot to learn, and while I may think a lot of the stuff I'm being asked to do is annoying or pedantic, I can understand why it's done - usually because it helps students. Yes, banging on about targets and how to reach them is boring and restrictive, but you know what? If little Jenny needs an A in English to achieve her dream of going to university, then I'll fill in as many boxes as I need to ensure that she can get there, because at the end of the day, that's my job - to equip kids with what they need to get where they want to go in life. It's not about me. It's about them. And I'm sure that sounds preachy, but I believe it. Kids need teachers who are there for them, not for themselves.

You really need to grow up and start realising that it's not everyone else with the problem - the common denominator in all of your woes is - surprise, surprise - you. It looks like your tutor has recognised this and wants you off the course. He's doing it for your own good, so even though you clearly don't think much of anyone's opinion aside from your own, I'd trust his judgement on this one and quit while you're ahead. The teaching profession isn't going to change to suit you, and as you're not going to change yourself, it's best you leave now.
Thanks for posting although I won't comment on personal things.

So if these 'established methodologies' are proven to help children, why is it that our education system is so dire on a world scale, ever since these principles have come about?

You have to remember here that schools these days are exam factories. It is target driven. Passing exams is the aim, schools just pay lip service to the other stuff, and if people don't pass, teachers are accountable. Teachers are accountable for behaviour as well, which could be affected by many different things.

There is certainly a culture of zero-tolerance to not having all boxes ticked, and creativity in lessons goes out of the window in the face of all this. It becomes box ticking, telling kids off and dodging a telling off from senior management. There is nothing wrong with wanting to take a traditional approach, but you are made to feel this is wrong during the training, when we all know that really this stuff about creativity, differentiation, etc. ends up taking a back seat later on.
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John Mullen
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(Original post by malteser87)
Well I wasn't formally observed.. Just the head of faculty kept walking in to my lessons constantly. This is completely different and a completely different atmosphere to where I taught previously. I wouldn't recommend anyone to teach in the British system. If you're going to teach, go to Ireland where you'll be treated like a human being and not a machine. Ireland has a much better system with higher quality exams and grades, and the quality of teaching is better because the teachers are happy and not stressed.
Completely agree. Although it is not just Ireland were things are better, it is globally, as i have just said to another member, take a look at our education system on a global scale. They simply cannot go on about how brilliant teaching in this country is when quite clearly there are major faults with it at the present time.

Some people go in blind to it all, and will be walked all over and tell themselves it is all for the kids benefit, but when you look at the bigger picture, the kids in England are not in any benefit at all!
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malteser87
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Completely agree. Although it is not just Ireland were things are better, it is globally, as i have just said to another member, take a look at our education system on a global scale. They simply cannot go on about how brilliant teaching in this country is when quite clearly there are major faults with it at the present time.

Some people go in blind to it all, and will be walked all over and tell themselves it is all for the kids benefit, but when you look at the bigger picture, the kids in England are not in any benefit at all!
As an Irish teacher who moved here to teach, I see huge problems. The first is they complain about kids growing up so fast here then they pressurise the children to make huge career decisions at 13. Next is the work they're expected to do: Only 1 homework a week?! and we are supposed to mark it? In Ireland all the work is marked in class and class sizes are not over 30. I've a class of 35 here and I'm responsible for all of their work inside the class so if they're not doing work it's my fault. That puts no responsibility on the students and creates the type of learning they have today i.e. they're not learning. Teachers are there to teach, students have to take responsibility for their own learning. The third problem I see is the exam boards. Without a clear cut syllabus that everyone has to work from you lose the consistency that the students have a right to. Lastly, the schemes of work I've had to work from are awful. They're not written for teachers, they're written for Ofsted inspectors. In Ireland I had to write my own schemes of work. That suited me fine as I knew everything that was on the syllabus that way and in what way I felt best to teach it to the students. There were general schemes but every teacher uses their own because they know their subject and what way is best.

The English system is hanging by a thread, the students are not achieving the high standards that other countries are and it's the system's fault because there are many exceptionally bright students out there.
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rachelsays
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Thanks for posting although I won't comment on personal things.

So if these 'established methodologies' are proven to help children, why is it that our education system is so dire on a world scale, ever since these principles have come about?

You have to remember here that schools these days are exam factories. It is target driven. Passing exams is the aim, schools just pay lip service to the other stuff, and if people don't pass, teachers are accountable. Teachers are accountable for behaviour as well, which could be affected by many different things.

There is certainly a culture of zero-tolerance to not having all boxes ticked, and creativity in lessons goes out of the window in the face of all this. It becomes box ticking, telling kids off and dodging a telling off from senior management. There is nothing wrong with wanting to take a traditional approach, but you are made to feel this is wrong during the training, when we all know that really this stuff about creativity, differentiation, etc. ends up taking a back seat later on.
Yes of course you don't want to comment on personal things. You are completely unable to take criticism; which is why your tutor and PGCE mentor and department colleagues all want rid of you.

Everything you're saying is everything that most teachers moan about. You're not unique. Yes, there are boxes to tick. Yes there are pointless initiatives and senior management to please. Yes it is target driven.

But something you will realise when you actually leave university and enter the real world is that ALL JOBS ARE LIKE THIS.

No matter where you work, you will have to cope with all of the things you have moaned about. They're annoying but they're part of the structure of life.

Those of us with brains, passion and initiative find ways to work around the system and bring about positive change within it.

Those who have none of those qualities just spend their lives moaning and talking about how the system is broken, without doing anything to change it.

You are basing your experience of school life on the two very short placements you have done. This is another proof of your narrow minded attitude to life.

In my school, there are targets and boxes and all of the things that you're complaining about. But the colleagues I work with still deliver creative, exciting and innovative lessons and have wonderful relationships with their students. They offer extra curricular activities to widen kids' horizons. They have fun at work because they keep learning and they keep innovating. They don't let the system get them down - they do what's required of them but they do it their way.

Maybe you've been in schools where this doesn't happen. But that doesn't mean that all schools are like that.

There are thousands of teachers who are like the teachers I have been fortunate enough to work with, and they're getting kids through their exams while still teaching them to be brilliant, engaging and inventive people. It is possible.

So stop moaning about what you can't do and think about what you can do. How can you bring about change within the system? How can you work creatively with the strictures you've been given? What alternatives to the current way of doing things could you try?

Or you could just give up and leave, and find a new career.

But I warn you now - with your current attitude, in six months' time, you'll be in exactly the same position.

If you don't change, nothing else will.
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Interrobang
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(Original post by malteser87)
Hi, I just read your post. I am a teacher who is currently leaving teaching. I know exactly how you feel, but I am a slight bit older than you. I've been teaching nearly 4 years now and I can tell you, it doesn't get easier. You really have to look deep within yourself to see if this is the right career for you. I decided it wasn't and best to leave now while I'm still young and I won't take too much of a pay cut. My reasoning was that I don't want to be marking books until 9pm and planning outstanding lessons every single night and being observed the whole time. I believe there is a better life out there for me, one that will at least have pay that equals the amount of effort I put in. There is no freedom in teaching, I would advise you to read some of the stories on the TES workplace dilemma forums. It's a hard decision to make, but if you're gonna leave- do it now while you are young.
Out of interest, what are you moving onto?
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John Mullen
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(Original post by rachelsays)
Yes of course you don't want to comment on personal things. You are completely unable to take criticism; which is why your tutor and PGCE mentor and department colleagues all want rid of you.

Everything you're saying is everything that most teachers moan about. You're not unique. Yes, there are boxes to tick. Yes there are pointless initiatives and senior management to please. Yes it is target driven.

But something you will realise when you actually leave university and enter the real world is that ALL JOBS ARE LIKE THIS.

No matter where you work, you will have to cope with all of the things you have moaned about. They're annoying but they're part of the structure of life.

Those of us with brains, passion and initiative find ways to work around the system and bring about positive change within it.

Those who have none of those qualities just spend their lives moaning and talking about how the system is broken, without doing anything to change it.

You are basing your experience of school life on the two very short placements you have done. This is another proof of your narrow minded attitude to life.

In my school, there are targets and boxes and all of the things that you're complaining about. But the colleagues I work with still deliver creative, exciting and innovative lessons and have wonderful relationships with their students. They offer extra curricular activities to widen kids' horizons. They have fun at work because they keep learning and they keep innovating. They don't let the system get them down - they do what's required of them but they do it their way.

Maybe you've been in schools where this doesn't happen. But that doesn't mean that all schools are like that.

There are thousands of teachers who are like the teachers I have been fortunate enough to work with, and they're getting kids through their exams while still teaching them to be brilliant, engaging and inventive people. It is possible.

So stop moaning about what you can't do and think about what you can do. How can you bring about change within the system? How can you work creatively with the strictures you've been given? What alternatives to the current way of doing things could you try?

Or you could just give up and leave, and find a new career.

But I warn you now - with your current attitude, in six months' time, you'll be in exactly the same position.

If you don't change, nothing else will.
I can't fix it all myself, we as a society need to change the procedures in order to improve. The UK system is way down the list on a global scale. No matter how many of these activities the youngsters get, they are significantly disadvantaged by a system which limits their achievements anyway. New teachers just blindly putting up with everything and getting walked all over brainwashed into this ofsted 'outstanding' mentality, pretending it is for the kids benefit are kidding themselves as they know, these very youngsters enter a global market upon leaving study, and they will be at the back of the queue.

Ofsted outstanding is just for advertisement. It doesn't mean that kids there get any better education than they do at a 'satisfactory' school. Visit these places (I have). There is no difference. If people like me did not stand up to these things, everyone would be convinced that we are on the right track, when we clearly are not.

It needs to come from the top, central government. Bring back traditional teaching, more effective discipline (this culture of giving them loads of chances is farcical), and improve the system.
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malteser87
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(Original post by *Interrobang*)
Out of interest, what are you moving onto?
Still looking at my options but it's most likely going to be down the financial route. (pending a job acceptance)
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rachelsays
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(Original post by John Mullen)
I can't fix it all myself, we as a society need to change the procedures in order to improve. The UK system is way down the list on a global scale. No matter how many of these activities the youngsters get, they are significantly disadvantaged by a system which limits their achievements anyway. New teachers just blindly putting up with everything and getting walked all over brainwashed into this ofsted 'outstanding' mentality, pretending it is for the kids benefit are kidding themselves as they know, these very youngsters enter a global market upon leaving study, and they will be at the back of the queue.

Ofsted outstanding is just for advertisement. It doesn't mean that kids there get any better education than they do at a 'satisfactory' school. Visit these places (I have). There is no difference. If people like me did not stand up to these things, everyone would be convinced that we are on the right track, when we clearly are not.

It needs to come from the top, central government. Bring back traditional teaching, more effective discipline (this culture of giving them loads of chances is farcical), and improve the system.
How are you standing up to all these faults then? You're doing nothing but walking away from them!

Yeah, lecturing at kids and caning them is totally the way forward. That worked so well before, didn't it? Are you aware of how poorly educated the majority of our previous generations were? Kids today have a fantastic education because they are educated to become rounded people with ideas of their own. The latest rankings place us 6th out of all developed countries. Not a sign of a 'failing' system. Those dominating the rankings are Asian countries who have a very different political and cultural environment. If you think our schools are factories, you've seen nothing until you go to Asia!

The vast majority of teachers know that the Ofsted outstanding mentality is a load of tripe. No one's getting walked over or brainwashed. I love how low an opinion you have of the thousands of people who enter teacher training every year. Where have you got these ideas from? Why do you think that teachers live in fear of Ofsted? If they were teaching like the robots Ofsted wanted them to be already, they'd have nothing to be worried about! Schools put on a one day show for Michael Gove and his band of clueless followers and then go back to normal business as soon as they've left.

Again, you are using a very narrow window of experience to generalise the entirety of the UK's school system.

If you don't like what you've seen, do something to change it - one person can make a huge difference in a department, in a school, and so on. If you just want to moan about it, feel free, but you won't find many people to listen to a whinger who blames the world's problems on 'the government' or 'everyone else' without lifting a finger to do anything to change it.
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PhoebeA
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(Original post by John Mullen)
Hi all,

Pull up a chair, this is going to be a good one.

I am now halfway through (as near as damn it) my PGCE, and in all honesty I should have left at christmas. I was full of enthusiasm going into september, being able to talk about my subject (Maths) on a daily basis, interacting with the kids, teaching things how I wanted to teach things and really enjoying helping the kids to learn.

We are now in February, and after spending all of January on the uni parts of the course, bored out of my mind, I am now going into placement 2 with no desire to teach at all. All this course has done is put me off teaching. All the hassle involved with the job makes me want to leave. Pressure, Ofsted, Government moving the goalposts all the time, Behaviour, Workload of marking, planning etc. It just is not my cup of tea. It is not what I want it to be, and not what I thought it would be.

It is just a nightmare. I have little freedom in my teaching. You must have a starter, you must have a plenary (I hate the things), you must use millions of different stupid activities (chalk and talk or using textbooks are a no-no according to these ofsted driven robots). You must do everything possible to engage these youngsters in something they have no desire to do at all. Any talk of SEN demoralizes me. I wanted to teach Maths! I am not Merlin the Magician!

I have no desire at all to be an NQT, and as such have not applied for any jobs. Others on my course seem to be embracing the challenge, but I just don't want the hassle anymore. Ever been to an NQT meeting? There's an experience. The session leader with comments like "that would not be outstanding." and "that would be inadequate". Education is ruled by this desire for 'ofsted outstanding'. The privatisation (academisation) of schools is a worry, as are a number of other things such as changes to pay.

I am really disillusioned with teaching as a whole. Has anyone got any useful advice to give me? I am still young and just want to leave the course and do something completely different. I don't see the point of staying on for another 5 months, I don't want to teach anymore.
Hi,
Just wanted to say I'm really sorry if you're having a crappy time on the PGCE. I quit the PGCE with only six weeks left to go this time last year and haven't regretted it for a moment. This is not to say i'm advocating quitting the moment you start to feel the PGCE is a bit pants; but if you're truly miserable and your health is suffering and you can't face going back to your placement there is a life after the PGCE that isn't entirely doom and gloom!

I finished the course and started volunteering on a literacy programme for offenders and working relief shifts in a rough sleepers hostel. I'm now working for a charity as a tenancy support officer with homeless young people. I spend a lot of time in colleges running housing drop ins, I support young people to access accomodation and visit them for the first six months, I also run a tenancy training course teaching budgeting and independent living skills. The money is absolutely terrible, the job is emotionally and physically very tiring but I couldn't be happier. I would not have got this job without the experience I gained on the PGCE. It taught me that I love working with young people, that I don't particularly get on with a lot of teachers and that quitting something doesn't make you a terrible human being.... and that you may as well stick another 9 grands worth of debt on the student loan pile cause you're never paying it off anyway.

Teachers do a very difficult job and on the whole I have a lot of respect for the good ones, but they can also be very good at making you feel that: a) noone else has ever worked hard and b) the pgce is some sort of gladitorial trial designed to destroy the weak and glorify the smug.

If you ultimately enjoy the course and can see a future in teaching, find the strength in your boots and see it out.
If the thought of spending two hours planning another forty minute lesson on the boring bits of Hamlet makes you wake up at 4am to do a nervous poo then don't beat yourself up over quitting.
There are other equally rewarding, interesting jobs out there, that let you make a real difference to people's lives. If you're doing something you want to do then working hard won't feel like being fed to the lions.

Good luck whatever you decide to do.
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