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Dearest British Friends: No, the Chinese Don't Like Your Food Either Watch

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    When I moved here as a kid the first night we had fish and chips and it was the most awful thing I had ever tasted, far too greasy. Where I was brought up the food tended to be rather spicy and not as greasy so I just wasn't used to it. Eventually though the British Cuisine grows on you, and now I can proudly say that I love it. Nothing beats a well cooked Roast Dinner, Haggis, Fish & Chips, Black pudding, Marmite, Fry-ups, Hotpot, Shepard's Pie, Steak and Kidney pie and Yorkshire puddings. It is not the most elaborate cuisine, but its hearty and honest.
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    (Original post by lankymanky)
    Why'd you choose to study there of all places?
    it's only for one semester. it's a cool place, the food just sucks.
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    I live in Asia. All my colleagues tell me Western food is bland. The realtor tried to sell our apartment to us by telling us there's a 24 hour McDonalds nearby. Like we care.
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    I really miss food from home .
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    Never have I seen such misinformed and frankly stupid opinions outside of the Religion sub-forum.

    Regarding the article; Yes, I completely agree that the author came across as bigoted. I mean, under what context would the presence of tattoos and piercings be relevant to the quality of the food? Personally, I find them unattractive and in some cases revolting, but there is just no need to mention something like that at all. I am pretty damn sure that there are many young Chinese who have tattoos and piercings back in China.

    The author then goes on to insult the black pudding having describing it as if they had accidentally put something from the garbage into their mouth. It's fine if you don't like the food, just refrain from putting yourself across as some victim in a hostage situation. It's dramatisation for the sake of it and frankly horrible journalism.

    By the way, there are many dishes in China that utilise animal blood - my mother who grew up in Asia actually likes British blood pudding and would sometimes have it by itself as a snack.

    The rest of the article is comparatively uninteresting: apparently boiled vegetables aren't very tasty; pie crusts are hard and thick; and deep-fried fish tastes good when it's done well.

    However, the summarising paragraph struck me as surprisingly sage for such crude writing. The fact is, you don't know how much better you have it with the existence of foreign cuisine on this very island.

    Am I claiming that the French or the Chinese have saved us from what would be gastronomic purgatory? No, not necessarily, but we the British sure as hell are lacking in our effort to downright convince me otherwise. Let's look at a fairly popular and well-liked post earlier in the thread:

    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Wild Salmon, Smoked Salmon, Cromer Crab, Cornish Mussels

    Oysters, Dublin Prawns, Scallops, Lobster

    North Sea Plaice, John Dory, Sea Bass, Dover Sole, Turbot, Skate, Bream, Halibut, Mackerel

    Mowbray Pork Pies

    Huge variety of sausages from Cumberland Rings to Lincolnshire

    Cheeses: Stilton, Cheddar, Red Leicester, Welsh Goats, Ceerphilly.....

    Beetroot, Asparagus,

    Beef Wellington

    Devonshire Scone Teas

    Sandwiches, British Hams

    Yorkshire Pudding

    Rack of Lamb, Stuffed Pork Loin, Pork Belly, Braised Lamb Shoulder, Pork Chops, Crackling

    Game Pie, Rabbit,

    Best Bacon on the planet Have you even been to Hungary? Or even Spain for that matter?

    Venison

    Quail, Partridge, Grouse, Wood Pigeon,

    Sherry Trifle, Gingerbread, Rhubarb and Custard, Apple Crumble, Knickerbocker Glory, Carrot Cake

    Toffee Apple, Monmouth Pudding,

    Beers, Single Malt Whiskey, Cider, Scrumpy,
    In this post I have highlighted what we can actually call dishes i.e. a sufficiently complex serving of food derived from a structured system of processing ingredients. Everything else either is an ingredient, cheese, confectionery ('sweet' is hardly such a delicate taste such that it is deserving of intense consideration), or an alcoholic beverage.

    So what stands out amongst the dishes in your list? Well, for one thing they're all grey and boring (simultaneously meaning that nothing really does stand out). It's meat, and it's pastry, and just the thought of these dishes makes my throat dry up. Funnily enough, I don't actually hate any of it at all - Yorkshire Pudding is pretty damn tasty stuff for something so simple. But to raise any of the aforementioned up in triumph above your head as the epitome of British cuisine is simply embarassing. In fact, for those of you who hold British food in such high regard, how many of you know how to make a hot water crust? How many of your mothers know how to make a hot water crust? Do you even know what a hot water crust is?

    Now I'm not bashing on British food because of any inherent biases on my part, I just objectively see no reason why anyone would say 'no way, we have this, this, and this... etc' as opposed to 'yeah, it's a bit humdrum' without coming across as a naive chauvanist.

    To me, food that is representative of a nation's cuisine should be readily available throughout the region and should be enjoyed by all people regardless of class. In Japan, everyone from a small store owner to a wealthy businessman can be found eating ramen in a big bowl of hot broth with meat and veggies; in Italy, some antipasti before a plate of pasta tossed in a variety of sauces; and in Turkey perhaps little parcels of dolma followed by a slab of lahmacun.

    And here in the UK? Frankly, I have no idea. Sunday only comes once a week so that rules out a roast.

    British food is dreary but honestly, as much as I dislike it I dislike its defenders even more. But really, they can't be blamed. The UK has lost a lot of its former prestigious glow since WW2 and it's just a shame that its cuisine is one of the facets that some misguided fools use to latch on to whatever remaining glory this island nation once had.

    However, all is not doom and gloom. As noted (as in written, not recognised) in the quoted post, there is an abundance of high quality ingredients within Britain. The seafood is absolutely amazing and wonderful in its variety. If you can manage to get hold of any of the game here, it's earthy and delicious. There are many respected restaurants in the UK and even ones with Michelin stars that advertise their food as British. But ingredients can only take you so far. I mean, come on, even The Kitchin advertises the food as:

    ... modern British seasonal cuisine influenced by French cooking techniques.
    Wow, are British cooking techniques so bad that you have to cook stuff the French way? Wait, what British cooking techniques? (Let's see: 1. Wrapping in pastry; 2. Covering in gravy; 3. ... Can't think of anymore.)

    Now, before you all tuck into your Chili con Carne (which is American in origin by the way; even they have something so grossly popular that they can claim as their own), think about the last time you ever considered going out for 'English' or 'Scottish'. Personally if I wanted anything authentically Scottish in this oddly vibrant yet depressing city, I'd have to go the nearest chippy which strangely enough has some of the worst fish and chips that I've tasted in my life (I adore fish and chips... if done well). Add the fact that all the staff are genuine Scots and I'm really scratchin' my noggin'.

    Well, I guess it takes a few laps of the rat race before I can really enjoy true yummy British food.

    Bon appetit,

    A very much born-and-bred British student.

    P.S.

    (Original post by cl_steele)
    I will not hear a word against british cuisine from a people who eat their family pet and deep fry entire ducks then leave them in the window.
    Not sure how this fantastically idiotic comment managed to garner a single positive rep.

    1. If it ends up getting cooked, then it wasn't a pet in the first place. I believe the English term for it is 'livestock'.
    2. The ducks aren't deep fried, smartass.
    3. And they're in the window because potential customers will be able to see and smell their product, not because the Chinese are so horribly primitive they don't realise what food counters are for.
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    (Original post by K the Failure)
    Never have I seen such misinformed and frankly stupid opinions outside of the Religion sub-forum.

    Regarding the article; Yes, I completely agree that the author came across as bigoted. I mean, under what context would the presence of tattoos and piercings be relevant to the quality of the food? Personally, I find them unattractive and in some cases revolting, but there is just no need to mention something like that at all. I am pretty damn sure that there are many young Chinese who have tattoos and piercings back in China.

    The author then goes on to insult the black pudding having describing it as if they had accidentally put something from the garbage into their mouth. It's fine if you don't like the food, just refrain from putting yourself across as some victim in a hostage situation. It's dramatisation for the sake of it and frankly horrible journalism.

    By the way, there are many dishes in China that utilise animal blood - my mother who grew up in Asia actually likes British blood pudding and would sometimes have it by itself as a snack.

    The rest of the article is comparatively uninteresting: apparently boiled vegetables aren't very tasty; pie crusts are hard and thick; and deep-fried fish tastes good when it's done well.

    However, the summarising paragraph struck me as surprisingly sage for such crude writing. The fact is, you don't know how much better you have it with the existence of foreign cuisine on this very island.

    Am I claiming that the French or the Chinese have saved us from what would be gastronomic purgatory? No, not necessarily, but we the British sure as hell are lacking in our effort to downright convince me otherwise. Let's look at a fairly popular and well-liked post earlier in the thread:



    In this post I have highlighted what we can actually call dishes i.e. a sufficiently complex serving of food derived from a structured system of processing ingredients. Everything else either is an ingredient, cheese, confectionery ('sweet' is hardly such a delicate taste such that it is deserving of intense consideration), or an alcoholic beverage.

    So what stands out amongst the dishes in your list? Well, for one thing they're all grey and boring (simultaneously meaning that nothing really does stand out). It's meat, and it's pastry, and just the thought of these dishes makes my throat dry up. Funnily enough, I don't actually hate any of it at all - Yorkshire Pudding is pretty damn tasty stuff for something so simple. But to raise any of the aforementioned up in triumph above your head as the epitome of British cuisine is simply embarassing. In fact, for those of you who hold British food in such high regard, how many of you know how to make a hot water crust? How many of your mothers know how to make a hot water crust? Do you even know what a hot water crust is?

    Now I'm not bashing on British food because of any inherent biases on my part, I just objectively see no reason why anyone would say 'no way, we have this, this, and this... etc' as opposed to 'yeah, it's a bit humdrum' without coming across as a naive chauvanist.

    To me, food that is representative of a nation's cuisine should be readily available throughout the region and should be enjoyed by all people regardless of class. In Japan, everyone from a small store owner to a wealthy businessman can be found eating ramen in a big bowl of hot broth with meat and veggies; in Italy, some antipasti before a plate of pasta tossed in a variety of sauces; and in Turkey perhaps little parcels of dolma followed by a slab of lahmacun.

    And here in the UK? Frankly, I have no idea. Sunday only comes once a week so that rules out a roast.

    British food is dreary but honestly, as much as I dislike it I dislike its defenders even more. But really, they can't be blamed. The UK has lost a lot of its former prestigious glow since WW2 and it's just a shame that its cuisine is one of the facets that some misguided fools use to latch on to whatever remaining glory this island nation once had.

    However, all is not doom and gloom. As noted (as in written, not recognised) in the quoted post, there is an abundance of high quality ingredients within Britain. The seafood is absolutely amazing and wonderful in its variety. If you can manage to get hold of any of the game here, it's earthy and delicious. There are many respected restaurants in the UK and even ones with Michelin stars that advertise their food as British. But ingredients can only take you so far. I mean, come on, even The Kitchin advertises the food as:



    Wow, are British cooking techniques so bad that you have to cook stuff the French way? Wait, what British cooking techniques? (Let's see: 1. Wrapping in pastry; 2. Covering in gravy; 3. ... Can't think of anymore.)

    Now, before you all tuck into your Chili con Carne (which is American in origin by the way; even they have something so grossly popular that they can claim as their own), think about the last time you ever considered going out for 'English' or 'Scottish'. Personally if I wanted anything authentically Scottish in this oddly vibrant yet depressing city, I'd have to go the nearest chippy which strangely enough has some of the worst fish and chips that I've tasted in my life (I adore fish and chips... if done well). Add the fact that all the staff are genuine Scots and I'm really scratchin' my noggin'.

    Well, I guess it takes a few laps of the rat race before I can really enjoy true yummy British food.

    Bon appetit,

    A very much born-and-bred British student.

    P.S.



    Not sure how this fantastically idiotic comment managed to garner a single positive rep.

    1. If it ends up getting cooked, then it wasn't a pet in the first place. I believe the English term for it is 'livestock'.
    2. The ducks aren't deep fried, smartass.
    3. And they're in the window because potential customers will be able to see and smell their product, not because the Chinese are so horribly primitive they don't realise what food counters are for.
    It probably got repped because not everyone on this forum is mentally sub-normal such as yourself and can recognise a tongue in cheek remark.
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    I think the real tragedy is the peoples' lack of passion, knowledge and ability in cooking what is, good food.

    Venison, rabbit, chicken pie, beef steak are all components of excellent meals that are, quintessentially British and absolutely delicious when cooked well. But it's not just meat, we have an abundance of fungi and vegetables that can make for fantastic food. Roasted squash and wild mushroom risotto, mushroom stroganoff, buttered asparagus.

    To summarise:

    Excellent farm meat; we have some of the highest welfare standards in Europe and are renowned for our beef and game.
    We're surrounded by excellent seasonal fish such as Mackerel, Haddock, Salmon and Mussels (yes I know, not a fish...)
    and we have an excellent variety of vegetables.

    Simply, we need to recall how to cook it and I expect your own experiences have not been a best representation of what Britain can offer.
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    Two words: Mrs. Beeton
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    I will be honest with you, I am Asian and love fish and chips. However, I do use sauces with it because it can taste a bit like flour.

    But, fish and chips is good once in a while, not something I would eat everyday. However, the article writer seems to have been going to the wrong places. I mean B&B, seriously?
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    They clearly didn't dine at Greggs.
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    Well, I'm Norwegian, studying in England. English food is generally all right, though I find some things bland/awful, and I list some examples:

    Yorkshire Puddings - Bland. A delivery system for gravy, could be substituted with other, nicer, carbs.
    Full English Breakfast - Full of decently nice things, but don't really compliment each other, imo.
    Gravy - This is a hard one. Some gravy can be fantastic, but it's often made to an unsatisfactory standard.
    Pasties/pastry - By far the worst. Greasy and horrible, sausage rolls reminding me of vomit down a wet sock.
    Anything made within a pie, such as steak & red wine. I love steak and red wine, but this dish is disgusting.

    That's just my opinion. I'm sure it all comes down to personal preference, and what you're raised eating, though. Loads of English food, on the contrary, is delicious.
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    Ew! What kind of ****ed up person has cauliflower with a fry up? That's just wrong on so many levels. No wonder the article writer has been traumatised by British food.

    Also we like invented the Balti
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    You guys need to watch 'The Great British Menu'

    I'm Chinese, I love a good bit of Fish & Chips with LOADS of salt and vinegar!
 
 
 
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