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    does any1 know any detailed science why the rate of reaction of enzyme activity increases as concentration of hydrogen peroxide increases. please I need some very detailed scientific knowledge.
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    Textbook would help alot.
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    the textboks don't have very detailed explanation
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    (Original post by coolguy)
    does any1 know any detailed science why the rate of reaction of enzyme activity increases as concentration of hydrogen peroxide increases. please I need some very detailed scientific knowledge.
    Surely it would depend on which enzyme - Clearly the enzyme you described reached optimum activity levels as hydrogen peroxide concentration was increased, up to a certain point presumably, as an excessive concentration may have no effect after a certain point. It may even denature the enzyme if it was absurdly concentrated.

    BTW: Why the fuc* do I know this when:

    a.) I dropped Biology at GCSE
    b.) I hate Biology
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    (Original post by coolguy)
    does any1 know any detailed science why the rate of reaction of enzyme activity increases as concentration of hydrogen peroxide increases. please I need some very detailed scientific knowledge.
    Depend on the enzyme! Not all enzyme activity increases in H2O2!!!!
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    FOR A level, "detailed description" = textbook style
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    would it have something to do with the enzymes from your stomach and the acidity of hperoxide mimicing the conditions there? or something?
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    (Original post by 2776)
    FOR A level, "detailed description" = textbook style
    But proportionality between rate of enzyme activity and hydrogen peroxide concentration levels would surely only apply to specific enzymes?
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    (Original post by bono)
    But proportionality between rate of enzyme activity and hydrogen peroxide concentration levels would surely only apply to specific enzymes?
    Of course. I was talking more int eh general direction of the phrase "detailed scientific knowledge"
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    this thread reminds me of the fact i should begin my central concepts revision (i've decided to retake it to get a higher A)
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    I am using liver
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    Of course. I was talking more int eh general direction of the phrase "detailed scientific knowledge"
    Problem is, I bet at that person's shool (mine as well hehe) they talk about enzymes as if there is only one type of enzyme and that is that.

    They probably don't emphasize the fact that there is a multitude of enzymes that have different purposes and are stimulated to function at optimum levels by various factors.

    I.e.) In the stomach the protease enzyme Pepsin performs more efficiently (tending to optimum rate) as the concentration of Hyrochloric Acid increases. This is certainly not the case for the majority of enzymes as high acidity levels would usually denature them.

    BTW: Why on earth do I randomly know this stuff? :confused:
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    (Original post by bono)
    Problem is, I bet at that person's shool (mine as well hehe) they talk about enzymes as if there is only one type of enzyme and that is that.

    They probably don't emphasize the fact that there is a multitude of enzymes that have different purposes and are stimulated to function at optimum levels by various factors.

    I.e.) In the stomach the protease enzyme Pepsin performs more efficiently (tending to optimum rate) as the concentration of Hyrochloric Acid increases. This is certainly not the case for the majority of enzymes as high acidity levels would usually denature them.

    BTW: Why on earth do I randomly know this stuff? :confused:
    Well yeah. Thats all basic enzyme theory. Surely everyone doing the biology A level knows that!
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    (Original post by coolguy)
    I am using liver
    I'm pretty sure the enzyme that acts on hydrogen peroxide is CATALASE....it produces a gas (can't quite remember which one i'm afraid) as the H2O2 is broken down....so you use this to measure the progress of the reaction.

    G
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    (Original post by 2776)
    Well yeah. Thats all basic enzyme theory. Surely everyone doing the biology A level knows that!
    But it seems the intial thread starter did not distinguish which enzyme they were referring to, hence they may not even realise that increasing hydroge peroxide levels will only have a positive effect on certain enzyme(s).
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    (Original post by 2776)
    Well yeah. Thats all basic enzyme theory. Surely everyone doing the biology A level knows that!

    I think the point bono was making was that he isn't even doing A-Level bio!
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    I think the point bono was making was that he isn't even doing A-Level bio!
    I think 2776 knows this, I think he was saying that the thread starter should know the details that I explained in my earlier posts. To be fair, they really should.
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    (Original post by gzftan)
    I'm pretty sure the enzyme that acts on hydrogen peroxide is CATALASE....it produces a gas (can't quite remember which one i'm afraid) as the H2O2 is broken down....so you use this to measure the progress of the reaction.

    G
    The gas produced is Oxygen
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    (Original post by LS.)
    The gas produced is Oxygen
    Cheers...i remember now...

    2H2O2 ---> 2H2O + O2

    G
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    (Original post by gzftan)
    Cheers...i remember now...

    2H2O2 ---> 2H2O + O2

    G
    Catalase is one of many enzymes that can break down H2O2. Another important thing (if talking catalase) is that if the fenton reaction does not go to completion, you can gererate free radicals galore. Not good if you're DNA; a cell wall; a protien etc.
 
 
 
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