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    Hello

    Please grade the following brief commentary by me on the play 'An Ideal Husband' by Oscar Wilde. (I just want to get some idea as to where I stand, how far I am from an A.) I would be v v thankful to you.

    So, plz, plz, simply put a grade you think it fits in...

    Describe Wilde’s presentation of the relationship between Lady Chiltern and Mrs. Cheveley and its significance for the play as a whole.
    Ans:
    Wilde presents the relationship between Lady Chiltern and Mrs. Cheveley as one embodying difference of attitudes about morality, differences of character, differences of priorities, etc, thus indicating that it is brimming with disagreement and conflict. Regardless of the unpleasant quality of the relationship between the two, it contributes to the complexity of the plot as well as enhancing the dominant theme in the play, that is, the analysis of morality and moral dilemmas.

    The relationship between the two women is portrayed, from the every outset of the play, as distant nad cold. Their very fist meeting in the play is full of subtle clues such as Lady Chiltern’s manner of bowing t Mrs Chevely (states as ‘rather distant’ by Wilde), her manner of talking to Mrs. Chevley (‘cold’), etc which hint at their unpleasant relationship. The conflict in it is actually the consequence of their different attitudes about morality – ‘Lady Chiltern always got the good conduct prize [in school]’ as Mrs. Cheveley mentions; ‘Mrs. Cheveley was sent away for being a thief’ Laday Chiltern says about her. The conflict between them is therefore rooted in their different moral stances, evident from Mrs. Cheveley’s words to Lord Goring about Lady Chiltern: ‘You know Gertrude has always worn [gloves of] seven and three-quarters? That is one of the reasons why there was never any moral sympathy between us….’. The ‘moral sympathy’ she is taling about can only exist between people who have the same moral stances. However, since Lady Chiltern’s and Mrs. Cheveley’s moral attitudes are entirely dissimilar (the former covers larger part of her arms as compared to the latter), there is no moral sympathy’ between them. Lord Goring’s philosophical observation in Act II very clearly shows that Mrs. Cheveley’s attitude: ‘Well, she wore far too much rouge last night and not enough clothes…’

    Wilde uses the conflict between the two apparently different characters as a tool to point out that the notion of morality was often considered as hypocrisy: ‘Morality is simply the attitude we adopt towards people whom we personally dislike.’ Mrs. Cheveley retorts when Lady Chiltern is criticizing the former’s ‘dishonest and dishonorable deeds. Mrs. Chevley thinks that Lady Chiltern only uses morality as a weapon for criticizing her as and that she is thus acting like a hypocrite. By showing the attitude of Mrs. Cheveley towards Lady Chiltern in this light, Wilde has in a way ridiculed the concept of morality as something of pretence, but one which the Victorian society highly valued and praised.
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    (Original post by methewthomson)
    Hello

    Please grade the following brief commentary by me on the play 'An Ideal Husband' by Oscar Wilde. (I just want to get some idea as to where I stand, how far I am from an A.) I would be v v thankful to you.

    So, plz, plz, simply put a grade you think it fits in...

    Describe Wilde’s presentation of the relationship between Lady Chiltern and Mrs. Cheveley and its significance for the play as a whole.
    Ans:
    Wilde presents the relationship between Lady Chiltern and Mrs. Cheveley as one embodying difference of attitudes about morality, differences of character, differences of priorities, etc, thus indicating that it is brimming with disagreement and conflict. Regardless of the unpleasant quality of the relationship between the two, it contributes to the complexity of the plot as well as enhancing the dominant theme in the play, that is, the analysis of morality and moral dilemmas.

    The relationship between the two women is portrayed, from the every outset of the play, as distant nad cold. Their very fist meeting in the play is full of subtle clues such as Lady Chiltern’s manner of bowing t Mrs Chevely (states as ‘rather distant’ by Wilde), her manner of talking to Mrs. Chevley (‘cold’), etc which hint at their unpleasant relationship. The conflict in it is actually the consequence of their different attitudes about morality – ‘Lady Chiltern always got the good conduct prize [in school]’ as Mrs. Cheveley mentions; ‘Mrs. Cheveley was sent away for being a thief’ Laday Chiltern says about her. The conflict between them is therefore rooted in their different moral stances, evident from Mrs. Cheveley’s words to Lord Goring about Lady Chiltern: ‘You know Gertrude has always worn [gloves of] seven and three-quarters? That is one of the reasons why there was never any moral sympathy between us….’. The ‘moral sympathy’ she is taling about can only exist between people who have the same moral stances. However, since Lady Chiltern’s and Mrs. Cheveley’s moral attitudes are entirely dissimilar (the former covers larger part of her arms as compared to the latter), there is no moral sympathy’ between them. Lord Goring’s philosophical observation in Act II very clearly shows that Mrs. Cheveley’s attitude: ‘Well, she wore far too much rouge last night and not enough clothes…’

    Wilde uses the conflict between the two apparently different characters as a tool to point out that the notion of morality was often considered as hypocrisy: ‘Morality is simply the attitude we adopt towards people whom we personally dislike.’ Mrs. Cheveley retorts when Lady Chiltern is criticizing the former’s ‘dishonest and dishonorable deeds. Mrs. Chevley thinks that Lady Chiltern only uses morality as a weapon for criticizing her as and that she is thus acting like a hypocrite. By showing the attitude of Mrs. Cheveley towards Lady Chiltern in this light, Wilde has in a way ridiculed the concept of morality as something of pretence, but one which the Victorian society highly valued and praised.
    I would award this a Mid B Grade, you're not too far off an A
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    (Original post by 002)
    I would award this a Mid B Grade, you're not too far off an A
    Thank u v v v much for replying me.

    I'm indeed very grateful to u for this.

    I'm surprised and immensely delighted to be Awarded a mid B...hurray.

    But may I ask, if you don't mind, what grade you got in your A level English Literature and from which board?

    Very many thanks....

    bye.
 
 
 
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