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Private schools should be banned!!!!!!!! Watch

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    if people want to pay stupid money for education let them, you can still end up in the same if not better place than private school kids if you put the effort in lol
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    No need to ban private schools, the government needs to improve the standard of state schools so nobody wants to go to private schools.
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    No they shouldn't
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    (Original post by JouruKun)
    The state school that I attend takes part in MUN conferences such as RRSMUN, HMUN and so on and there is no doubt that it is dominated by private schools.

    However, this is no excuse for state schools not to take part. Our school goes to MUN events without too many problems as many of us can afford the price to go and there are also local charites that support us as they know that extra-curricular activities such as MUN are important.

    Private schools are pioneers in education and should not be removed.

    Education, for the most part, is what YOU make of it. Of course smaller class sizes and better resources help but these days (with resources such as the internet) they are barely an excuse.
    MUN was one example but okay.

    Education is what you make of it, someone who ****s around in class in a private school will still gets Us. What I am saying is that for some people, they require the benefits of private school to guide and direct them. You clearly don't need as much direction as others, but that doesn't mean you can slate people who do not do well. People are different.
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    (Original post by Calllu-m)
    MUN was one example but okay.

    Education is what you make of it, someone who ****s around in class in a private school will still gets Us. What I am saying is that for some people, they require the benefits of private school to guide and direct them. You clearly don't need as much direction as others, but that doesn't mean you can slate people who do not do well. People are different.
    I just wrote out a long paragraph but instead I will keep it simple.

    Some of us cannot afford private education and yes, that is unfortunate. Luckily enough, private education is not the only way to get a good education seeing as we have so many resources around us these days such as the internet, libraries and revision workshops.

    I wasn't slating anyone. Let me give you an analogy of kinds:

    State schools are like flour,
    Private schools are like self-raising flower,
    Just because one gives out more potential,
    Does not mean the other should give up.

    My state school is so terrible that come September it will become an academy after receiving a terrible Ofsted report. That doesn't mean I am going to give up just because my school is not as good as others.

    External help is offered everywhere through:

    Learning Support Center's within schools,
    External workshops
    Internal workshops

    and so on.
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    (Original post by JouruKun)
    I just wrote out a long paragraph but instead I will keep it simple.

    Some of us cannot afford private education and yes, that is unfortunate. Luckily enough, private education is not the only way to get a good education seeing as we have so many resources around us these days such as the internet, libraries and revision workshops.

    I wasn't slating anyone. Let me give you an analogy of kinds:

    State schools are like flour,
    Private schools are like self-raising flower,
    Just because one gives out more potential,
    Does not mean the other should give up.

    My state school is so terrible that come September it will become an academy after receiving a terrible Ofsted report. That doesn't mean I am going to give up just because my school is not as good as others.

    External help is offered everywhere through:

    Learning Support Center's within schools,
    External workshops
    Internal workshops

    and so on.
    Yes some state schools are good, but a lot aren't. Oh lord. Okay, you don't seem to understand that whilst YOU have motivation to strive for success, a lot won't as they feel they haven't for a support network within school/

    Learning support centres are often stigmatised as been exclusively for children with learning difficulties, so many people won't go. And others won't utilise them. You need to separate yourself, someone who clearly likes education, from the everyday pupil.
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    1- I did ok in my year 6 SATs, my friend did great. I went to a private school and got a lot attention in my small class sizes where the teachers made me aim for the A*s. I got all A*s and As at GCSE and have an offer to study medicine with A*/A predicted A-levels. My friend who was very bright, went to a state school (the best state school in the area out of 7), because she was good her teachers focussed less on her and more on the pupils that were struggling since her class had 32+ pupils (My largest class was 15). She did ok in her GCSEs but nothing special and is now predicted BCC at A-level. She got caught up in the system and I feel that is one area which state schools fall down in.

    2- A lot of people on this post have talked about the 'rich' going to private school. Around 40% of my school is made up of pupils from the RAF since their education is funded. So we do not have the 'elite' pupils, we just have those who's parents wish to utilise what money they have on good education.

    3- (Final point) I feel the 'private schools should be banned' notion is all down to stigma surrounding private schools based on the very expensive elite ones such has Eton and St Pauls. A statement such as that is very ignorant of you and maybe shows why private schools are better. No-one in my school would be so ignorant towards state schools. The pupils that attend both are no different so why create a divide when there isn't one?

    sorry its so long
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    Have you ever attended a private school yourself? I have attended one up until the age of sixteen, now I attend a state sixth form college. I understand exactly what you are saying and partly agree with the principle but parents shouldn't not send their children there, they have the choice and children at these schools are not spoon fed the information. Perhaps the learning environment is calmer but they have to work just as hard, if not harder, than those at state schools. We had to take all of our GCSE exams at the end of the year (before the government changed it so everyone did) and take iGCSEs (though some state schools do) which are all a lot more difficult especially considering at state schools pupils are given the chance to resist, resit, resit modules over and over until they get the best grades. We were actually at somewhat of a disadvantage and we had to work very very very hard. Not to say that students at state schools don't at all. So if the parents have the opportunity then of course they should send them there. The main differences are the atmosphere, food and facilities (which state schools have provided by the government anyway). Btw both of the schools I have been to have the same size classes.
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    They merely make the rich richer and reduces social mobility Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1401550859.816880.jpg
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    (Original post by -strawberry-)
    I go to a private school. I am not rich. I only pay 50% fees. It really bugs me when people say you have to be rich to go to a private school, there are plenty of cheaper ones around than the likes of Eton etc.
    I know it's an untrue stereotype, that you have to be rich to go to a private school. But responses like this bug me a little bit; private school students getting offended by the stereotype, and feeling such a strong need to distance themselves from it. They say "Don't generalise! We're not all rich!" as though it's something to be ashamed of.

    I went to considerably expensive private schools, because my parents could afford to pay 100% of the fees. I see no reason to make any apology for that.
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    i seriously cannot believe you started this thread...
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    (Original post by Pikachu123)
    I believe education should be a sector that should be completely government controlled; that is not to say I advocate following strict government curriculum, rather I believe that a child's basic education should not be influenced by factors such as wealth.

    If we are to improve the social mobility of the UK we must expose all children to the same quality of education; this is fundamental to our future generations' progress. Already there is a huge disparity between independent and state funded schools - it is evident by looking at the level of the Common Entrance exam.

    Some may argue that the wealthy will always find some means to improve their child's education even if independent schools were to be abolished, that is true; there is no denying that they have the option to send their child to a boarding school in a foreign country, however what happens outside the UK is not the jurisdiction of the UK, therefore should not affect a decision about ENGLISH education. Hiring private tutors is also an option, however hours outside of school is limited; therefore there is less of a difference between the level in which all children are educated at.

    Education is a fundamental human right, it is akin to being able to receive medical treatment. Should we not aspire to a better quality of these services for all? Not being able to even make an intelligent, informed decision in elections is an extremely sad state of affairs (which is 38.7% of us), every human being (in the UK) should receive the opportunity to enrich their mind to such a degree.

    Banning education would not worsen the experience for all; on the contrary there would be incentive for all (which will include the wealthy - those with the most power) to improve the educational sector and pressurize the government to invest in schools.

    Continuing to support independent schools is also a way of segregating those who are wealthy and those who are not; as a general rule. It makes the division between them stark and the wealthy will not be able to identify with those less fortunate, and vice versa. Both will be engulfed within their own 'culture' (evidently this is where the 'chav' culture arose). Being able to expose children to all different types of socioeconomic classes may eventually end the unfounded (and wholly ignorant,) hateful view of the upper echelons of society.

    That is why private schools should be banned, they really should be. Rant over.
    I know this topic has been covered over many times but I wanted to express my opinion and hope to provide a fresh perspective on this topic (and hopefully influence people into supporting the idea of banning private schools). What I don't understand is the fact that some people are unsupportive of this idea, I mean; their arguments are entirely founded on the basis of the child's right to a better education resting solely on the competence of their parents? Am I right? This doesn't make sense, people don't chose their parents...


    P.S. Sorry for any grammatical (or spelling) mistakes in this post.

    The ratio of intelligent:unintelligent people on studentroom is approximately 8:20
    People don't choose their parents. however if i was unhappy with the quality that the public education system provided why are you advocating for me to not be allowed to take my child to eton for instance? i'm a student at the moment but my question still stands.
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    It's more than the state shouldn't be able to curb what parents do with their money...

    Parents' success shouldn't influence the outcome of their children.
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    This is exactly what all parents want: they want to guarantee the success of their children, and if they are not super bright from day one, getting them into a private school which will help them develop and exploit their talents will give them a greater chance of success.

    I am one of those people. I used to have ADHD. I never wanted to work or focus on anything and although this still impacted my progress in the past, I would have been left behind in the dust at a school where there wasn't the kind of support that I have had at the private school which I attended, and I probably would never have gotten to the stage at I'm at now, being able to apply to top Russell Group universities and being confident of my success.

    The point I'm trying to make is that removing private schools is not going to solve the problem at all. If anything, the continued success of the private school system in a fairly socialist country like ours where things like education are a guaranteed right shows that the state provision for and its management of the UK's education system really isn't adequate enough for people to consider it as a safe way of guaranteeing their children the high grades they want them to aspire to.

    Just look at Finland for example; their education system works, and there are very few private schools, perhaps not even any private schools in their country, yet they consistently rank highly in the league tables (though I still believe it's inherently wrong and generalising to judge an entire education system by a set of numbers like that of the PISA tests) showing that at least in the state education sector, they must be doing something right.

    My sister worked in a rough school before joining the Civil Service. She has literally described the Department of Education to me once as "a place where ideas go to die" because of ignorant policy wonks thinking they know best and not actually achieving anything.

    She also suggested that the reason why a lot of state schools are failing was because students were not incentivised to be successful, and that no amount of enforced discipline could get the children to behave. Now, although obviously using the example of a rough school in Lewisham might be slightly biased towards the more extreme end of the scale, I think it is clear that the levels of pressure you are under at school does somewhat influence your own desire to succeed.

    At these super top public schools like Westminster, St Paul's Girls School, and Eton, I imagine that the pressure to get that A* is much more extreme than at your local comprehensive. And that is because people are paying money for those grades. They are incentivised to learn in lieu of their parents' financial investment into their academic future.

    My question is, why is this pressure missing from ordinary schools? I have a friend who left the private school I attended to go to a top grammar school nearby, well renowned for churning out large amounts of A* students, but he absolutely flopped at his AS levels, because at state schools, due to class size and scarcer resources, I'd imagine, there is much less pressure on individual students to succeed, and he'd been used to the spoon-feeding atmosphere of a private school.

    I reckon, that if people were pressured to get these grades not because they had a financial incentive, but they were able to more clearly understand the rewards that come with academic success, then, ordinary state schools will achieve much better results. I don't claim to be an expert on these issues. I only really have my experience in a private school, what my friends have told me and what I read about in the news to go on, but at the end of the day, what would be the point in utilising your educational opportunities if you couldn't see the value in it?
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    (Original post by Pikachu123)
    I believe education should be a sector that should be completely government controlled; that is not to say I advocate following strict government curriculum, rather I believe that a child's basic education should not be influenced by factors such as wealth.

    If we are to improve the social mobility of the UK we must expose all children to the same quality of education; this is fundamental to our future generations' progress. Already there is a huge disparity between independent and state funded schools - it is evident by looking at the level of the Common Entrance exam.

    Some may argue that the wealthy will always find some means to improve their child's education even if independent schools were to be abolished, that is true; there is no denying that they have the option to send their child to a boarding school in a foreign country, however what happens outside the UK is not the jurisdiction of the UK, therefore should not affect a decision about ENGLISH education. Hiring private tutors is also an option, however hours outside of school is limited; therefore there is less of a difference between the level in which all children are educated at.

    Education is a fundamental human right, it is akin to being able to receive medical treatment. Should we not aspire to a better quality of these services for all? Not being able to even make an intelligent, informed decision in elections is an extremely sad state of affairs (which is 38.7% of us), every human being (in the UK) should receive the opportunity to enrich their mind to such a degree.

    Banning education would not worsen the experience for all; on the contrary there would be incentive for all (which will include the wealthy - those with the most power) to improve the educational sector and pressurize the government to invest in schools.

    Continuing to support independent schools is also a way of segregating those who are wealthy and those who are not; as a general rule. It makes the division between them stark and the wealthy will not be able to identify with those less fortunate, and vice versa. Both will be engulfed within their own 'culture' (evidently this is where the 'chav' culture arose). Being able to expose children to all different types of socioeconomic classes may eventually end the unfounded (and wholly ignorant,) hateful view of the upper echelons of society.

    That is why private schools should be banned, they really should be. Rant over.
    I know this topic has been covered over many times but I wanted to express my opinion and hope to provide a fresh perspective on this topic (and hopefully influence people into supporting the idea of banning private schools). What I don't understand is the fact that some people are unsupportive of this idea, I mean; their arguments are entirely founded on the basis of the child's right to a better education resting solely on the competence of their parents? Am I right? This doesn't make sense, people don't chose their parents...


    P.S. Sorry for any grammatical (or spelling) mistakes in this post.

    The ratio of intelligent:unintelligent people on studentroom is approximately 8:20
    Why don't you just go all out and
    declare that you want a communist star with everyone who does not believe in equally jailed, people who homeschool their children declared as terrorists who refuse to allow the state control of their children etc. etc. Because we need central economic planning, government schooling and a media to tell you what to think.


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    Banning Private Schools - Trying to reduce inequality by dragging the rich down, instead of trying to lift up the poor. This is idiotic, I wonder if OP is a communist by any chance.
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    (Original post by Jonny360)
    Banning Private Schools - Trying to reduce inequality by dragging the rich down, instead of trying to lift up the poor. This is idiotic, I wonder if OP is a communist by any chance.
    If you lift up all the poor, they are still the poor, they're just moderately less poor and the rich are still richer than them, if you drag down the rich everyone is even. A warped logic which I can't agree with but that is how the concept works.

    As for this, I believe in equality of opportunity so being able to buy an advantage for your kid doesn't sit well with me. From age 5 you have attempted to elevate your kid beyond an average 5 year old by spending money. I don't think money should be able to do that in a country which professes fairness.
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    "They would rather the poor were poorer provided the rich were less rich" springs to mind -


    absolutely stupid idea to ban them


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    It would be illegal to ban private schools because like it or not private schools are not owned by the government they are businesses.

    It would be illegal to ban private schools because like it or not private schools are not owned by the government they are businesses. Under the law the government can impose restrictions on private schools but they CANNOT BAN THEM as they are a private business. Second of all it would go against the human rights act as it is the parents right to pay for their child to go into private education. If the government imposed a ban it would be classed as an illegal law as it comes close to dictatorship in the eyes of the court. Go on reply go. The idiots on here who say to ban them should look up business law and the fact that if they are privately owned the government cannot touch them as they are owned by the private sector. I know this as I am studying law for my business. Also check up on the human rights act.
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    Just because your family isn't rich enough...
 
 
 
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