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    Just read my last post and it looks sarcastc, I assure you it isnt.
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    (Original post by samd294)
    have you read the rest of the thread ? Please do. We are not talking about exam nerves here.
    I know. I'm just trying to show how people seem to get far more easily depressed today than they did 3 or 4 generations ago.
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    (Original post by jammyd)
    Go to GP - he/she can put you in touch with a counselling service for teenagers
    I have actually been to the doctor, although it was for a cold, and he told me that I was anxious, and that my blood pressure and pulse rate showed this. But I haven't had a panic attack for about 9 months.
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    (Original post by Annika17)
    I'm thinking that maybe I should try counselling, but it will be hard because I'm normally the type of person who helps evrybody with their problems, rather than talking about my own.
    But then, saying that, maybe trying to be strong has played a part in everything. Maybe I should've asked for help ages ago.
    I know what you mean. I'm exactly the same.
    Maybe it would help talking to a stranger rather than friends, because theres nothing to lose with a councellor, but friendships are more valuable, although i don't believe that if you talked to your friends about it, that they'd have a problem with it.
    They'd probably be happy to help!
    Or simply talking to someone on the net could be useful. Thats how i generally talk about my problems, with my mates on the net. There's no pressure there, no expectation, no judgement.

    If you want to chat to me about it, i'd be happy to help.
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    (Original post by samd294)
    You are a greater man than I. I salute you.
    Hahaha!!!
    If greatness is measured by sheer wierdness, then maybe.
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    If you have a strong relationship with somebody, friend or family, and by that I mean somebody who you feel able to talk with openly, I think that they can be as good as professional help because they know you already, and maybe have an understanding of your situation. If they can give out even handed unemotional advice too them you have a gem, and should use them to chat with
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    (Original post by Iluvatar)
    I know what you mean. I'm exactly the same.
    Maybe it would help talking to a stranger rather than friends, because theres nothing to lose with a councellor, but friendships are more valuable, although i don't believe that if you talked to your friends about it, that they'd have a problem with it.
    They'd probably be happy to help!
    Or simply talking to someone on the net could be useful. Thats how i generally talk about my problems, with my mates on the net. There's no pressure there, no expectation, no judgement.

    If you want to chat to me about it, i'd be happy to help.

    well, talking to everybody on here today has kind of helped. Sometimes its good to talk to someone who doesn't know you, that's what I think anyway.
    Besides, I'm probably not the only person who's had to come to terms with a death.
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    (Original post by Kurdt Morello)
    one should be strong enough to deal with their problems - i was 'depressed' last year in a sense - exams were a drag - but i got through it and i am happy now
    I'd say the problem here is that you're misunderstanding what depression is. It's not feeling sad or feeling like you can't cope - it is an actual medical problem. Everyone feels down, like I would assume you did last year, but that isn't depression. Of course you can pull yourself up out of being sad, but trying to pull yourself out of depression is something completely different.

    Of course, I may be wrong, and perhaps you were actually depressed. I'd just be doubtful if all it was was feeling down for a short while, as what you said suggested.
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    (Original post by Annika17)
    well, talking to everybody on here today has kind of helped. Sometimes its good to talk to someone who doesn't know you, that's what I think anyway.
    Besides, I'm probably not the only person who's had to come to terms with a death.
    or in my case, two deaths.
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    (Original post by Annika17)
    well, talking to everybody on here today has kind of helped. Sometimes its good to talk to someone who doesn't know you, that's what I think anyway.
    Besides, I'm probably not the only person who's had to come to terms with a death.
    i actually lost my gran when i was about 7 years old, she was the closest person in my life, and she died while i was asleep in her lap. that hurt, i know how it feels to lose someone, if you want to talk im here. just say,
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    i think im startin to fall into depression.. and im normally such a happy perosn
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    (Original post by Annika17)
    or in my case, two deaths.
    Death is a part of life, i'm afraid.
    And you certainly aren't the only person who has had to deal with it.
    Its a shame, but life's like that.
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    (Original post by mad kuri)
    i actually lost my gran when i was about 7 years old, she was the closest person in my life, and she died while i was asleep in her lap. that hurt, i know how it feels to lose someone, if you want to talk im here. just say,
    Its just so difficult to cope with, at first it seemed unreal. It didn't seem real when they died, because they were just kids, and they looked like they were sleeping. But I wish they had woken up, or showed some signs of getting better.
    I find it really hard to believe that the world is full of rapists, murders etc, and it's my two innocent cousins that lost their lives. And they were only 3 and 5 years old. But its happened.
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    (Original post by Annika17)
    Its just so difficult to cope with, at first it seemed unreal. It didn't seem real when they died, because they were just kids, and they looked like they were sleeping. But I wish they had woken up, or showed some signs of getting better.
    I find it really hard to believe that the world is full of rapists, murders etc, and it's my two innocent cousins that lost their lives. And they were only 3 and 5 years old. But its happened.
    i know, it is hard, especially as they were so young, i feel for you, i think its horrible when a young child loses their life. and its true, there are all sorts of rapists, child abusers, murderers etc.. but its the innocent who lose their lives, it isn't fair i know, but it happens. and no matter what we do we can't stop it, it's meant to be so therefore it is.
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    (Original post by Kirki)
    I'd say the problem here is that you're misunderstanding what depression is. It's not feeling sad or feeling like you can't cope - it is an actual medical problem. Everyone feels down, like I would assume you did last year, but that isn't depression. Of course you can pull yourself up out of being sad, but trying to pull yourself out of depression is something completely different.

    Of course, I may be wrong, and perhaps you were actually depressed. I'd just be doubtful if all it was was feeling down for a short while, as what you said suggested.
    Yeh I agree fully. Speak to somebody who knows, like a doctor. There is a huge yet apparently subtle difference between being upset/miserable, and being depressed. As you have these sad events in your life at the moment, it might well be the former, which believe it or not is good news
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    (Original post by Annika17)
    What's the best way to get out of depression, without resorting to anti-depressants or seeing a counsellor?

    I wouldn't bother asking, but as it's affecting my A-level studies, I'm abit worried.
    Any advice please?

    Have a Spliff. It usually works for me.
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    (Original post by HamaL)
    Have a Spliff. It usually works for me.
    your not one of them boys who turn to spliff every five second are you? (assuming you are a guy)
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    (Original post by mad kuri)
    your not one of them boys who turn to spliff every five second are you? (assuming you are a guy)
    ...last time i had some was about 10 days ago...
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    (Original post by HamaL)
    ...last time i had some was about 10 days ago...
    so your not as bad as my boys then. they're at it 24-7. i think you've got the right idea.
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    i had clinical depression a couple of years ago when i was 16 so i kind of know what you're going through. the worst thing i found about it was that i felt that it would never end. i thought i would always be a walking misery, hating myself and everyone else around me. i was completely misanthropic, dropped out of college to work full time at mcdonalds ( :rolleyes: ) and in general i just didn't care enough to even get out of bed in the morning. i can remember wanting to die for almost an entire year before i got some help (or was rather forced to get help by my friends). it was the worst time of my life, but it does get better, the first step is actually admitting that you have and illness and need some help. it was hard for me because i hate talking about my feelings with people, but counselling (well, psychotherapy) really helped to straighten my head out. it allows you to talk openly about your feelings without being judged for what you have to say. it doesn't work for everyone, but it is worth giving it a try.

    alternatively if you want to talk to someone that understands what you're going though ring the samaritans, i work there as a volunteer and many other people i know who work there have been through similar problems so will be able to give you an empathetic ear. just don't do as i did and let it fester over time, putting off getting help really doesn't work and only makes the problem much worse when the day comes you have to deal with it.

    if you feel like talkign PM me
 
 
 
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