AQA LITB3 Gothic - 6th June 2013 Watch

zakkaz
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I'm hoping this forum will be as helpful as the AQA LITB1 Retake forum, ask for resources, ask for help post anything you want (provided it's relevant), I'll post as much as I can find.


0
reply
Unsworth
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Looking forward to this exam more than my others, quite enjoying Frankenstein and Macbeth!
1
reply
zakkaz
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by Unsworth)
Looking forward to this exam more than my others, quite enjoying Frankenstein and Macbeth!
Same, finally got my teeth into Wuthering Heights.

I feel this exam is much better than the AS exam!
0
reply
zakkaz
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#4
Hey has anyone got any advice on moving an A grade essay to an A* grade?
0
reply
Unsworth
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by zakkaz)
Hey has anyone got any advice on moving an A grade essay to an A* grade?
To get into the A* band you need to really be evaluating the interpretations that you put forward, along with discussing one or two critical interpretations also. I think this is the thing that commonly stops people entering the top band when doing these essays... unless you did do this?
0
reply
zakkaz
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#6
No, I didn't do that, I just never knew how I could push myself to get the A*. Thanks
0
reply
ILoveTehran
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
This is such a good thread! Thanks
We've finally finished the course now. Just have to hand in my final c/w next week. Anyway, we've done Wuthering Heights, Frankenstein and Doctor Faustus.
My teachers are a bit relaxed now that we've finished the course so they're leaving mocks for after easter
0
reply
ILoveTehran
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by Unsworth)
To get into the A* band you need to really be evaluating the interpretations that you put forward, along with discussing one or two critical interpretations also. I think this is the thing that commonly stops people entering the top band when doing these essays... unless you did do this?
By 'evaluating the interpretation' do you mean I have to discuss why I believe such an interpretation relates to the question for example and the implications that such an interpretation has etc. (Does that make sense) or am I getting in wrong?
0
reply
Unsworth
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by ILoveTehran)
By 'evaluating the interpretation' do you mean I have to discuss why I believe such an interpretation relates to the question for example and the implications that such an interpretation has etc. (Does that make sense) or am I getting in wrong?
No I don't mean evaluating the interpretation in the sense of how it relates to the question. Any interpretation you put forward should relate to the question regardless, otherwise it seems a bit of a waste putting it forward if you are then having to explain why it links to the question in the first place.

What I mean by an interpretation is discussing what something could mean/why the author may have included a certain thing/why something is significant to your point. E.G - Say you were making the point in Frankenstein that Shelley uses homoeroticism in the novel. You can use this as an interpretation, but then say you don't believe this is a strong point, putting forward an alternative interpretation that homosexuality was a taboo subject at the time of writing, so the stronger view is that Shelley in fact uses misogyny throughout the novel, rather then homoeroticism.

So you get AO3 marks for giving different interpretations, then top AO3 marks for evaluating them as in the example I thought of above. Hopefully that makes sense! It's more about why a certain interpretation is strong/more appropriate/more fitting rather then why a certain interpretation relates to the question.
2
reply
ILoveTehran
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Unsworth)
No I don't mean evaluating the interpretation in the sense of how it relates to the question. Any interpretation you put forward should relate to the question regardless, otherwise it seems a bit of a waste putting it forward if you are then having to explain why it links to the question in the first place.

What I mean by an interpretation is discussing what something could mean/why the author may have included a certain thing/why something is significant to your point. E.G - Say you were making the point in Frankenstein that Shelley uses homoeroticism in the novel. You can use this as an interpretation, but then say you don't believe this is a strong point, putting forward an alternative interpretation that homosexuality was a taboo subject at the time of writing, so the stronger view is that Shelley in fact uses misogyny throughout the novel, rather then homoeroticism.

So you get AO3 marks for giving different interpretations, then top AO3 marks for evaluating them as in the example I thought of above. Hopefully that makes sense! It's more about why a certain interpretation is strong/more appropriate/more fitting rather then why a certain interpretation relates to the question.
Thank you. That was a great explanation!
1
reply
IL0veBooks_55
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
Hey I sat this exam in January and got full marks, I think the key to it is absolutely nailing the AOs, it sounds really simplistic but I don't think that this spec allows room for creativity or originality unless the AOs are really clearly signposted.
What I found worked for me was really engaging with the terms of the question, in my intro to both questions I defined the terms set out in the question, and then I integrated the terms in the question into the beginning and ending of every single paragraph I wrote so that all of my points were consistently relevant.

And as Unsworth said, really go to town on evaluation! I tried to link AO2, AO3 and AO4 together, by using contextual evidence in order to evaluate my arguments; I would make a point about language structure and form - suggest how this could be interpreted with regards to the terms set out in the question - and then evaluated them using contextual evidence.

I think students need to go about this paper really methodically, almost mathematically! I also found reading the examiners reports for each session absolutely crucial!
9
reply
zakkaz
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by danielcain-reed)
Hey I sat this exam in January and got full marks, I think the key to it is absolutely nailing the AOs, it sounds really simplistic but I don't think that this spec allows room for creativity or originality unless the AOs are really clearly signposted.
What I found worked for me was really engaging with the terms of the question, in my intro to both questions I defined the terms set out in the question, and then I integrated the terms in the question into the beginning and ending of every single paragraph I wrote so that all of my points were consistently relevant.

And as Unsworth said, really go to town on evaluation! I tried to link AO2, AO3 and AO4 together, by using contextual evidence in order to evaluate my arguments; I would make a point about language structure and form - suggest how this could be interpreted with regards to the terms set out in the question - and then evaluated them using contextual evidence.

I think students need to go about this paper really methodically, almost mathematically! I also found reading the examiners reports for each session absolutely crucial!

Do you have any advice on timing, as this is my main issue. Also would you have any practice responses that we could look at. I have so many top mark responses but I feel like it is important to know the best way to structure your response.

Thanks
0
reply
RKAUR
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
What are the main things we need to learn ? Is it just the knowledge on the books and essay writing?
0
reply
IL0veBooks_55
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
(Original post by zakkaz)
Do you have any advice on timing, as this is my main issue. Also would you have any practice responses that we could look at. I have so many top mark responses but I feel like it is important to know the best way to structure your response.

Thanks

Hey!
With timing, I spent 10 minutes prepping my answers and thought up 4 mini essays/arguments which answered the question. Really important to bullet point a conclusion, so if you do run out of time (like I did with question two) then you can tell the examiner to refer to your plan for which you can still get marks!

I'd be glad to send you some practise responses, I studied Northanger Abbey, Frankenstein and the Pardoner's Tale. What's your e-mail ?
0
reply
IL0veBooks_55
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
(Original post by RKAUR)
What are the main things we need to learn ? Is it just the knowledge on the books and essay writing?
I'd say the MOST important thing is how do your texts fit in with the gothic genre? Within that are obviously more questions, significance of various gothic motifs - and then an application of one of those gothic motifs to a single text.

Essay structure is paramount I think, it's easy to get side tracked and loose marks in spite of a comprehensive knowledge of the text.

READ EXAMINERS REPORTS.
That is the biggest bit of advice I'd give, actually!
0
reply
isadev
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by danielcain-reed)
Hey I sat this exam in January and got full marks, I think the key to it is absolutely nailing the AOs, it sounds really simplistic but I don't think that this spec allows room for creativity or originality unless the AOs are really clearly signposted.
What I found worked for me was really engaging with the terms of the question, in my intro to both questions I defined the terms set out in the question, and then I integrated the terms in the question into the beginning and ending of every single paragraph I wrote so that all of my points were consistently relevant.

And as Unsworth said, really go to town on evaluation! I tried to link AO2, AO3 and AO4 together, by using contextual evidence in order to evaluate my arguments; I would make a point about language structure and form - suggest how this could be interpreted with regards to the terms set out in the question - and then evaluated them using contextual evidence.

I think students need to go about this paper really methodically, almost mathematically! I also found reading the examiners reports for each session absolutely crucial!
Hiya! Do you have any advice on a good way to structure the part b answers? Like should we talk about all 3 texts at the same time or just relate them at the end/beginning of the paragraph ? Sorry it's just our teacher has been a bit useless and isn't really giving us any help so if you have any advice it would be very appreciated
0
reply
IL0veBooks_55
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
(Original post by isadev)
Hiya! Do you have any advice on a good way to structure the part b answers? Like should we talk about all 3 texts at the same time or just relate them at the end/beginning of the paragraph ? Sorry it's just our teacher has been a bit useless and isn't really giving us any help so if you have any advice it would be very appreciated
unlike in Litb1 you need to actually compare and contrast the texts in order to show how each author uses the genre, but you run the risk of not going into too much depth if you are constantly comparing, I find it useful to start each paragraph with a point in relation to the question, then explore that point across your three texts

eg: Authors of gothic literature use recurrent images in order to foreshadow events...
and then I'd give examples from each text, but make them very in depth


Then occasionally I'll just focus on a single text in one paragraph, and go really in depth, and then introduce a new argument by :'In a similar way' or 'Alternatively' etc..
0
reply
zakkaz
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#18
(Original post by danielcain-reed)
Hey I sat this exam in January and got full marks, I think the key to it is absolutely nailing the AOs, it sounds really simplistic but I don't think that this spec allows room for creativity or originality unless the AOs are really clearly signposted.
What I found worked for me was really engaging with the terms of the question, in my intro to both questions I defined the terms set out in the question, and then I integrated the terms in the question into the beginning and ending of every single paragraph I wrote so that all of my points were consistently relevant.

And as Unsworth said, really go to town on evaluation! I tried to link AO2, AO3 and AO4 together, by using contextual evidence in order to evaluate my arguments; I would make a point about language structure and form - suggest how this could be interpreted with regards to the terms set out in the question - and then evaluated them using contextual evidence.

I think students need to go about this paper really methodically, almost mathematically! I also found reading the examiners reports for each session absolutely crucial!
I'm always trying to evaluate but my teachers are telling me I'm getting it all wrong, can you give a small example.
1
reply
IL0veBooks_55
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 years ago
#19
Shelley’s use of language contributes to the evocation of sympathy for the creature. point of paragraph clear from beginningThe archaic and biblical tone used by the creature, indicated by words such as ‘thy’ and ‘doth’evidence liken the form of the novel to that of a prophecylinking language and form together; the creature is presented as a figure of Biblical significance which affirms his self proclaimed role of ‘the fallen angel’. This interpretation suggests that the creature is indeed more sinned against than sinning because the reason for which he is ‘the fallen angel’ is a result of Victor’s negligence and the allusion to Milton’s Paradise Lost likens the creature to Adam, like Adam, the monster was created perfectly and loved those around himevaluating interpretation by comparison to other gothic text. He was not born evil or with the intent to do harm and violence to others, but throughout the novel his emotions overwhelmed his mind, and he committed heinous acts against otherspoint developed. Furthermore, the use of antitheses and oxymoron’s demonstrate the extent of the creature’s sentient mind, the fact that he is ‘thy creature’ and ‘ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel’ confirmssignalling strength of argument this idea as the use of the semicolon contrasts the two opposing analogiesusing language as evidence – whereas the ‘Adam’ to which he refers symbolises the good, the ‘fallen angel’ is a metaphor for the sin which he has committedalternative interpretation. This idea is repeated, for he was ‘benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend’ again the use of the semi colon separates the two juxtaposing ideas which emphasise the creature’s ability to reason morallyfurther examples of my argument. As a moral being it’s difficult to believefinal sentence links back to argument set out at the beginning Frankenstein’s presentation and neglect of his creature, through his references to him as a ‘fiend’ ‘devil’ and ‘abomination’ – words which evoke the inherent evil that Frankenstein accuses his creature of.
2
reply
IL0veBooks_55
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#20
Report 5 years ago
#20
I just pulled that out of one of my essays! By no means perfect, but just a way that I found helpful in addressing all the AOs

Point - succinct evidence - how does the evidence support the point - link to another AOeg: how another text strengthens the argument - evaluate the strengths and/or weaknesses

I tend not to point out the weakness of an argument as I can never do so in a way which strengthens my argument. I find it better to offer a stronger interpretation or an alternative one

hope this is of some help!
2
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Roehampton
    Department of Media, Culture and Language; School of Education; Business School Undergraduate
    Tue, 19 Feb '19
  • Edge Hill University
    Undergraduate and Postgraduate - Campus Tour Undergraduate
    Tue, 19 Feb '19
  • University of Kent
    Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities Further education
    Tue, 19 Feb '19

Do you give blood?

Yes (61)
8.28%
I used to but I don't now (18)
2.44%
No, but I want to start (276)
37.45%
No, I am unable to (177)
24.02%
No, I chose not to (205)
27.82%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise