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Physics is just so unbearably interesting. Watch

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    Hi, here's my problem, basically i'm going to university to study MEng in Chemical engineering next year (2014), i can't really study physics as for some stupid reason, i never took it in sixth form, and don't think i would be successful in research, as much as it pains me to admit.

    Anyway, ChemEng looks like a cool course which involves a lot of physics, but how much exactly? Like are there any really interesting bits of physics just as the fundamental principles of the universe, Einstein theory of relativity etc?

    Finally, would it be totally stupid to do a Physics MSc after my ChemEng Masters, just literally from the point of view that i find it very interesting? Would it at all help me in the world of chemical engineering?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    Hi, here's my problem, basically i'm going to university to study MEng in Chemical engineering next year (2014), i can't really study physics as for some stupid reason, i never took it in sixth form, and don't think i would be successful in research, as much as it pains me to admit.

    Anyway, ChemEng looks like a cool course which involves a lot of physics, but how much exactly? Like are there any really interesting bits of physics just as the fundamental principles of the universe, Einstein theory of relativity etc?

    Finally, would it be totally stupid to do a Physics MSc after my ChemEng Masters, just literally from the point of view that i find it very interesting? Would it at all help me in the world of chemical engineering?

    Thanks
    I don't think it would involve any of this.. could you not take a year out to do Physics A level and re-apply if it's what you really want to do. How are your grades? Did you take maths?
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    Hi, here's my problem, basically i'm going to university to study MEng in Chemical engineering next year (2014), i can't really study physics as for some stupid reason, i never took it in sixth form, and don't think i would be successful in research, as much as it pains me to admit.

    Anyway, ChemEng looks like a cool course which involves a lot of physics, but how much exactly? Like are there any really interesting bits of physics just as the fundamental principles of the universe, Einstein theory of relativity etc?

    Finally, would it be totally stupid to do a Physics MSc after my ChemEng Masters, just literally from the point of view that i find it very interesting? Would it at all help me in the world of chemical engineering?

    Thanks
    is mostly thermodynamics and maybe statistical quantum mechanics (theoretical chemistry for kinetics)
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    (Original post by Mullah.S)
    is mostly thermodynamics and maybe statistical quantum mechanics (theoretical chemistry for kinetics)
    Right, so not really much particle physics etc?
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    (Original post by TheRandomer)
    I don't think it would involve any of this.. could you not take a year out to do Physics A level and re-apply if it's what you really want to do. How are your grades? Did you take maths?
    I could, but it's like i said, i really don't want to base my career on physics, as i would feel to strongly inclined to go into research and i don't think i would be that successful, i'd rather study something with a more direct job route, then study a MSc in physics which may possibly help me in some chemical engineering research? (sorry if it sounds like i contradicted myself in terms of research)
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    Right, so not really much particle physics etc?
    almost mainly thermodynamics.

    unless you can telling me how you are going to engineer some chemicals using a particle collider.

    how old are you?
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    (Original post by Mullah.S)
    almost mainly thermodynamics.

    unless you can telling me how you are going to engineer some chemicals using a particle collider.

    how old are you?
    right, i'm just looking for an excuse to study some p. physics haha! I'm 126
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    right, i'm just looking for an excuse to study some p. physics haha! I'm 126
    that is meaning you are 15-17
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    I'm 126
    Wow!

    :mmm:
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    I could, but it's like i said, i really don't want to base my career on physics, as i would feel to strongly inclined to go into research and i don't think i would be that successful, i'd rather study something with a more direct job route, then study a MSc in physics which may possibly help me in some chemical engineering research? (sorry if it sounds like i contradicted myself in terms of research)
    An MSc in physics a) isn't that widely available b) tends to be specific to a very particular area and c) would be almost useless for a career in chemical engineering. Why do you want to do chemical engineering research but not physics research? Why don't you do physics and then see what jobs are available instead? It's a very versatile degree, and it's also very difficult to get a PhD place even if you wanted one!
    How sure are you that you want to do chemical engineering? If you're not 100% sure at this stage then you'll be in trouble 2/3 years down the line..
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    Also you do realise that you have to pay to do a masters degree? It's a lot of money if it won't help your career.
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    Physics at university is completely different to how people expect it to be, Yes, the facts are incredibly interesting, but f=do you want to spend six pages deriving them? Depending upon the university, you can probably take an unusual option or two from the physics department. Aside from that, try reading some books by Brian Greene - I found him to be the best pop science author for physics.
 
 
 
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