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    Im going to put this in TL;DR summary as its a long story and Im on my phone.

    - Did well at GCSE (2A's 6B's and 2 C's)

    - Went to sixthform.

    - Did ok in Year 12.

    - Completely messed up year 13 due to alcoholism and generally going off the rails.

    - Left sixthform with a C, E and U.

    - On dole for 6 months. Got depression. Drinking problem got worse.

    - Worked in wetherspoons 5 months

    -Got job as community care worker for elderly.

    - Currently work nights as the Night Warden of a sheltered accomodation for elderly people. Been in care work for 2 years, but was always supposed to be an "intrerim job" until I sorted myself out.

    Ive only recently sorted out the depression and still working on alcohol issues.

    So Im trying to figure out what I need to do to be competitive in the job market but its hard now that Im over 18 as all the programmes for school leavers are for under 19's and all the good apprenticeships that I'd be interested in require decent A-Levels.

    Whats my best option to get into university. The only thing Ive come up with is a foundation year. Is that my best option?

    I absolutely do not want to go back and do A-Levels.

    Thanks.

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    Get an apprenticeship, by looking at your grades, your not very academic, so if your perseverant enough, you can become a tube driver or train driver, if living in London then tube driver, as it can earn you up to 60k per year, and train drivers earn slightly less but still good for someone with poor grades
    If you really want to go to uni, apply to something like london met, or machester met.
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    I've already established why my A-Levels are so bad, and that all the worthwhile apprenticeships that I'd be interested in require good A-Levels. Its not that I'm not acedemic, Its that I had issues to deal with when I was 17.

    If you think my GCSEs are "poor" then I don't think you could possibly help me with this.

    And I certainly wouldn't want to move to London, of all places, to become a tube driver. I'm not sure you read the thread.

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    Why don't you want to do A-levels? Surely there is some kind of program that allows you to finish them in one year. Your GCSE grades are not bad, mines are not much better (only 2 A*) so pick strong subjects (like Math would be perfect although it depends on what you like).
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    Its just going back and doing them, I'd have to do them distance learning as I cant afford to stop working and pay to go to community college.

    Was thinking of doing a foundation year at uni which basically just adds an extra year to your studies.

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    Cambridge Pre-U Foundation summer schools rather than a year/ A-levels.
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    (Original post by WannabeCrypto)
    Its just going back and doing them, I'd have to do them distance learning as I cant afford to stop working and pay to go to community college.

    Was thinking of doing a foundation year at uni which basically just adds an extra year to your studies.

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    A foundation year would be a good option, though it would depend what kind of course you want to do because not all courses have foundation years. It is typically science/engineering courses that do.
    Have a look around. You may find that some want good A level grades, these are designed for people who have taken the wrong subjects not for people with few UCAS points. My boyfriend has one C at A level and is on an engineering foundation year at York now so its possible
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    What about an access course? They're pretty much designed for people in your situation, I think?
    http://www.accesstohe.ac.uk/FAQ/students.asp#q5
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    (Original post by Gnome :))
    What about an access course? They're pretty much designed for people in your situation, I think?
    http://www.accesstohe.ac.uk/FAQ/students.asp#q5
    Whats the price range for courses such as this? Ive looked into them before but to do them I'd definately have to stop working because they're very intensive.

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    (Original post by WannabeCrypto)
    Whats the price range for courses such as this? Ive looked into them before but to do them I'd definately have to stop working because they're very intensive.

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    From the website:
    Getting financial help to study

    You’ll need to think carefully about your finances before you take an Access to HE course. Our advice is to contact the Access to HE course provider well in advance to discuss your situation.
    There are two areas of finance that you’ll need to consider: course fees and living costs. Many Access to HE students don’t have to pay course fees and, depending on your circumstances, you may be able to get financial help towards the costs of your learning, and related costs like travel and childcare.
    If I were you, I'd do a quick Google on the places near you that offer such courses and see what they entail. I do know that they are very intensive and you may have to give up work, or significantly reduce your hours (again, that would be something to discuss with the course providers). However, if you are passionate about going to university, you probably will have to make sacrifices.
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    You've got two main options to consider if redoing your A-levels is a definite no-go.

    1) You could do an Access course which takes 1 year full time and many colleges offer them in different areas, you can choose the area of study which best fits what you'd like to do at university. You may have to pay for it out of your earnings though.

    2) You can apply to do a foundation year at university to bring you up to speed, which usually requires a certain amount of UCAS points (your A-level grades give you 120 UCAS points). Not all universities and not all courses have a foundation year, so you'll have to consider where you'd like to go and what you'd like to study carefully before applying. Student finance can cover a foundation year plus the three year degree course, so you won't need to save up for this.
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    Ok, Thanks all.

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    (Original post by WannabeCrypto)
    Ok, Thanks all.

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    I only skipped through the replies after reading your post but can't believe no one mentioned it - sorry if someone did! -, but the Open University is almost begging you to join.

    Of course, you didn't say what you were wanting to go into, so help is limited. But nevertheless, you can do it over a period of time, and you may even be able to get help from your employer for certain degrees: http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergr...sing/index.htm.

    I wouldn't advise going to a campus University with your past issues. Drinking is a huge part of social life, and it can be an intense and sometimes lonely experience which may exacerbate your depression, etc.

    Additionally, lots of Universities are now beginning to offer full courses, long distance, such as Aberdeen and the social sciences: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/lifelonglearni...ocial-science/

    And my University, Essex: http://online.essex.ac.uk/online-deg...aduate-degrees

    There's also a whole new breed of courses, pioneered in America, called Moocs: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...online-courses

    In the you can take a short course, delivered by academics from the likes of Harvard and Stanford. You, obviously, don't get a degree from these, but it does give you further knowledge, it is a qualification, and if you're unsure of what you want to go into, it may guide you.

    Well done on getting sorted and doing something worthwhile with it!
 
 
 
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