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    I have applied for apparently two different courses:
    • English and German at University of Nottingham
    • ...and English Language and German Studies at Lancaster University.
    I received conditional offers for both course but now I am facing a dilemma. What is the difference between those courses? What are the career opportunities? What should I chose?

    I would really appreciate your help!
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    It appears one is a challenging modern languages course at a reputable university, while the other is probably an easier course at a worse university.
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    (Original post by Azarimanka)
    It appears one is a challenging modern languages course at a reputable university, while the other is probably an easier course at a worse university.
    And which one would you suggest ultimately?
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    (Original post by Ruca)
    And which one would you suggest ultimately?
    Nottingham. IT might actually challenge you.
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    There is no difference between 'German' and 'German Studies', 'French' and 'French Studies' or 'Spanish' and 'Hispanic Studies' (the latter being a possible exception as some universities enforce the study of a second Iberian language such as Catalan within their 'Hispanic' degrees). It just depends on the naming preference of a particular university. No university offers both a BA German and a BA German Studies, because these are one and the same course.

    A German degree, whether named 'German' or 'German Studies,' will involve study of German language and literature alongside optional courses in culturally-specific film/history/society modules.

    I think universities often tack the 'Studies' part onto language degrees because they argue (rightly) that their language courses cover much more than just language study. They possibly think it makes the degree sound more impressive, or just prefer the name. What they don't seem to realize is that adding the 'Studies' part can devalue the degree for some people/employers by making it sound like an easier/soft option degree. In reality, a 'German Studies' degree is a degree in German by another name.

    That said, Nottingham has a better reputation overall than Lancaster, although I'm not sure if this also applies to its German department.
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    (Original post by standreams)
    There is no difference between 'German' and 'German Studies', 'French' and 'French Studies' or 'Spanish' and 'Hispanic Studies' (the latter being a possible exception as some universities enforce the study of a second Iberian language such as Catalan within their 'Hispanic' degrees). It just depends on the naming preference of a particular university. No university offers both a BA German and a BA German Studies, because these are one and the same course.

    A German degree, whether named 'German' or 'German Studies,' will involve study of German language and literature alongside optional courses in culturally-specific film/history/society modules.

    I think universities often tack the 'Studies' part onto language degrees because they argue (rightly) that their language courses cover much more than just language study. They possibly think it makes the degree sound more impressive, or just prefer the name. What they don't seem to realize is that adding the 'Studies' part can devalue the degree for some people/employers by making it sound like an easier/soft option degree. In reality, a 'German Studies' degree is a degree in German by another name.

    That said, Nottingham has a better reputation overall than Lancaster, although I'm not sure if this also applies to its German department.
    I agree with you! At first the "German Studies" offered me the impression that the course would focus more on the society and culture rather than the language itself. Thank you very much for your response! It was really helpful.

    And I would like to ask you one more question: which one would you ultimately choose?
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    (Original post by Azarimanka)
    Nottingham. IT might actually challenge you.
    Thank you! It was anyway my firm choice.
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    (Original post by Ruca)
    I agree with you! At first the "German Studies" offered me the impression that the course would focus more on the society and culture rather than the language itself. Thank you very much for your response! It was really helpful.

    And I would like to ask you one more question: which one would you ultimately choose?
    You're welcome. Some universities (Salford I believe is one) tend to focus more on pure language skills rather than history/society, but the majority of universities offer a range of modules in various areas (film, literature, society etc), whether they call their degree BA Language or BA Language Studies.

    I don't know much about the language departments at either university, but based on general reputation, Nottingham.
 
 
 
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