Private Tutoring - GCSE English - Where do I find the curriculum/syllabus?

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Rhubarb_Rose
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Hi,

I am thinking of becoming a private tutor to teach GCSE English Literature. I think it will be a good way to supplement my current salary. I also have a degree in English Literature and I really think I will enjoy teaching the subject.
I am currently trying to find out more about the different examining boards/curriculum's that are followed. So far I have noted the following examining boards down;

AQA

EDEXCEL

OCR

Are these the only examining boards for English Literature? Is there any way to request information on the curriculum/syllabus so that I have something to follow and also to gain a solid understanding of what students have to study.

Please inform me of where I can get hold of the curriculum and if anyone has privately tutored before - please share your thoughts and tips.

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Last edited by Professor Oak; 2 years ago
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Suzanathema
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There is also WJEC, which is quite popular.

You can download the information you need from the exam board website.


GCSE is going linear so if you are tutoring a Year 10, you need to download the newer spec.
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ellierany
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Find it on the exam board websites. Don't bother learning them off by heart just yet, because they all have lots of little variations, and presumably you will be tutoring to supplement school learning (I certainly was), so whatever you teach will have to fit around what the student is doing in school.

That said, once you know what they're doing, knowing which essays andexams test which skills on their syllabus, and what the time limits/points available/grade boundaries for each are will be very useful, because the kid probably won't have a clue (I don't know why they never seem to know - I knew the syllabus off by heart when I was their age) and their parents are probably paying you to boost them over a grade boundary they're just below.

You have to be flexible. It's useful to get the kid to email or text you in advance to let you know what piece of work they want you to look at with them that week as then you'll actually be able to prepare! Otherwise you may end up preparing for something you never tutor them in.

It might be worth tutoring in English Language as well, as your pupils will be doing both in the same classes, and will probably do language for a few weeks followed by literature for a few weeks, rather than both simultaneously (literature comes up a lot in the language syllabus too, especially Shakespeare!)
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rachelsays
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As everyone has already said, everything is readily available from the exam board websites. There are subtle differences between linear (exams at the end of Year 11 only) and modular (controlled assessments take place throughout the two years as well as final exams to spread the load) GCSEs so make sure you have the right one.

Also, as you'll see, each exam board will probably have an A and B choice that schools can decide between, and within those choices there will be further choices of texts. So you will need to get a good deal of information from your tutee before you get started as everything is very generalised.

Once you know what exact exam board, syllabus and texts your student is following, make sure you get a copy of the relevant mark scheme(s) - also on the exam board websites - so that you know exactly what your tutee needs to do to meet each grade band. For example, in the WJEC descriptive writing controlled assessment mark scheme, a B grade student will use a range of vocabulary - an A grade student will use a range of ambitious vocabulary. The differences are subtle but vital if you want to move them up a grade!

I am a tutor alongside being a teacher and I use the website First Tutors. It's free to join and I've had a lot of business from it. Don't be tempted to offer rock bottom prices to get interest quickly - charge a fair price and don't forget to include any petrol and prep time costs. Often the more expensive you are, the more sought after you'll be, as high cost implies high quality! I wouldn't go any lower than £30 an hour.

Good luck with it - I love tutoring and it's a great way to earn some extra cash.
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shorty.loves.angels
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Wait until you meet your first tutee, find out which examboard they are sitting with and what area they are currently studying. Then you can spend a bit of time familiarising yourself and getting together any resources you need.

How are you going about tutoring? I've been tutoring in maths for a couple of years so just interested

I pretty much agree with above, although I went really cheap because I wanted a range of students in a short space of time and wasn't doing it for the money
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