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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    First launch i've watched live.

    Lots of talking.

    Thanks.
    My pleasure.

    8 minutes into the flight and everything's performing nominally, that's very good to hear.
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    (Original post by andersson)
    My pleasure.

    8 minutes into the flight and everything's performing nominally, that's very good to hear.
    Wonder what they would say if it wasn't.. "your all going to die" or .. "that's a negative".
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    Consider the European Space Agency as well.

    Or even the UK Space Agency, don't know too much about it though apart from that my lecturer used to be (probably still is) an advisor for them!

    And you can do a space medicine course at UCL (just as a module) where you get taught by awesome people who work for NASA
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    (Original post by dbkey)
    This shows the short-sightedness of your teachers, blinded by Oxbridge.

    As mentioned earlier by another reader, Imperial is renowned for engineering (and if you believe in league tables, ranks above Oxford for engineering in the latest tables).
    Oh do be quiet, you're talking nonsense. Nobody believes university rankings to that degree of accuracy for a second.

    Let's take a look at economics, for example:
    Oxford, LSE, Durham, Warwick, Cambridge, Kent, Dundee, Surrey, UCL.

    Clearly, the league tables don't focus on the quality of education, the standard of the course, the prestige etc. as it also takes into account more subjective things like 'student satisfaction'.
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    (Original post by Indecisive1)
    Do the course you want to do, not the course that the league tables tell you to do.
    The question is, would you have even got into Oxford/Cambridge/Imperial? If not, it makes your judgement somewhat flawed. I know lots of unintelligent students who bash Oxbridge and come up with pathetic reasons for 'not considering them' when in fact they were just not good enough and had to kid themselves.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Wonder what they would say if it wasn't.. "your all going to die" or .. "that's a negative".
    Sometimes they don't have time to exchange any dialogue on the situation, previous rockets have exploded while the astronauts were mid-sentence with Mission Control telling them how nominal operations are.
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    (Original post by Waterstorm)
    Consider the European Space Agency as well.

    Or even the UK Space Agency, don't know too much about it though apart from that my lecturer used to be (probably still is) an advisor for them!

    And you can do a space medicine course at UCL (just as a module) where you get taught by awesome people who work for NASA
    The UK Space Agency is complicated, I think it's more of the business side of things behind all of the British space industry companies like Astrium. Don't take that as a fact, it's just the gist I got from an email a UK Space Agency employee sent me.

    However, the European Space Agency looks great, they even have their own astronaut program (however, they send up far less astronauts than NASA). Over the course of this thread I've began to rule out NASA due to the difficulties of getting in for a foreigner. Thank you though!
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    Please help, is this a viable route into the space industry? I.E working for UK Space Agency, Nasa, or the ESC:


    4 years masters course in Mechanical engineering at university like Nottingham (that sort of ranking)
    9 Years in the RAF as an Aero-systems Engineering Offer (which completing an MSc in Aerospace Engineering and become accredited)
    3 year phD in Aerospace Engineering (or Science) hopefully being supported by the European space agency (ESE).


    I know it's probably not that well though out, bearing in mind I'm only 16
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    As has been said, the biggest stumbling block you're likely to find with NASA is your nationality. While astronauts from overseas are [relatively] common, the 'normal' engineering bodies on the ground are not. You're dealing with highly classified information and that sort of thing is usually only allowed to be seen by people who are American by birth [which, tbf, is the same as it is over here - you'd only be able to get certain jobs in Government service if you were British by birth].

    OP, is the European Space Agency not an option? They do just about as much work as NASA, all over the world, and would work closely with the Americans, without having to jump through their hoops for things. There are British astronauts working for them and there will be many British engineers/other technical staff on the ground in their various worldwide locations. Don't narrow yourself down so much.


    And remember, even companies you might think as 'boring' or not related to space often actually are involved. Rolls Royce, BAE Systems, etc.
    Actually, nationality isn't the biggest barrier in this regard. Yes, it's information classified above top secret, but you can be cleared for that in the UK or the US without holding birth nationality.

    Similar to the UK, you'll either have to be a US citizen or willing to give up your citizenship. Alongside this, you'll have a lengthy security clearance process, which takes a holistic view of your life history as part of that, and assesses your suitability to view said information on that basis. So long as you're not closely related to trouble, and it's clear that you don't have ulterior motives, life is good
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    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    Actually, nationality isn't the biggest barrier in this regard. Yes, it's information classified above top secret, but you can be cleared for that in the UK or the US without holding birth nationality.

    Similar to the UK, you'll either have to be a US citizen or willing to give up your citizenship. Alongside this, you'll have a lengthy security clearance process, which takes a holistic view of your life history as part of that, and assesses your suitability to view said information on that basis. So long as you're not closely related to trouble, and it's clear that you don't have ulterior motives, life is good
    How much could they actually find out about you? You know, with their security clearance. I have nothing to hide but I was wondering how far they can go. I know facebook is allowed to share your profile with companies, I wonder if they would dig through all your messages. Creepy to think about.
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    (Original post by andersson)
    How much could they actually find out about you? You know, with their security clearance. I have nothing to hide but I was wondering how far they can go. I know facebook is allowed to share your profile with companies, I wonder if they would dig through all your messages. Creepy to think about.
    Well I'm not a US law expert.

    In the UK the Interception of Communication Act and and Intelligence Services Act probably give enough power for them to, on national security grounds, intercept your communications, but I wouldn't see the need - security clearance isn't really about your personal life so much as motivations, and the potential to be bribed/blackmailed. So long as you're honest about yourself, and you're well-intended, then life is good.

    They'd be highly unlikely to ask Facebook for information on you, because that would disclose your identity, and people dealing with classified materials don't normally get their name put in the public domain too much for obvious reasons..
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    Please help, is this a viable route into the space industry? I.E working for UK Space Agency, Nasa, or the ESC:


    4 years masters course in Mechanical engineering at university like Nottingham (that sort of ranking)
    9 Years in the RAF as an Aero-systems Engineering Offer (which completing an MSc in Aerospace Engineering and become accredited)
    3 year phD in Aerospace Engineering (or Science) hopefully being supported by the European space agency (ESE).


    I know it's probably not that well though out, bearing in mind I'm only 16
    I'm no expert, but I have been putting a bit of research into this subject. I think that would be fine, your service for the RAF should be sufficient work experience. You should also look into graduate degrees.
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    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    Well I'm not a US law expert.

    In the UK the Interception of Communication Act and and Intelligence Services Act probably give enough power for them to, on national security grounds, intercept your communications, but I wouldn't see the need - security clearance isn't really about your personal life so much as motivations, and the potential to be bribed/blackmailed. So long as you're honest about yourself, and you're well-intended, then life is good.

    They'd be highly unlikely to ask Facebook for information on you, because that would disclose your identity, and people dealing with classified materials don't normally get their name put in the public domain too much for obvious reasons..
    Ah, thank you. I don't have anything to hide on facebook either but it is, as you said, my personal life. Anyway, I think I'd rather work closer to home i.e. Europe, which I doubt will have such an intense security check as somewhere further away like the USA.
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    (Original post by andersson)
    I'm no expert, but I have been putting a bit of research into this subject. I think that would be fine, your service for the RAF should be sufficient work experience. You should also look into graduate degrees.
    ah cool man, yeah i was thinking of doing a masters in either Aerospace Engineering or Physics in the RAF.
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    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    Actually, nationality isn't the biggest barrier in this regard. Yes, it's information classified above top secret, but you can be cleared for that in the UK or the US without holding birth nationality.

    Similar to the UK, you'll either have to be a US citizen or willing to give up your citizenship. Alongside this, you'll have a lengthy security clearance process, which takes a holistic view of your life history as part of that, and assesses your suitability to view said information on that basis. So long as you're not closely related to trouble, and it's clear that you don't have ulterior motives, life is good
    How do they do that?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    How do they do that?
    Interviews, family trees, speaking to people you work, study, socialise with, family, financial history, criminal records check, health assessment, drugs tests, medical history, public profile, etc. DV for top secret and above process takes 6-9 months.
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    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    Interviews, family trees, speaking to people you work, study, socialise with, family, financial history, criminal records check, health assessment, drugs tests, medical history, public profile, etc. DV for top secret and above process takes 6-9 months.
    Yeah. A tendency to mismanage finances and get into heavy debt could make you susceptible to blackmail. Likewise, sleeping with everyone new you meet in a bar is a risk. But even things out of your control like your Uncle's time in the communist party as a student could be a risk I suppose, as it could mean that there are family connections with ‘undesirables’.
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    Lots of talk today about NASA pumping money into fusion engine research as such engines now look viable within the next 10 years. 30 days to get to Mars. One area of study to concentrate on then.
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    (Original post by Nitebot)
    Lots of talk today about NASA pumping money into fusion engine research as such engines now look viable within the next 10 years. 30 days to get to Mars. One area of study to concentrate on then.
    Given that the earliest timescale for fusion power to be commercial is in the 2040's, i'm very skeptical that they could do it so quickly.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Given that the earliest timescale for fusion power to be commercial is in the 2040's, i'm very skeptical that they could do it so quickly.
    Surprised me too! If the research goes well, the private space companies might start throwing money into development.
 
 
 
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