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    (Original post by Palindromic)
    you cant hide the sort of person you are, the interviewers have dealt with hundreds of applicants like you and will be able to single you out, no matter how good you think you are. you have no interest in a medical field (which you can't suddenly conjure up) which would show in an interview/ps. Not much point arguing over hypothetical applications.
    I definitely could pretend to be interested in medicine, it's not hard.. especially as the interviews only last 20 minutes. In fact, I distinctly recall receiving an offer for a subject in which I had very little interest whatsoever - I'd applied for it as I had the grades and was good at it, and knew that I had other offers in the bag anyway. I didn't end up doing it in the end, but it just shows how easy it is to pretend at interview to like something.

    Once again, I know people who got into Medicine who had very little interest in it, and whose interview skills were poor compared to my own, along with their ECs and grades. I would have destroyed them in the UKCAT too, I am certain.

    And whatever you think I'm like, the most prestigious employers and universities in the world wanted me, but didn't want the hundreds of others applying.

    At the end of the day, someone with an impressive UKCAT score, the very best grades at AS and A-level, tonnes of ECs, a great personal statement (which I could easily have done given that I wrote most of my medic friend's PS, and he got an offer too..) and brilliant interview skills.. is very likely to get an offer.

    You're just sour that, at the end of the day, regardless of what you think of me, more important people loved me.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    I definitely could pretend to be interested in medicine, it's not hard.. especially as the interviews only last 20 minutes. In fact, I distinctly recall receiving an offer for a subject in which I had very little interest whatsoever - I'd applied for it as I had the grades and was good at it. I didn't end up doing it in the end, but it just shows how easy it is to pretend at interview to like something.

    Once again, I know people who got into Medicine who had very little interest in it, and whose interview skills were poor compared to my own, along with their ECs and grades. I would have destroyed them in the UKCAT too, I am certain.

    And whatever you think I'm like, the most prestigious employers and universities in the world wanted me, but didn't want the hundreds of others applying.

    At the end of the day, someone with an impressive UKCAT score, the very best grades at AS and A-level, tonnes of ECs, a great personal statement (which I could easily have done given that I wrote most of my medic friend's PS, and he got an offer too..) and brilliant interview skills.. is very likely to get an offer.

    You're just sour that, at the end of the day, regardless of what you think of me, more important people loved me.
    fair enough on what you said, the application process is flawed, and any method which allows you a good chance of getting is equally flawed. tried ukcat before? not saying its difficult, just curious

    Why am i sour? i wanted to get into medicine and become a doctor, i got into medicine... i dont give a **** about you
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    (Original post by Palindromic)
    fair enough on what you said, the application process is flawed, and any method which allows you a good chance of getting is equally flawed. tried ukcat before? not saying its difficult, just curious

    Why am i sour? i wanted to get into medicine and become a doctor, i got into medicine... i dont give a **** about you
    You just seemed very sour, but evidently not

    Glad that you agree with me. I have tried UKCAT (mocks) before, and got full marks in the Oxford TSA specimen and full marks in another test I had to do, so I'm confident that I would have done well.

    Basically, I have respect for medics, I know it's a hard course. But I don't have any respect for the medics who kid themselves into lording it over every other course/university there is, giving "medicine is standardised so it's impossibly difficult" as an answer. It's tough. It's very tough. But there are tougher things out there which I managed to do.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Why is it worrying? There's some talk of making medicine graduate entry only, which thankfully I don't think will ever happen but it makes the point that medical schools like candidates who have a bit of maturity and life experience. Making more people take a gap year means firstly filtering out all those who weren't that committed in the first place, and secondly means you have to spend some time in the real world either working or traveling or volunteering - you see and do and experience things that end up making you a more well rounded person and therefore a better doctor.

    Also, the reason it's oversubscribed is because we need to produce a fixed number of doctors. You need to control demand for the course, not the supply of places, so somehow you need to reduce the number of applicants.
    That's one way of looking at it. On the other hand, the fact that, say, 50% of all places at medical school go to reapplicants means there are 50% fewer places for first time applicants, of whom many will in turn reapply. As has been said, the cycle is self-perpetuating. Given that no distinction is made between first time and second time applicants, inevitably second time applicants have an advantage. The trend wherein every person that gets rejected reapplies the next year is very unfair for first time applicants, especially those who don't want to piss a year of their life down the drain. I know I would just give up and do something else were I rejected.

    What I'm trying to say is that the splurge of reapplicants every year is hugely unfair on first time applicants that invariably have weaker applications. Furthermore (the bit I take issue with), reapplying effectively turns medical school entry into a two year activity for many applicants. I'm sure this is an unpopular opinion, but frankly I think reapplying is rather selfish, in that it queers the pitch for next years applicants. Were it up to me, I would strongly discourage reapplying.
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    (Original post by Lansaaaa)
    That's one way of looking at it. On the other hand, the fact that, say, 50% of all places at medical school go to reapplicants means there are 50% fewer places for first time applicants, of whom many will in turn reapply. As has been said, the cycle is self-perpetuating. Given that no distinction is made between first time and second time applicants, inevitably second time applicants have an advantage. The trend wherein every person that gets rejected reapplies the next year is very unfair for first time applicants, especially those who don't want to piss a year of their life down the drain. I know I would just give up and do something else were I rejected.

    What I'm trying to say is that the splurge of reapplicants every year is hugely unfair on first time applicants that invariably have weaker applications. Furthermore (the bit I take issue with), reapplying effectively turns medical school entry into a two year activity for many applicants. I'm sure this is an unpopular opinion, but frankly I think reapplying is rather selfish, in that it queers the pitch for next years applicants. Were it up to me, I would strongly discourage reapplying.
    Hence my point about commitment. If you think a gap year is pissing a year of your life down the drain then you're looking at the wrong career path... It's worth looking at how it works later down the line. If you don't get a specialty job, you're expected to take a non-training post or do something relevant and productive with the year until you apply again. These people have already spent 7 or 8 or more years training. Going to 'do something else' is far less of an option. So frankly it's better that applicants get used to what rejection looks like - the vast majority of applicants have never failed an exam, never failed to succeed at anything they wanted to do. A reality check that the real world isn't like that is useful early on in the process rather than later.

    Anyway, where are you getting this 50% stat from? It's not something I've seen before.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Hence my point about commitment. If you think a gap year is pissing a year of your life down the drain then you're looking at the wrong career path... It's worth looking at how it works later down the line. If you don't get a specialty job, you're expected to take a non-training post or do something relevant and productive with the year until you apply again. These people have already spent 7 or 8 or more years training. Going to 'do something else' is far less of an option. So frankly it's better that applicants get used to what rejection looks like - the vast majority of applicants have never failed an exam, never failed to succeed at anything they wanted to do. A reality check that the real world isn't like that is useful early on in the process rather than later.

    Anyway, where are you getting this 50% stat from? It's not something I've seen before.
    I just plucked 50% out of the air to be honest, although as I recall one of the medical schools I applied to (they rejected me so maybe I'm just sour ) was at least 40% reapplicants. I'm not sure I agree with you regarding commitment to be honest. Like I said, had I been rejected from everywhere I wouldn't have reapplied, but I don't think that necessarily indicates any lack of commitment. My attitude is that if you're rejected, then you're rejected for a reason, and it's vastly more constructive to think of something else you enjoy and would like to do as a career than to dedicate another year of your life to applying once more, faced with the very real prospect of being rejected again. Granted, a lot of medicine applicants don't feel like they could ever do anything else, so maybe I'm not being fair. I was at least lucky enough to have 3 or 4 other things I would have been happy to study/work in. I don't think having the maturity to cut your losses and move on is the same as lacking commitment in the slightest.

    I don't know about you, but had I applied for a course, been rejected and then spent another year waiting to reapply, I would have felt a lot like I was wasting a year if all I really wanted to be doing was studying the course.

    Those are my idle thoughts anyway. I'm not in any way trying to influence anyone else's decision.
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    (Original post by Lansaaaa)
    That's one way of looking at it. On the other hand, the fact that, say, 50% of all places at medical school go to reapplicants means there are 50% fewer places for first time applicants, of whom many will in turn reapply. As has been said, the cycle is self-perpetuating. Given that no distinction is made between first time and second time applicants, inevitably second time applicants have an advantage. The trend wherein every person that gets rejected reapplies the next year is very unfair for first time applicants, especially those who don't want to piss a year of their life down the drain. I know I would just give up and do something else were I rejected.

    What I'm trying to say is that the splurge of reapplicants every year is hugely unfair on first time applicants that invariably have weaker applications. Furthermore (the bit I take issue with), reapplying effectively turns medical school entry into a two year activity for many applicants. I'm sure this is an unpopular opinion, but frankly I think reapplying is rather selfish, in that it queers the pitch for next years applicants. Were it up to me, I would strongly discourage reapplying.
    Though your argument is interesting, it's slightly flawed. You say that it's rather selfish for someone who receives 4 rejections first time round to apply again the next year, yet you say that if you personally received 4 rejections, you would just 'give up and do something else' - which suggests that if it wasn't such a tough application process, you would try again, and lower the chance of school leavers gettting a place. Where would it end? It's also not really about fairness, and everybody getting one shot at getting a career in medicine. It's about getting good doctors out of the pool of applicants. The capitalist society employs the most productive factors of production to maximise profit. At the same time, people just want doctors who can do a good job, society's not interested in giving each applicant an equal opportunity.

    At the end of the day, the process is pretty horrible. But are there any good alternatives? Perhaps this is just how it has to be, because it's massively over-subscribed.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    I know how it works, but too many people are aiming beyond what they can achieve. I would have an issue with people with Ds at GCSE applying to Oxbridge, Imp, LSE, UCL, Bristol for example. I wouldn't stop them, but I'd want to educate them on how silly their decision would be.
    if you don't try, you'll never know if you were good enough. I took a risk with one of my options (Bristol) I really liked it and applied and didn't want to say to myself, if only I had tried and applied. Fair enough I got rejected but I have no regrets whatsoever, as I have two offers from my second choice and back up course. Even though you'd all be right in saying I had 'wasted' an option and took a massive risk.

    I know a girl with ABCCC at AS who got an offer from Oxford (yes she has 10A* and an A at GCSE) and everyone was talking about how crazy she was, but is now working her butt of to get AAA.
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    (Original post by Palindromic)
    you cant hide the sort of person you are, the interviewers have dealt with hundreds of applicants like you and will be able to single you out, no matter how good you think you are. you have no interest in a medical field (which you can't suddenly conjure up) which would show in an interview/ps. Not much point arguing over hypothetical applications.

    Totally agree! A girl in my year is very bright, 11A* at GCSE, 4 A* at A-level(predictions) UKCAT of 750+ got four interview and 3 rejections already. Although, she is what they call 'all rounded' as she competes in sport internationally and plays two instruments to a high level, she has no passion for Medicine (not that we [other applicants]can see anyway) and we get the impression with both her parents being doctors and she says 'ive always known its for me' that perhaps she feels she 'has' to take that route.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    You just seemed very sour, but evidently not

    Glad that you agree with me. I have tried UKCAT (mocks) before, and got full marks in the Oxford TSA specimen and full marks in another test I had to do, so I'm confident that I would have done well.

    Basically, I have respect for medics, I know it's a hard course. But I don't have any respect for the medics who kid themselves into lording it over every other course/university there is, giving "medicine is standardised so it's impossibly difficult" as an answer. It's tough. It's very tough. But there are tougher things out there which I managed to do.
    Getting accepted to a medical school is one thing, becoming a competent and compassionate doctor is another thing.
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    i applied one uni for medicine sent my pharmacy personal statement -.-
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    You just seemed very sour, but evidently not

    Glad that you agree with me. I have tried UKCAT (mocks) before, and got full marks in the Oxford TSA specimen and full marks in another test I had to do, so I'm confident that I would have done well.

    Basically, I have respect for medics, I know it's a hard course. But I don't have any respect for the medics who kid themselves into lording it over every other course/university there is, giving "medicine is standardised so it's impossibly difficult" as an answer. It's tough. It's very tough. But there are tougher things out there which I managed to do.
    No one is "lording" it over every other course.

    We all know medicine is hard to get into, but so is law, economics and (for someone who can't cut in a straight line) hairdressing. No one here is saying medicine is THE single most hardest programme to get into out there. Nothing in life is easy but if an applicant fails to get in the first time around, I applaud him for giving it another go. It takes great courage to look at failure in the eye, choose to get up again instead of lying on the bathroom floor or walking away. The same thing goes for say, someone who fails to get into a course in accounting due to bad grades or a bad interview but decides to reapply.

    You on the other hand, is a conceited idiot with your "there are tougher things out there which I managed to do" attitude. Like I said before, for someone who can't cut in a very straight line, I'd be hard pressed to force any hairdressing school out there to accept me. How "tough" something is depends on the individual.

    Also, I smell troll.
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    My friend took a few years out working, part of the time was spent as a nursing assistant in A&E, he reapplied and he's now coming up to the end of his second year. Just reapply.
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    I've received 4 rejections now
    Im kinda down a bit atm, for one of my choices i really thought i had done enough to get in and was kinda shocked with my interview scores.
    I've never been 100% commited to medicine, but when my friend asked me "what else would you apply for" i really couldnt come up with anything.
    Medicine is something im interested in, but im not one of those candidates who have always wanted to do it since they were a kid.
    I have the option of ucas extra (apply something economics related- something im interested in) or take a gap year and re-apply for medicine.
    I really didnt want to take a gap year, cause i feel a gay year would be very lonely (most friends going off to uni) and the time off might mean i lose my motivation to effectively study and my routine of having exams constantly would be broken.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. (kinda sad atm)
    Thanks
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    (Original post by manutillidie)
    I've received 4 rejections now
    Im kinda down a bit atm, for one of my choices i really thought i had done enough to get in and was kinda shocked with my interview scores.
    I've never been 100% commited to medicine, but when my friend asked me "what else would you apply for" i really couldnt come up with anything.
    Medicine is something im interested in, but im not one of those candidates who have always wanted to do it since they were a kid.
    I have the option of ucas extra (apply something economics related- something im interested in) or take a gap year and re-apply for medicine.
    I really didnt want to take a gap year, cause i feel a gay year would be very lonely (most friends going off to uni) and the time off might mean i lose my motivation to effectively study and my routine of having exams constantly would be broken.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. (kinda sad atm)
    Thanks
    It doesn't matter in the slightest whether you've wanted to be a doctor since you were a kid. A kid has no clue what being a doctor actually involves. Those people who have wanted it longest have no more right to it than you do.

    If you plan stuff to do on your gap year it won't be as lonely as you think. Besides, you'll be making new friends when you do get to uni, you won't be hanging around with your friends from school/college anymore anyway. And getting a job/travelling/volunteering/whatever on your gap year will give you lots of chances to meet new people and practise for when you get to uni.

    The whole gap year-losing motivation to study thing is really just a bit of a myth perpetuated by parents who worry about what their kids will busy themselves with on a gap year. You won't lose the will to go to uni. And university is not at all like A-level study. If anything it might be good to have a clean break from your A-level study methods so you have a better chance of really seeing what works when you get to uni, as opposed to clinging to old methods and being reluctant to let go of them and try new things when they don't work so well.

    Give yourself some time to come round and get over the rejections and then see which plan makes you feel happier (it doesn't matter whether that plan is scarier to you or not), going for a different course now or taking a gap year and trying again.
 
 
 
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