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    Hi guys,

    Let me give you a bit of history to start off with;

    I am 18 years old and in the year 2000 I was diagnosed with multiple learning/behavioral difficulties, namely ADHD and Asphergers (I think that's the list, Its all I could find going through my past paperwork).

    In 2004 due to my behavior I went from a Mainstream Primary School to a Special Needs School who at the time better suited my needs. This school had much slower, more specific learning practices - none of which really included any handwriting skills (There were only around 6 of us in a class and 50 in the whole school to give you a perspective).

    In 2006/7 I managed to get back into mainstream but in secondary school. From this point till Year 11 (Ended 2011) I was statemented through the school for my special needs and for the fact my handwriting was and still is dreadful (I'm not sure whether i'm statemented through my college). My Disability Living Allowance stopped at 16 I believe because my behavior had improved dramatically, however my handwriting still hadn't which is why I was statemented throughout my whole GCSEs.

    When it came to doing my GCSE's I was given extra time and a word processor to do my work on to help me get through them (I have never done an exam under 'normal' time constraints). When writing normally I typically have two ways of writing; Writing extremely slowly, one letter at a time for my writing to be readable or writing at a normal pace and probably ending up giving the marker a very hard time reading the text.

    Now, to the present;

    Due to my interest in IT I chose to study a BTEC in College which I will be finishing this year. Due to the fact it is entirely coursework based I haven't had a problem because it is all done on the computer which I have no problems with.

    In December 2011 I was given an SpLD assessment at college to test where my handwriting was at and I was given the verdict that I am entitled to use a word processor in exams, however I do not need spell check or extra time (Probably due to the fact I can type fast).


    Now, I have been given a conditional offer to join a University (Portsmouth) in September of this year and as a result I have contacted their ASDAC centre to ask whether the University will be able to continue my support with a word processor. I have been given the following response:

    "Unfortunately, poor handwriting is not a disability unless it is evidenced by means of a specific learning difficulty or some evidence to show a physical disability. We have many students who have poor handwriting but they would never be offered any adjustment for assessment.
    In order for this University to consider any adjustment you would have to have evidence of a Specific Learning Difficulty eg. Dyspraxia and the report would need to be post 16 years for Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA) purposes. The report would have to be written by an appropriately qualified individual eg. a specialist teacher with a diagnostic qualification, an Educational Psychologist and both would require practicising practitioners certificate in order to provide support through the DSA. The DSA is the key to the support you may require at University and it would be wrong to just focus on adjustment for examinations. Evidence of ADHD and ASD can be provided by a GP letter for the DSA and we would encourage you to make an application for this support now you have made a choice of University. We are more than happy to assist you through the process and review the recommended support. We have an Assessment Centre at this University (Portsmouth Assessment Centre) where once you have provided the evidence and Student Finance England have approved a referral for an assessment of your academic support needs, you can be offered an appointment. ".

    Does anyone know where I should go from here? I haven't had an annual review since before I was 16 and I don't believe I have ADHD at a level which is strong enough anymore however due to my past diagnosis my handwriting is as it is now.

    I guess I am kind of trapped in a corner of what to do. I found it hard to understand what that response is actually asking for, but by the looks of it I need to be assessed by a qualified person? And that they are trying to get me to apply for DSA instead of adjusting just exams for me? I'm just not sure what to do because my poor handwriting is a result of past disabilities which I am no longer receiving DLA for, and I haven't needed a word processor since my GCSEs in 2011 because all my work is based on computers which I use for my course anyway.
    I contacted the SpLD department who assessed me back in 2011 and was given a sheet for assessors for Dyslexia (Which I don't believe I have or have had - I've never heard it mentioned before in my 100's of pages of past reviews) but it also said "Assessment for dyspraxia, ADHD, ADD and ASD needs may be available via the NHS through your GP".

    Is that assessment the route I need to go down? (By the way the GP I have now has never dealt with my disabilities before because we moved after I was taken off of my concerta medication, so I wouldn't know where to start or whether he has the records from my old GP).

    This is the only other place I felt comfortable asking my questions because I'm sure I'll be able to be led in the right direction.

    Can anyone help me please, and suggest what route to go down?

    Thanks for your help!
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    (Original post by Chrisszzyy)
    I guess I am kind of trapped in a corner of what to do. I found it hard to understand what that response is actually asking for, but by the looks of it I need to be assessed by a qualified person?
    You need to be assessed by a Psychologist, an Educational Psychologist/someone with expertise in learning difficulties and ADHD specifically.

    And that they are trying to get me to apply for DSA instead of adjusting just exams for me?
    Not at all. DSA and university adjustments are two very different things. You can get DSA support, but this does not mean the university will automatically make adjustments on their part.

    What they are saying is that people with a specific learning disability can receive appropriate adjustments and support. If you have a specific learning disability, and have not been assessed since the age of 16, you need a new assessment. If this new assessment confirms the diagnosis of ADHD (or any other learning difficulty) then you can receive appropriate support from the university.

    They won't say, "yes go and apply for DSA but we won't offer you support" as this could be illegal. Besides, you still need an updated assessment to apply for DSA anyway.

    Can anyone help me please, and suggest what route to go down?!
    As for your new GP having your old notes, yes he/she will. Medical records are transferred between GP surgeries when you move. Otherwise your new GP will be missing large chunks of important information about previous and current medical conditions, operations, allergies, medication...

    However, I'm not sure if your GP will be helpful if you did receive a diagnosis as a child. I am not an expert, but I believe a GP will only refer you to a specialist for an assessment if you were not diagnosed as a child. You may be referred to a psychiatrist or other mental health professional if you have mental health problems which may, or may not, be linked to the ADHD. However, I don't think you can get a new psychological assessment on the NHS.

    You will most likely have to find a psychologist yourself and get an assessment done privately. There will be a charge for this which is usually between 150 and 350 pounds, I'm afraid.

    A list of psychologists can be found on the BPS website

    http://www.bps.org.uk/bpslegacy/dcp
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    (Original post by River85)
    You need to be assessed by a Psychologist, an Educational Psychologist/someone with expertise in learning difficulties and ADHD specifically.



    Not at all. DSA and university adjustments are two very different things. You can get DSA support, but this does not mean the university will automatically make adjustments on their part.

    What they are saying is that people with a specific learning disability can receive appropriate adjustments and support. If you have a specific learning disability, and have not been assessed since the age of 16, you need a new assessment. If this new assessment confirms the diagnosis of ADHD (or any other learning difficulty) then you can receive appropriate support from the university.

    They won't say, "yes go and apply for DSA but we won't offer you support" as this could be illegal. Besides, you still need an updated assessment to apply for DSA anyway.



    As for your new GP having your old notes, yes he/she will. Medical records are transferred between GP surgeries when you move. Otherwise your new GP will be missing large chunks of important information about previous and current medical conditions, operations, allergies, medication...

    However, I'm not sure if your GP will be helpful if you did receive a diagnosis as a child. I am not an expert, but I believe a GP will only refer you to a specialist for an assessment if you were not diagnosed as a child. You may be referred to a psychiatrist or other mental health professional if you have mental health problems which may, or may not, be linked to the ADHD. However, I don't think you can get a new psychological assessment on the NHS.

    You will most likely have to find a psychologist yourself and get an assessment done privately. There will be a charge for this which is usually between 150 and 350 pounds, I'm afraid.

    A list of psychologists can be found on the BPS website

    http://www.bps.org.uk/bpslegacy/dcp
    Thanks for your reply River85, it has definitely cleared a few things up.

    I am however still confused with what to do because as I have said, I don't have ADHD as bad anymore (In-fact my parents sometimes doubt I still have it because according to them, I've changed completely) so I doubt an assessment would confirm I still have it.
    My handwriting is still poor as a result of the transitioning between mainstream to special school and then back to mainstream (As well as the lack of attention I paid before the transition, according to my paperwork).

    Reading between the lines, am I correct in saying that I have to have a current (Post 16 assessed) learning disability to be eligible for any support (Whether it be a simple word processor in exams) in future education, despite my handwriting being a result of my previous disabilities?

    Edit: Also I've just been told something which has interested me and got me thinking; if I require an up to date assessment why would my previous diagnosis as a child disadvantage me in regards to whether I would get one with asking for one through the NHS? Surely if the previous diagnosis I received as a child is no longer valid and I require a new assessment to see what learning difficulties I have now then there shouldn't be any problem applying for one through my GP? Otherwise doesn't that mean the diagnosis I received as a child is still valid and can be used?

    What changes at 16 to require a new assessment?

    Thanks again for your help!
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    (Original post by Chrisszzyy)

    Reading between the lines, am I correct in saying that I have to have a current (Post 16 assessed) learning disability to be eligible for any support (Whether it be a simple word processor in exams) in future education, despite my handwriting being a result of my previous disabilities?
    Yes a post-16 assessment would be required. I'd imagine if your disability isn't a learning disability (physical or mental) you'd require something fairly recent too.
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    (Original post by Chrisszzyy)
    Reading between the lines, am I correct in saying that I have to have a current (Post 16 assessed) learning disability to be eligible for any support (Whether it be a simple word processor in exams) in future education, despite my handwriting being a result of my previous disabilities?
    I believe that you still require a post-16 assessment, even if you think you have got "better". It is only by having a recent assessment that a professional can accurately determine if you have got "better" and what your exact needs are (if any).

    As for your handwriting, do you really believe this is a result from the ADHD? Is your handwriting still legible? Do you have a reduced writing speed?

    Also you might be able to get full or partial funding for your re-assessment by writing to disability charities and trusts. If you get a private assessment as an undergraduate then you may be able to get the cost re-imbursed through Access to Learning. However, this is not guaranteed.

    Edit: Also I've just been told something which has interested me and got me thinking; if I require an up to date assessment why would my previous diagnosis as a child disadvantage me in regards to whether I would get one with asking for one through the NHS? Surely if the previous diagnosis I received as a child is no longer valid and I require a new assessment to see what learning difficulties I have now then there shouldn't be any problem applying for one through my GP? Otherwise doesn't that mean the diagnosis I received as a child is still valid and can be used?
    I cannot say that I am an expert, but this may be related to funding (for adults, compared to children). I know how difficult it can be for adults to get assessed for ADHD, or other things such as Asperger's, when they haven't been assessed as a child. Let alone those who already have been assessed and received a diagnosis.

    However, if you want to try and get an assessment through the NHS then by all means try. This sort of thing may differ by area.
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    (Original post by River85)
    I believe that you still require a post-16 assessment, even if you think you have got "better". It is only by having a recent assessment that a professional can accurately determine if you have got "better" and what your exact needs are (if any).

    As for your handwriting, do you really believe this is a result from the ADHD? Is your handwriting still legible? Do you have a reduced writing speed?
    Thanks for your reply. I see what you mean. I believe (As well as my parents) that ADHD played a part in my handwriting being illegible due to me finding it difficult to pay attention in Primary school when I was at my worst. Also the time I spent in the Special School played a big part as-well due to me missing out on the mainstream learning rate (They taught much more basic things in special school in comparison to mainstream I gather).

    Just thought I'd mention I have the list of disabilities from 2004 which were listed so any of these could have played a part: "ADHD plus symptoms of Asbergers" (Yes, spelt with a b for some reason in the list) "Tics and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder".

    I wrote a small page of "Things I find hard to do" tonight which I thought might come in useful if I see my GP about things, because I do have the tendency to forget things when put on the spot.

    I guess you can decide for yourself whether its legible :

    Page 1:

    Name:  tifhtd.jpg
Views: 785
Size:  79.7 KB

    Page 2:

    Name:  tifhtd 2.jpg
Views: 449
Size:  71.4 KB

    That is at my normal casual speed which isn't fast. It took me about 15 minutes to compile that list.

    One question (Yes another) which I have been thinking about: When looking for a qualified assessor for an assessment do they assess you on only the disabilities which people have had in the past or do they assess you on every disability?

    I think I'll try the NHS route first because I feel comfortable taking things through my GP in the first instance. I'll look towards getting it done privately if it comes down to it.

    I picked up on something from that email I quoted in the first post as-well which has again confused me: "Evidence of ADHD and ASD can be provided by a GP letter for the DSA".

    What could have they meant by this? Evidence of a diagnosis which was taken when I was a child though my GP? Very weird especially when they mentioned the post 16 assessment.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Chrisszzyy)
    I picked up on something from that email I quoted in the first post as-well which has again confused me: "Evidence of ADHD and ASD can be provided by a GP letter for the DSA".

    What could have they meant by this? Evidence of a diagnosis which was taken when I was a child though my GP? Very weird especially when they mentioned the post 16 assessment.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!
    Some areas don't fund adults for ASD assessment. (mine doesn't) So unless you go private, you'd just need a letter from your GP stating that you have ASD and how this impacts on your ability to study.
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    (Original post by Chrisszzyy)
    Hi guys,

    Let me give you a bit of history to start off with;

    I am 18 years old and in the year 2000 I was diagnosed with multiple learning/behavioral difficulties, namely ADHD and Asphergers (I think that's the list, Its all I could find going through my past paperwork).

    In 2004 due to my behavior I went from a Mainstream Primary School to a Special Needs School who at the time better suited my needs. This school had much slower, more specific learning practices - none of which really included any handwriting skills (There were only around 6 of us in a class and 50 in the whole school to give you a perspective).

    In 2006/7 I managed to get back into mainstream but in secondary school. From this point till Year 11 (Ended 2011) I was statemented through the school for my special needs and for the fact my handwriting was and still is dreadful (I'm not sure whether i'm statemented through my college). My Disability Living Allowance stopped at 16 I believe because my behavior had improved dramatically, however my handwriting still hadn't which is why I was statemented throughout my whole GCSEs.

    When it came to doing my GCSE's I was given extra time and a word processor to do my work on to help me get through them (I have never done an exam under 'normal' time constraints). When writing normally I typically have two ways of writing; Writing extremely slowly, one letter at a time for my writing to be readable or writing at a normal pace and probably ending up giving the marker a very hard time reading the text.

    Now, to the present;

    Due to my interest in IT I chose to study a BTEC in College which I will be finishing this year. Due to the fact it is entirely coursework based I haven't had a problem because it is all done on the computer which I have no problems with.

    In December 2011 I was given an SpLD assessment at college to test where my handwriting was at and I was given the verdict that I am entitled to use a word processor in exams, however I do not need spell check or extra time (Probably due to the fact I can type fast).


    Now, I have been given a conditional offer to join a University (Portsmouth) in September of this year and as a result I have contacted their ASDAC centre to ask whether the University will be able to continue my support with a word processor. I have been given the following response:

    "Unfortunately, poor handwriting is not a disability unless it is evidenced by means of a specific learning difficulty or some evidence to show a physical disability. We have many students who have poor handwriting but they would never be offered any adjustment for assessment.
    In order for this University to consider any adjustment you would have to have evidence of a Specific Learning Difficulty eg. Dyspraxia and the report would need to be post 16 years for Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA) purposes. The report would have to be written by an appropriately qualified individual eg. a specialist teacher with a diagnostic qualification, an Educational Psychologist and both would require practicising practitioners certificate in order to provide support through the DSA. The DSA is the key to the support you may require at University and it would be wrong to just focus on adjustment for examinations. Evidence of ADHD and ASD can be provided by a GP letter for the DSA and we would encourage you to make an application for this support now you have made a choice of University. We are more than happy to assist you through the process and review the recommended support. We have an Assessment Centre at this University (Portsmouth Assessment Centre) where once you have provided the evidence and Student Finance England have approved a referral for an assessment of your academic support needs, you can be offered an appointment. ".

    Does anyone know where I should go from here? I haven't had an annual review since before I was 16 and I don't believe I have ADHD at a level which is strong enough anymore however due to my past diagnosis my handwriting is as it is now.

    I guess I am kind of trapped in a corner of what to do. I found it hard to understand what that response is actually asking for, but by the looks of it I need to be assessed by a qualified person? And that they are trying to get me to apply for DSA instead of adjusting just exams for me? I'm just not sure what to do because my poor handwriting is a result of past disabilities which I am no longer receiving DLA for, and I haven't needed a word processor since my GCSEs in 2011 because all my work is based on computers which I use for my course anyway.
    I contacted the SpLD department who assessed me back in 2011 and was given a sheet for assessors for Dyslexia (Which I don't believe I have or have had - I've never heard it mentioned before in my 100's of pages of past reviews) but it also said "Assessment for dyspraxia, ADHD, ADD and ASD needs may be available via the NHS through your GP".

    Is that assessment the route I need to go down? (By the way the GP I have now has never dealt with my disabilities before because we moved after I was taken off of my concerta medication, so I wouldn't know where to start or whether he has the records from my old GP).

    This is the only other place I felt comfortable asking my questions because I'm sure I'll be able to be led in the right direction.

    Can anyone help me please, and suggest what route to go down?

    Thanks for your help!
    Hey Chrisszzyy

    Just to help you out with this I suffer from dyslexia and ADHD (which at my first university was undiagnosed and at my current is diagnosed).

    When I went to the university of Edinburgh and as part of my reasonable adjustment (adjustments that the university can accommodate); the university when sitting exams gave me my own room to sit my exams in as well as a scribe to write out the answers for me. This because I suffered from dyslexia and my handwriting was so bad that I could not write at a accepted pace or have readable writing.

    Also the university paid for for a SpLD test for diagnosis of SpLD, which in my case was for dyslexia as my diagnosis was too old. As for your ASD the university can also pay for a private consultant through there Access to Learning fund from the government which disabled people are put on top priority for (https://www.gov.uk/access-to-learning-fund/eligibility), which means you can get your new diagnosis with a clinical psychiatrist on a private bases.

    Also to note that DSA is not always a 1 time thing, if you have new evidence to say that you have additional needs you can reapply (which the university will help you with) and get more funding. Remember that DSA is just for funding, you have a right even without DSA for the university to make changes based on disabilities and they do not need evidence to start this process. They can even lend you equipment for when you first start.

    So in summary don't let the information overwhelm you! there is lots of support out there. Its a good idea to ring the disability department at the university and discuss it (this helps to get things set up for when you start) and also contact the DSA department of Student Finance England to discuss the DSA requirements.

    hope this helps =)
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    (Original post by mrbrit)
    Also the university paid for for a SpLD test for diagnosis of SpLD, which in my case was for dyslexia as my diagnosis was too old. As for your ASD the university can also pay for a private consultant through there Access to Learning fund from the government which disabled people are put on top priority for (https://www.gov.uk/access-to-learning-fund/eligibility), which means you can get your new diagnosis with a clinical psychiatrist on a private bases.
    I was told they (OU) won't pay for a private diagnosis of ASD. But they'll pay for a diagnosis of Dyslexia. It's because Dyslexia is a learning difficulty and ASD is a medical condition. (or something like that)

    They can even lend you equipment for when you first start.
    I had this. There was a backlog and I explained my situation to uni. I was a computing student at the time and the computing / technology department lent me a vioce recorder until mine came through.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    I was told they (OU) won't pay for a private diagnosis of ASD. But they'll pay for a diagnosis of Dyslexia. It's because Dyslexia is a learning difficulty and ASD is a medical condition. (or something like that)
    Yes that is true, I was having problems with accessing medical reports for my ADHD for the OU (as DSA are done direct through them and my specialist was on long term sickness and the GP records were too brief). Having harassing them for a bit someone told me that you can use the access to learning fund and the university has to accommodate otherwise they are being discriminatory. So in the end I had a private consultation to write a report paid by the access to learning fund =)
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    (Original post by mrbrit)
    Hey Chrisszzyy

    Just to help you out with this I suffer from dyslexia and ADHD (which at my first university was undiagnosed and at my current is diagnosed).

    When I went to the university of Edinburgh and as part of my reasonable adjustment (adjustments that the university can accommodate); the university when sitting exams gave me my own room to sit my exams in as well as a scribe to write out the answers for me. This because I suffered from dyslexia and my handwriting was so bad that I could not write at a accepted pace or have readable writing.

    Also the university paid for for a SpLD test for diagnosis of SpLD, which in my case was for dyslexia as my diagnosis was too old. As for your ASD the university can also pay for a private consultant through there Access to Learning fund from the government which disabled people are put on top priority for (https://www.gov.uk/access-to-learning-fund/eligibility), which means you can get your new diagnosis with a clinical psychiatrist on a private bases.

    Also to note that DSA is not always a 1 time thing, if you have new evidence to say that you have additional needs you can reapply (which the university will help you with) and get more funding. Remember that DSA is just for funding, you have a right even without DSA for the university to make changes based on disabilities and they do not need evidence to start this process. They can even lend you equipment for when you first start.

    So in summary don't let the information overwhelm you! there is lots of support out there. Its a good idea to ring the disability department at the university and discuss it (this helps to get things set up for when you start) and also contact the DSA department of Student Finance England to discuss the DSA requirements.

    hope this helps =)
    Hey mrbrit, Thanks for your reply. I see what you are saying, although I seem to get the impression that the University of Portsmouth is reluctant to just make adjustments for exams without me having a DSA. What I'm doing is going to my GP tomorrow to discuss it (Was booked last week) so I'll post back after. If he can't help me I might fund an assessment myself and take it from there.

    Thanks,
    Chris
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    (Original post by River85)
    As for your new GP having your old notes, yes he/she will. Medical records are transferred between GP surgeries when you move. Otherwise your new GP will be missing large chunks of important information about previous and current medical conditions, operations, allergies, medication...
    You are correct that he has my old notes and diagnosis (Which were; ADHD, Autism and Tics (Possibly tourettes)) - I was quite surprised at the last one mentioning tourettes! Apparently they didn't know exactly what to diagnose it as. Didn't see Aspergers listed on the screen though (I don't know whether this is linked to autism though because I've seen them listed together a lot).

    My doctor said he is going to write me a letter for the Portsmouth so I hope that solves this request.

    Thanks for all your help. I'll update this thread when a solid conclusion has been made (May be a while).
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    Aspergers is a form of Autism. People with Aspergers don't have a develop delay. Those of us with Autism do.
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    I'm not sure if this is relevant but not sure where to post sorry this is part of my problem = I am on DLA (highest for mobility) and have never lived alone and worried about applying for DSA incase I loose my DLA claim, now any new claims will become PiP claims.. I have a chronic spinal injury (curvature & surgery which stops me carrying weights and random pain spasms) and Parralysed Vocal cords which are incurable and cause me to wear a "trachy tube" which needs medical upkeep & carrying medical equipment always with me. :confused: It may not seem a lot but a combo of breathing uses (Vocal cords not working ^) and back pain can create blocks in carrying objects (books, laptops etc) and travel can not be far walked so will either need a nearby bus or taxi. My main question is "Can you claim DSA if you are still receiving DLA? based on that description, or would I loose my DLA?" sorry for the rant x
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    (Original post by Danie90)
    I'm not sure if this is relevant but not sure where to post sorry this is part of my problem = I am on DLA (highest for mobility) and have never lived alone and worried about applying for DSA incase I loose my DLA claim, now any new claims will become PiP claims.. I have a chronic spinal injury (curvature & surgery which stops me carrying weights and random pain spasms) and Parralysed Vocal cords which are incurable and cause me to wear a "trachy tube" which needs medical upkeep & carrying medical equipment always with me. :confused: It may not seem a lot but a combo of breathing uses (Vocal cords not working ^) and back pain can create blocks in carrying objects (books, laptops etc) and travel can not be far walked so will either need a nearby bus or taxi. My main question is "Can you claim DSA if you are still receiving DLA? based on that description, or would I loose my DLA?" sorry for the rant x
    Hey Danie90,

    No worries; I'll try to answer this the best I can as I used to be on DLA.

    As far as I know you won't loose your DLA claim if you apply for DSA. DSA is for students who have difficulties with studying as a result of a disability.
    Unlike DLA, DSA usually comes in the form of equipment and a small allowance for printing supplies.etc whereas DLA is financial help to live with a disability so they are more or less completely different from each other (They shouldn't clash). Therefore DSA shouldn't cancel DLA if you were to apply for it.

    Also as far as I can remember, DLA is done through a different system (and organisation) than DSA (Which is done through Student Finance England).

    Here is a post from another thread I found (Post 21):

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...7&postcount=21

    You shouldn't have anything to worry about . If you are still a bit unsure and you want to query it with SFE, their number is 0845 300 50 90 if you are able to ring them. Unfortunately I don't think they have an email address. I've always found their call center to be very helpful and they have always given me direct answers to questions .

    I hope this helps
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    Hi just came across this discussion. My son has ADHD Asperger and dyspraxia and like u his handwriting is awful ( like a spider has crawled across a page). He is going to uni in sep and has already been assessed by dsa. I didn't have post 16 evidence for dyspraxia but his consultant he was under did me a letter to confirm ADHD and AS. They are going to give him laptop, program that help to construct his work better dictaphone to record lessons. And a few extra lime help with costs and 1-1 for 1 hr pw. Al this was assessed on the grounds of ADHD and AS Hope this helps


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    (Original post by Leylo)
    Hi just came across this discussion. My son has ADHD Asperger and dyspraxia and like u his handwriting is awful ( like a spider has crawled across a page). He is going to uni in sep and has already been assessed by dsa. I didn't have post 16 evidence for dyspraxia but his consultant he was under did me a letter to confirm ADHD and AS. They are going to give him laptop, program that help to construct his work better dictaphone to record lessons. And a few extra lime help with costs and 1-1 for 1 hr pw. Al this was assessed on the grounds of ADHD and AS Hope this helps


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    Hi Leylo,

    Thanks for your reply.

    I've just realised I didn't update this thread with the results from my assessment.

    What happened was I was recommended a laptop, Dictaphone, printing allowances, software (I think for the Dictaphone) and training on that software. I haven't claimed it yet as I don't have my College Grades in writing (Certificates) but as soon as I get them I'll be claiming them.

    Any idea how long it takes for the equipment to be delivered?

    The doctors note which my doctor wrote out for me was accepted as Medical Evidence.

    Cheers
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    My equipment took 2 months from getting my report but I think it is supposed to be quicker...


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The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

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