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    (Original post by yaboy)
    Thats what happens anyway...
    From my experience of the education system, especially when it comes to senior school, the people at the best schools get the best results, regardless of intelligence and work ethic. Obviously there are many exceptions, this is just generally speaking.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    Since education at the moment seems to be geared towards university entry, and since university entry is crucial for the rest of your life, one must ask is it fair that one's parental income can determine your life chances and put you ahead of others?
    No. But hey ho, there's nothing we can really do about it sadly.
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    (Original post by Scott.M)
    From my experience of the education system, especially when it comes to senior school, the people at the best schools get the best results, regardless of intelligence and work ethic. Obviously there are many exceptions, this is just generally speaking.
    grade boundries and the education is made so that only a small percentage of students can do well tbh, obviously with the best resources will do the best but even if every school was the same the number of overall students failing and doing well will not change.

    Personally Im happy with idea of having private schools. (gonna get murdered for that comment)
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    grade boundries and the education is made so that only a small percentage of students can do well tbh, obviously with the best resources will do the best but even if every school was the same the number of overall students failing and doing well will not change.

    Personally Im happy with idea of having private schools. (gonna get murdered for that comment)
    Well that depends, do you attend one?

    They're probably great if you go to one. Who wouldn't want to go to one?
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    grade boundries and the education is made so that only a small percentage of students can do well tbh, obviously with the best resources will do the best but even if every school was the same the number of overall students failing and doing well will not change.

    Personally Im happy with idea of having private schools. (gonna get murdered for that comment)
    Nobody is asking for the number of people who fail and do well to change.

    What they are saying is that it is unfair that, like you said, the students with the best resources will probably do the best.

    The number of people who fail and do well should stay the same, but who fails and who does well should be determined by ability, not by who has the best resources available to them.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    Well that depends, do you attend one?

    They're probably great if you go to one. Who wouldn't want to go to one?
    Not for secondary school but the sixth form I currently go to is private.
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    (Original post by -strawberry-)
    I go to a private school. I am not rich. I only pay 50% fees. It really bugs me when people say you have to be rich to go to a private school, there are plenty of cheaper ones around than the likes of Eton etc.

    (Original post by TheBritishArmy)
    If people wish to provide a service and others wish to buy it, the state has no right to tell the parties involved that they cannot make this transaction.
    Ditto to both of those. I really can't be arsed to go through four pages of debate and pick through it all so I'll just say this. I went to a private school. It wasn't posh and the people who went weren't rich (well a lot of us anyway) we were just lucky that the situation of one or more of our parents or guardians allowed us to attend the school. Some had one or both parents in the military so the MOD footed the bill. Some, like myself, had one or more parents working for a company that was willing to foot at least part of the bill, allowing myself to have a good education. The same for my brother (who was also at a private school but a different one.) There were no guys called Tarquin or Jocelyn and there were no girls called Pandora who went on expensive skiing trips every summer. It was just a small school with 250 joe ordinary guys and girls.
    As for the OP, well the problem isn't actually private schools it's the public school system. If you want to shut down every single Private school you'll be forcing thousands upon thousands of kids to cram into state schools some of which are already full to the brim and in a state school system that is only partially working. Furthermore some private schools are able to spend more time providing more care to those with special needs and learning difficulties. Can the budget for the state school system really afford to provide the same for all those kids who would be joining?
    Furthermore, to close all private schools would mean a great deal less foreign students coming here. They wouldn't come here to attend out state schools assuming they would be let in at all since by that time all our state schools would be overflowing so much. Less foreign students means less money.
    The fact is, private schools strive to reach a higher standard for which some people are willing to pay, in some cases pay a lot. To disallow that is not only bad business but it's also bad for the education system. Fix the state school system and bring it up to or beyond the private school levels and then maybe, just maybe I'll entertain the idea. Until then it's a firm no from me.
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    Thats what happens anyway...
    No it doesn't - that's the problem.

    Private schools have a disproportionate amount of students who receive top grades in comparison to state schools. When someone gets AAA at state school they are often in the minority and it's clear they are the brightest of their year. At private, where you have over 50% achieving marks like this, how do you know who is the brightest? It's very hard to distinguish between those who are bright and those who are just exam technique masters.

    This is why some Universities, such as Bristol, have introduced 'contextual offers' where they may offer you AAB instead of AAA because of the school you went to. This is because it's evident that achieving AAB at an awful state school shows you are as bright as those who achieve at private school and are able to reach the AAA target.

    If we had no private schools, the percentage of those receiving AAA would fall and only those who truly worked for it would receive those grades.
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    (Original post by millie-rose)
    That's very true, but we cannot bring 'poor kids' up to the 'rich kids' level without having only one schooling system. Even if state schooling were to improve dramatically it still cannot compete with the small classes and salaries of private etc.
    I wonder how it would work though, I mean, who the hell is the government to try and tell some parent that they aren't allowed to give their kid a better education if they can afford it?
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    (Original post by LoseSmallWinBig)
    People tend to forget that sending your children to private school is about far more then getting 3 As at A-Level. Makes you far more cultured and wordily. I can speak three different languages and play two instruments, and have a good amount of extra curricular. Lots of my friends at state schools can only speak their native language, struggle to play any instrument and their only extra curricular is playing Fifa after school. All this hinders state scholars in the job markets, especially in the financial and legal sector.
    Often, I wish I'd had these kinds of opportunities at school. I see that attraction.


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    (Original post by millie-rose)
    No it doesn't - that's the problem.

    Private schools have a disproportionate amount of students who receive top grades in comparison to state schools. When someone gets AAA at state school they are often in the minority and it's clear they are the brightest of their year. At private, where you have over 50% achieving marks like this, how do you know who is the brightest? It's very hard to distinguish between those who are bright and those who are just exam technique masters.

    This is why some Universities, such as Bristol, have introduced 'contextual offers' where they may offer you AAB instead of AAA because of the school you went to. This is because it's evident that achieving AAB at an awful state school shows you are as bright as those who achieve at private school and are able to reach the AAA target.

    If we had no private schools, the percentage of those receiving AAA would fall and only those who truly worked for it would receive those grades.
    Personally think that is a ridiculous thing for a university to do.
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    Personally think that is a ridiculous thing for a university to do.
    How come?


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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    How come?


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    Just seems unfair on private school students that they have their requirements raised simply because their school is better than state schools yet they both are going to end up with the same degree.
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    Just seems unfair on private school students that they have their requirements raised simply because their school is better than state schools yet they both are going to end up with the same degree.
    Yeah, I see your point. I suppose the rationale is that the private school kids will have had a better education so will get higher grades even if their basic aptitude is no different.

    I quickly realised at uni that peoples' A-level grades had little bearing on their ability to do well in the style of learning required for a degree.


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    (Original post by Pikachu123)
    The ratio of intelligent:unintelligent people on studentroom is approximately 8:20
    I don't have time to respond in full, I just want to say - this really undermines your entire post. It makes it very difficult to take your argument seriously. Don't get me wrong, you brought up some interesting and valid points...but you're basically saying "Oh, and if you don't agree with me, then you're not intelligent! Hah, so there!".

    Just something to consider. Forgive me if I'm wrong, but I'm going to assume you're a teenager, likely still in high school. As a result, there are some things (like that last line of your post that I quoted) that you may think will show people just how clever you are. It actually just shows your immaturity. If you're really intelligent enough to construct a solid argument, then you should also be able to let your logic do the talking, instead of resorting to petty insults.
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    (Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
    I wonder how it would work though, I mean, who the hell is the government to try and tell some parent that they aren't allowed to give their kid a better education if they can afford it?
    but that works both ways... who the hell is the government to allow the rich to succeed in private schools whilst letting the majority fail in state because they can't afford it?
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    Just seems unfair on private school students that they have their requirements raised simply because their school is better than state schools yet they both are going to end up with the same degree.
    Yes i would argue that actually it could be slightly unfair on private school students, especially if they really struggled for that AAA and it really had nothing to do with the school.

    However, the unfairness in that situation is minor compared to the unfairness received by pupils in a state education. E.G. the fact that only 7% of the population go to private school yet the highest earning professions are over 80% private educated. Not to mention the vast extra curricular and small class available at private schools. That's why it would be much better if it were all state- there would be no need to mess around with contextual offers etc etc because those who have excelled in education will all have excelled within the same circumstances .

    So yes, it may be slightly unfair on private school kids, but in the long run, it's a very minor unfairness. Furthermore, apart from the top state schools a lot of children don't apply to russell groups such as Bristol anyway.
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    (Original post by millie-rose)
    Yes i would argue that actually it could be slightly unfair on private school students, especially if they really struggled for that AAA and it really had nothing to do with the school.

    However, the unfairness in that situation is minor compared to the unfairness received by pupils in a state education. E.G. the fact that only 7% of the population go to private school yet the highest earning professions are over 80% private educated. Not to mention the vast extra curricular and small class available at private schools. That's why it would be much better if it were all state- there would be no need to mess around with contextual offers etc etc because those who have excelled in education will all have excelled within the same circumstances

    So yes, it may be slightly unfair on private school kids, but in the long run, it's a very minor unfairness. Furthermore, apart from the top state schools a lot of children don't apply to russell groups such as Bristol anyway.

    I think you would be very surprised with the number of students which are not in top state schools that apply for russel group uni's is im frank, All of my mates from my secondary school that went on to the sixthform (the school was horrid) most managed to get offers at places like UCL, LSE, Imperial, Nottingham etc. I do think people overestimate how hard it really is to get into a russel group uni tbh.
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    Why should they be banned? They provide excellent opportunities for people to receive an above average education. Granted, most people cant afford it but if you go by that logic then institutions like the monarchy and the aristocracy should also be abolished.
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    Sick of hearing 'I'm not rich but I went to private school' in this thread. If your family had that much disposable income whilst mine lived on bread for a week every now and again, you're rich. Get over it, and wear it as a badge of honour.
 
 
 
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