Driving test in an Automatic

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TheSurgeon345
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Hey,

Was just wondering how many of you TSR folk have an "Automatic-only" driving licence?

I was thinking of doing this.
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TheSurgeon345
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Bumpety boop
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Motorbiker
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(Original post by TheSurgeon345)
Hey,

Was just wondering how many of you TSR folk have an "Automatic-only" driving licence?

I was thinking of doing this.
Not many people and it's not a very common thing.

Tbh learning how to use gears and the clutch is weird at first but you will get used to it quickly and then it's 1000^ more useful to be able to drive manual cars as well as Automatics.

Just imagine when hiring a car, borrowing a friends or trying to buy a new car. Having to discount 90% of the cars since they're auto would give you little choice...
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sabian92
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My best mate is because he has an arthritic knee.

Apparently autos are the new "in" thing according to him and loads of people are going to start buying them. Crock of crap personally.
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Lampoon
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An auto only license is very limiting in the UK. I would recommend that you get a full license at first then buy an auto.
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KCLeblanc
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(Original post by sabian92)
My best mate is because he has an arthritic knee.

Apparently autos are the new "in" thing according to him and loads of people are going to start buying them. Crock of crap personally.
I would say they are getting more common. Traditional automatic gearboxes are complicated and less efficient then a manual. In the last few years we've seen a lot of new auto boxes which are actually more like manual boxes but operated by electronic servos. These are cheaper and don't have the efficiency issues of a traditional auto box.

I would say at least try learning in a manual, I suspect you'll have to provide your own car if you want to have automatic lessons.
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sabian92
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(Original post by KCLeblanc)
I would say they are getting more common. Traditional automatic gearboxes are complicated and less efficient then a manual. In the last few years we've seen a lot of new auto boxes which are actually more like manual boxes but operated by electronic servos. These are cheaper and don't have the efficiency issues of a traditional auto box.

I would say at least try learning in a manual, I suspect you'll have to provide your own car if you want to have automatic lessons.
Not at all, you can get automatic lessons the same as manual ones. My mate is learning in a 107 auto via a normal school and while it benefits him, Ihate autos. I have a manual licence anyway

To be honest, I don't care how good the automatic gearbox is. I like the control of a manual box - far more natural to me.


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Curly_hair_girl
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I do, I have dyspraxia though, so I thought, in an automatic there is one less thing to think about, can spend more attention to actually driving (and not losing the use of one leg after driving for an hour). I came to this conclusion after having some lessons in a manual car. You can get semi automatic (which have additional gears).
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Lampoon
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(Original post by KCLeblanc)
I would say they are getting more common. Traditional automatic gearboxes are complicated and less efficient then a manual. In the last few years we've seen a lot of new auto boxes which are actually more like manual boxes but operated by electronic servos. These are cheaper and don't have the efficiency issues of a traditional auto box.
Do you mean DSGs?

These are far more complex (and expensive) than traditional manuals, and can be worse at stop start driving than both manual and auto boxes.
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ronki23
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(Original post by TheSurgeon345)
Hey,

Was just wondering how many of you TSR folk have an "Automatic-only" driving licence?

I was thinking of doing this.
Depends on the urgency. If you need to drive ASAP and theory test is running out, I recommend doing an auto and do manual in the future, I have had over 80 hours of lessons in manuals and 7 attempts but got auto on second ;p
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sabian92
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(Original post by Curly_hair_girl)
I do, I have dyspraxia though, so I thought, in an automatic there is one less thing to think about, can spend more attention to actually driving (and not losing the use of one leg after driving for an hour). I came to this conclusion after having some lessons in a manual car. You can get semi automatic (which have additional gears).

How dyspraxic are you?

I know it sounds rude; worry not. A fellow dyspraxic over here

I have no issue driving a manual although I can't get the key in the ignition sometimes
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Curly_hair_girl
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(Original post by sabian92)
How dyspraxic are you?

I know it sounds rude; worry not. A fellow dyspraxic over here

I have no issue driving a manual although I can't get the key in the ignition sometimes
No offence. I'm mild, but it's an area where it can manifest.
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sabian92
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(Original post by Curly_hair_girl)
No offence. I'm mild, but it's an area where it can manifest.
Ah okay, I understand. I've heard of a lot of dyspraxics being told to just go for an auto licence as it's "easier" but I never really struggled any more than anybody else I know. I took less time to pass than my brother who has nothing wrong with him! My instructor understood from the start as his nephew was really dyspraxic so it was never an issue. He let me learn as fast as I wanted but understood If I struggled more than others on certain things.

I know it seems like such a daft thing to ask but dyspraxia is something that can affect people in massively different ways so I was just curious, that's all. I really struggle with concentrating, that's my major downfall...





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SuperCat007
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I think unless you have a learning/mental/physical disability/impairment like the above posters (please don't take offense to that, many, many apologies if you do ) then ALWAYS learn in a manual and get a full manual license.

Auto's are more expensive to buy and keep running and despite what people say they aren't anywhere near as fuel efficient as manuals. I know from experience, I knew someone with exactly the same car as me but it only differed on gearbox. Mine easily did 60+ mpg, his did around 55-58 mpg on a good day. Plus it can be a little daunting when you take your foot off the brake and the car just goes, for that reason I'd imagine insurance would be more too.

Basically unless you really need to don't bother getting an auto license, a manual one means you can drive almost anything. e.g. what if in the future you need a mini-bus, 3.5 or 7.5+ tonne license they don't often come as auto's so you'll need to go back and spend more money and time getting your manual license again! It seems scary at first, I never thought I'd get the hang of doing both feet, eyes, brain and hands at the same time but it comes naturally eventually. Plus I think you'll be a better driver for it, you should develop a better understanding of the car and how it works.
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sabian92
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(Original post by SuperCat007)
I think unless you have a learning/mental/physical disability/impairment like the above posters (please don't take offense to that, many, many apologies if you do ) then ALWAYS learn in a manual and get a full manual license.

Auto's are more expensive to buy and keep running and despite what people say they aren't anywhere near as fuel efficient as manuals. I know from experience, I knew someone with exactly the same car as me but it only differed on gearbox. Mine easily did 60+ mpg, his did around 55-58 mpg on a good day. Plus it can be a little daunting when you take your foot off the brake and the car just goes, for that reason I'd imagine insurance would be more too.

Basically unless you really need to don't bother getting an auto license, a manual one means you can drive almost anything. e.g. what if in the future you need a mini-bus, 3.5 or 7.5+ tonne license they don't often come as auto's so you'll need to go back and spend more money and time getting your manual license again! It seems scary at first, I never thought I'd get the hang of doing both feet, eyes, brain and hands at the same time but it comes naturally eventually. Plus I think you'll be a better driver for it, you should develop a better understanding of the car and how it works.
To be honest it can be a combination of all of them, but it can affect different people in vastly different ways. I struggle to walk in a straight line, my gross and fine motor skills are poor at best and I fall over bugger all quite a lot, whereas some dyspraxics struggle to even dress themselves in the right order. It depends on the individual - we qualify for Disability Student Allowance but have to go for a needs assessment to assess exactly what the problem is.


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SuperCat007
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(Original post by sabian92)
To be honest it can be a combination of all of them, but it can affect different people in vastly different ways. I struggle to walk in a straight line, my gross and fine motor skills are poor at best and I fall over bugger all quite a lot, whereas some dyspraxics struggle to even dress themselves in the right order. It depends on the individual - we qualify for Disability Student Allowance but have to go for a needs assessment to assess exactly what the problem is.


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I very much appreciate the difficulties anything like this can cause. I, for example, have Fibromyalgia which is very variable and some days, like today, I am in so much pain I can hardly walk, let alone drive (hence I am sitting on my bed on TSR rather than enjoying the sunshine!). Whilst other days I can go running and play sports. I sincerely hope you didn't take offense to my comment.

In this matter though, unless the OP has extenuating circumstances making an auto license essential (I don't believe they said they did) then a manual license is always the way to go. Otherwise you cut yourself off and you will end up paying more money in the end.
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SuperCat007
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(Original post by ronki23)
Depends on the urgency. If you need to drive ASAP and theory test is running out, I recommend doing an auto and do manual in the future, I have had over 80 hours of lessons in manuals and 7 attempts but got auto on second ;p
Also WOW :eek: 80 hours of lessons and 7 tests! Have you taken a break of 2-3 months and tried again? I had a friend who couldn't pass 9 attempts, all fails! Then he took 4 months off and on the next try (6 months later) he passed first time, sometimes it takes time for it to sink in!
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sabian92
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(Original post by SuperCat007)
I very much appreciate the difficulties anything like this can cause. I, for example, have Fibromyalgia which is very variable and some days, like today, I am in so much pain I can hardly walk, let alone drive (hence I am sitting on my bed on TSR rather than enjoying the sunshine!). Whilst other days I can go running and play sports. I sincerely hope you didn't take offense to my comment.

In this matter though, unless the OP has extenuating circumstances making an auto license essential (I don't believe they said they did) then a manual license is always the way to go. Otherwise you cut yourself off and you will end up paying more money in the end.
No, not at all. I'm used to people not knowing what it is as it's not that common.

It can be a pain but you just deal with it. I'm sure you're the same with having fibromyalgia - you either let it live with you, or you live with it.
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ronki23
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(Original post by SuperCat007)
Also WOW :eek: 80 hours of lessons and 7 tests! Have you taken a break of 2-3 months and tried again? I had a friend who couldn't pass 9 attempts, all fails! Then he took 4 months off and on the next try (6 months later) he passed first time, sometimes it takes time for it to sink in!
Did 30 hours then went to driving practice with parent as we thought the recommendation of 60-70 was too much. Then went to another instructor from October-Dec and Feb-May. In that time we lost count so that'd be around 60 I guess as those were 2 hours instead of 1. First attempt was 2 majors, second was SIX. Then had new guy May-Nov and had 3 attempts (2-4 majors each time) so i'm sure that was over 100 lol. Had the same guy again Jan-March and failed with ONE major and 3 minors, the major I thought was harsh as it was on roundabout and the lines crossing over confused me, apparently went to wrong lane and the guy behind had to change. Last instructor March-May, FOUR MAJORS!!! That was SEVEN ATTEMPTS AT MANUAL AND ALMOST PASSED ONE!!!!!

Practiced with parent again and failed auto first time in July (was trying to creep up to line at junction and go closer to the curb, examiner thought I was trying to go); one major and two minors. Had another attempt 2 weeks later, no major but THIRTEEN MINORS, in line parking car wheel was just on the line and was a whisker away from the wall.

So robbed of a manual and auto on two attempts but got the last one by the skin of my teeth. Would like to do manual again though
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Spawns
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I passed my test in an automatic, I had done around 10 lessons in a manual beforehand and, although I could drive it and understood it all, I just didn't like it. So I tried an automatic and preferred it a lot more. You'll find a lot of people putting down automatic cars have never actually used an automatic so you can't really take much on their opinion.

It's all down to preference, I didn't like manuals so went with automatic. You may be the same, you may be different, only way is to find out first hand
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