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    WHO has 4 rejection for medicine and has no hope for entery in 2013 in UK??? are you willing to get admission abroad???
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    (Original post by jaam14)
    WHO has 4 rejection for medicine and has no hope for entery in 2013 in UK??? are you willing to get admission abroad???
    Just take a gap year and re-apply. 60-70% of people are in the same situation as you and the majority of them get an offer or 2 during there gap year (such as me!) dont get depressed or spend thousands abroad. take a year out, live a little.
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    Stop panicking and just re-apply.
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    I also took a gap year this year after getting 4 rejections last year It's honestly not the end of the world. Get a job, build up some dosh for next year and re-apply. Like a lot of folk I have been successful this year!
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    (Original post by paradoxicalme)
    There seems a slightly worrying cycle for medicine; people apply for medicine in Year 13, they don't get in, they get understandably upset but then decide to go on a gap year and improve their application, they reapply and get in. But surely if lots of gap year people get into medicine, then lots of Y13 people will have to get rejected! A cycle's being perpetuated.

    We really need to find people another route into medicine other than the highly oversubscribed medicine course, or taking a degree in Pharmacy or Biomedical Sciences and then trying to get into the hugely oversubscribed grad med course.
    Why is it worrying? There's some talk of making medicine graduate entry only, which thankfully I don't think will ever happen but it makes the point that medical schools like candidates who have a bit of maturity and life experience. Making more people take a gap year means firstly filtering out all those who weren't that committed in the first place, and secondly means you have to spend some time in the real world either working or traveling or volunteering - you see and do and experience things that end up making you a more well rounded person and therefore a better doctor.

    Also, the reason it's oversubscribed is because we need to produce a fixed number of doctors. You need to control demand for the course, not the supply of places, so somehow you need to reduce the number of applicants.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Why is it worrying? There's some talk of making medicine graduate entry only, which thankfully I don't think will ever happen but it makes the point that medical schools like candidates who have a bit of maturity and life experience. Making more people take a gap year means firstly filtering out all those who weren't that committed in the first place, and secondly means you have to spend some time in the real world either working or traveling or volunteering - you see and do and experience things that end up making you a more well rounded person and therefore a better doctor.

    Also, the reason it's oversubscribed is because we need to produce a fixed number of doctors. You need to control demand for the course, not the supply of places, so somehow you need to reduce the number of applicants.
    I totally agree. Having taken a year out has been a blessing in disguise for me. I do feel more mature and having ploughed myself into difficult situations dealing with all types of people I totally realise that medicine is so much people orientated as well as science orientated. I know that sounds obvious but if you try and get a job or jobs where you are continually pressured by people who from the outside looking in seem to be being unreasonable you will know whether medicine is for you. The job doesn't have to be medicine related. Just try it 5 days a week for 40 hours. My friend worked in a call centre before starting medicine and at his interview a consultant told him that it was the best training in the world!
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    (Original post by jaam14)
    WHO has 4 rejection for medicine and has no hope for entery in 2013 in UK??? are you willing to get admission abroad???
    I only got one interview last year. I improved my application, took a gap year, re-applied(smartly this time), had two interviews and two offers.

    When life knocks you down, land on your back, because if you can look up, you can gt up!
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    (Original post by jaam14)
    WHO has 4 rejection for medicine and has no hope for entery in 2013 in UK??? are you willing to get admission abroad???
    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Why is it worrying? There's some talk of making medicine graduate entry only, which thankfully I don't think will ever happen but it makes the point that medical schools like candidates who have a bit of maturity and life experience. Making more people take a gap year means firstly filtering out all those who weren't that committed in the first place, and secondly means you have to spend some time in the real world either working or traveling or volunteering - you see and do and experience things that end up making you a more well rounded person and therefore a better doctor.

    Also, the reason it's oversubscribed is because we need to produce a fixed number of doctors. You need to control demand for the course, not the supply of places, so somehow you need to reduce the number of applicants.
    There are definitely far to many poor applicants who get 4 rejections, waste a year without changing much, and then somehow get in.

    I know people who just sat at home for their gap year, and then got a Medicine offer, for example.
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    Are you an international student? Because you spelt entry wrong.
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    (Original post by Atemukay)
    Are you an international student? Because you spelt entry wrong.
    bloody hell who cares????? look at your keyboard 'E' is right next to 'R', its easy to make that mistake
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    There are definitely far to many poor applicants who get 4 rejections, waste a year without changing much, and then somehow get in.

    I know people who just sat at home for their gap year, and then got a Medicine offer, for example.
    I guess how they choose to spend their gap year is up to them. Some day they may look back and regret that, but they were determined enough to try again for Medicine by re-applying rather than settling for something else and they would have met the minimum standard in order to get the offer anyway.
    The truth is, having the grades and acing a 10-15 minute is what it takes and many people do get in by fluke, but its just part of the system. I know some people with no work experience and volunteering who got in and there are some people who just had a bad day during their interview and have been working so hard for it.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    There are definitely far to many poor applicants who get 4 rejections, waste a year without changing much, and then somehow get in.

    I know people who just sat at home for their gap year, and then got a Medicine offer, for example.
    A poor application does not equal a poor applicant.

    And what would you have them do, introduce activity requirements for gappers? While it is strongly advised to have a solid plan for your gap year so that admissions tutors see that you're exploiting your extra time to the max, so you have that to talk about at interview, and so you don't get horribly bored and depressed, it's not a requirement. Those people who just sat at home and got an offer still met all the same requirements as the people applying in Year 13.

    People can reapply as many times as they want. They're going to have to meet the same standards to get in, it's not a case of simply getting another go on the tombola (and even if it was to an extent, it wouldn't mean those getting the 'winning tickets' in Year 13 'deserve' them any more than the gappers).

    The sense of entitlement here is ridiculous. To wish the competition was reduced so you have a better chance of getting in is perfectly understandable, but to think that you actually should have that happen for you, at the expense of a load of other people's chances at the career they want, is incredible.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    The sense of entitlement here is ridiculous. To wish the competition was reduced so you have a better chance of getting in is perfectly understandable, but to think that you actually should have that happen for you, at the expense of a load of other people's chances at the career they want, is incredible.
    Are you talking about *my* sense of entitlement? Because I don't care about medicine. I probably would have got in if I'd wanted to, anyway. It's not the most difficult thing in the world.

    No, I'm talking about medical applicants, and how there are too many of them expecting places, which inevitably leads to rejection and people heading into biomedical degrees at universities well below their potential, or wasting another year only for a similar result to likely occur.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    Are you talking about *my* sense of entitlement? Because I don't care about medicine. I probably would have got in if I'd wanted to, anyway. It's not the most difficult thing in the world.

    No, I'm talking about medical applicants, and how there are too many of them expecting places, which inevitably leads to rejection and people heading into biomedical degrees at universities well below their potential, or wasting another year only for a similar result to likely occur.
    If you don't want to do medicine that's fine, but don't criticise others' ambitions. Re-applicants often actually have a better experience because they have results in hand, have more experience and maturity, and get more informed as a result of their 4 rejections. If you want to be informed of how it works then all the information is in the public domain, ergo TSR, so its not as if people are being denied information of how the process works.
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    orryyt oryttt ,calm down now! i got 4 rejections and 1 offer to apply for med school at St Georges Uni, its situated in the CARIBBEAN,yes CARIBBEAN.and its absuloutly beautful,you guys need to check the campus pictures out.its unreal,i wasnt even totally serious about it ,just did it to fill out my last choice and then BAM i get an offer;/ really dont want to move continents :/ seems a tad daunting.
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    (Original post by AspiringGenius)
    If you don't want to do medicine that's fine, but don't criticise others' ambitions. Re-applicants often actually have a better experience because they have results in hand, have more experience and maturity, and get more informed as a result of their 4 rejections. If you want to be informed of how it works then all the information is in the public domain, ergo TSR, so its not as if people are being denied information of how the process works.
    I know how it works, but too many people are aiming beyond what they can achieve. I would have an issue with people with Ds at GCSE applying to Oxbridge, Imp, LSE, UCL, Bristol for example. I wouldn't stop them, but I'd want to educate them on how silly their decision would be.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    There are definitely far to many poor applicants who get 4 rejections, waste a year without changing much, and then somehow get in.

    I know people who just sat at home for their gap year, and then got a Medicine offer, for example.
    You have no idea what they changed. Maybe they sat at home reading up on the application process and making a much more tactical application, having spent time revising for the UKCAT or BMAT and researching which schools they had a much better chance at, hence the magical improvement in their application success the second time round.

    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    Are you talking about *my* sense of entitlement? Because I don't care about medicine. I probably would have got in if I'd wanted to, anyway. It's not the most difficult thing in the world.

    No, I'm talking about medical applicants, and how there are too many of them expecting places, which inevitably leads to rejection and people heading into biomedical degrees at universities well below their potential, or wasting another year only for a similar result to likely occur.
    This is utter *******s. The majority of applicants don't get in.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    Are you talking about *my* sense of entitlement? Because I don't care about medicine. I probably would have got in if I'd wanted to, anyway. It's not the most difficult thing in the world.

    No, I'm talking about medical applicants, and how there are too many of them expecting places, which inevitably leads to rejection and people heading into biomedical degrees at universities well below their potential, or wasting another year only for a similar result to likely occur.
    Not at interview, as they'd realise what a horrible person you are. over the past few days out of all your posts on tsr I haven't seen a single intelligent helpful comment whatsoever. medicine isn't about being clever.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    You have no idea what they changed. Maybe they sat at home reading up on the application process and making a much more tactical application, having spent time revising for the UKCAT or BMAT and researching which schools they had a much better chance at, hence the magical improvement in their application success the second time round.


    This is utter *******s. The majority of applicants don't get in.
    I do know what they changed.. they were my friends.

    (Original post by Palindromic)
    Not at interview, as they'd realise what a horrible person you are. over the past few days out of all your posts on tsr I haven't seen a single intelligent helpful comment whatsoever. medicine isn't about being clever.
    If you've been reading my comments, you'll have noticed that I passed significantly more difficult interviews, and was accepted into world top 5 institutions at all three levels: ugrad, masters, and postgrad. All of these required me to pass extensive interviews which lasted way longer than the standard 15-20 minute medicine interview..

    And then you have my job interviews which resulted in plenty of offers.

    If my interviewers thought I was horrible, they wouldn't have given me places/job offers.

    All of the evidence points towards me being able to pass the most difficult of interviews at both university- and job-level. Along with that, I easily had good enough grades, easily had enough activities, and all that was left was experience/interest in the medical field, which would have come if I'd wanted to do medicine.

    Medics think that their course is one of the most difficult to get into, and this is true. To get into medicine at any old uni is harder than getting into Economics at any old uni. But getting into Medicine at any old uni is easier than getting into Economics at Cambridge, and getting into Medicine at Cambridge is comparable too.

    The standardisation just means that Medicine only becomes so easy to get into. There are still more difficult and prestigious university places to be awarded :rolleyes:

    Also, if evidence is what you want, then I know people who got into Medicine - loads of them - who wouldn't have stood a chance in hell at Oxbridge applications for any subject.

    I remain convinced that I would have gone into medicine if I'd wanted to.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    If you've been reading my comments, you'll have noticed that I passed significantly more difficult interviews, and was accepted into world top 5 institutions at all three levels: ugrad, masters, and postgrad. All of these required me to pass extensive interviews which lasted way longer than the standard 15-20 minute medicine interview..

    And then you have my job interviews which resulted in plenty of offers.

    All of the evidence points towards me being able to pass the most difficult of interviews at both university- and job-level. Along with that, I easily had good enough grades, easily had enough activities, and all that was left was experience/interest in the medical field, which would have come if I'd wanted to do medicine.
    you cant hide the sort of person you are, the interviewers have dealt with hundreds of applicants like you and will be able to single you out, no matter how good you think you are. you have no interest in a medical field (which you can't suddenly conjure up) which would show in an interview/ps. Not much point arguing over hypothetical applications.
 
 
 
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