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Still unemployed after nearly a year graduating!! Watch

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    This is 2013, not 1950. Most people have a degree now, get over yourself. It's not exactly unusual for people with a degree to have to do low-pay work as their first job after graduation. Just look at the percentages of how many people don't have a job 6 months after graduation, some are as high as 70%. Surely working at the checkout in Tesco is better than fretting over not getting any proper income (apart from JSA, which you probably aren't entitled to as you aren't actively looking for any sort of work)?
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    With all due respect to the OP, I agree with what most posters have said - you need to perhaps set your (initial) sights lower. This doesn't mean necessarily accepting a life of drudgery, but rather just working harder to get through the ranks.

    I'll give myself as a good example -

    Graduated in 2010 with a 2:2 in Law from a redbrick uni (no excuse for the degree classification, sadly just didn't work hard enough.) Went travelling for 3 months, then came back expecting to roll into a high-paying grad job - didn't happen, of course.

    But, rather than getting despondent, I networked to the max. and - after 2 months of job-hunting - managed to secure a job at a big financial services firm in London. The job itself was far from amazing - £18k pa, and I was basically the dealers/traders b*tch, answering their phones and getting shouted at. But at the time I was ecstatic to get a job, especially one related to the field I was interested in (finance)

    I applied 110% effort every single day, continued networking, and helped my colleagues/the company out beyond my job role as much as I could.


    Now, 2 years later, I'm 24 years old, still with the same company, except I'm now an Analyst earning £32k pa (basic) working in the City.

    All the people I work with are graduates, pHDs etc - ok, top grads probably get into these kind of roles straight away, whereas it's taken me an extra 2 years' of grind. But I'm there now - and it all started with that initial non-ideal job


    So, my advice would be - find the field you're interested in, get the best entry-level (with prospects) job you can find, slog your guts out for a long a it takes, impress as many people as you can, and go from there. Of course you need luck etc. along the way, but that's the same for anything in life!

    Good luck
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    (Original post by jamesmiguel)
    With all due respect to the OP, I agree with what most posters have said - you need to perhaps set your (initial) sights lower. This doesn't mean necessarily accepting a life of drudgery, but rather just working harder to get through the ranks.

    I'll give myself as a good example -

    Graduated in 2010 with a 2:2 in Law from a redbrick uni (no excuse for the degree classification, sadly just didn't work hard enough.) Went travelling for 3 months, then came back expecting to roll into a high-paying grad job - didn't happen, of course.

    But, rather than getting despondent, I networked to the max. and - after 2 months of job-hunting - managed to secure a job at a big financial services firm in London. The job itself was far from amazing - £18k pa, and I was basically the dealers/traders b*tch, answering their phones and getting shouted at. But at the time I was ecstatic to get a job, especially one related to the field I was interested in (finance)

    I applied 110% effort every single day, continued networking, and helped my colleagues/the company out beyond my job role as much as I could.


    Now, 2 years later, I'm 24 years old, still with the same company, except I'm now an Analyst earning £32k pa (basic) working in the City.

    All the people I work with are graduates, pHDs etc - ok, top grads probably get into these kind of roles straight away, whereas it's taken me an extra 2 years' of grind. But I'm there now - and it all started with that initial non-ideal job


    So, my advice would be - find the field you're interested in, get the best entry-level (with prospects) job you can find, slog your guts out for a long a it takes, impress as many people as you can, and go from there. Of course you need luck etc. along the way, but that's the same for anything in life!

    Good luck
    i'm in the same boat as u were but i'm not into networking (science grad lame socially). Still unemployed :eek: What is the name of your firm? pm me if u dont want to pos here. I will chek them out and hopefully apply if any roles are available. Cheers
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    i'm in the same boat as u were but i'm not into networking (science grad lame socially). Still unemployed :eek: What is the name of your firm? pm me if u dont want to pos here. I will chek them out and hopefully apply if any roles are available. Cheers
    We've had a hiring freeze since the beginning of the year unfortunately, however feel free to pm me with your cv/background, and I'll try to give you some tips (I'm no expert by any means, but happy to help out where I can )

    I'd recommend sending your cv out to recruiter Michael Page, and also reed.co.uk if you haven't already
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    If you have a degree that doesn't mean they will pay you high salary. Every job is a job and your ignorant attitude towards low paid jobs is pathetic. So, you prefer being unemployed instead of having at least low paid job while trying to get through and move on? Money is money, it doesn't matter where they come from as long as it is money. Also, who knows, if you work good and you show that you're a good employee, you might be promoted.

    My colleague has the same degree as me (Business Admin with Translation) and she started as a room attendant, worked hard and now she's a supervisor at the same workplace.
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    who is michael page? HR guy at your company?

    In terms of skills pretty solid. 4A's at alevel inc maths, further maths, physics and geog, spent a year at oxford doing maths before dropping out and completing a geophysics degree at ucl. I've been on a solo round the world trip, worked in retail, telesales, a few data admin places, experience as an analyst at loreal, and selftaught vba excel programmer, which i used to good effect at loreal.

    I think people just won't employ me because i'm working class and my dad is a carpenter and i'm from a really poor background. That's the only thing i can think of. It's not like i have a personality defect - i'm a really nice, down to earth, friendly and hard working person - much more so than your average finance person.
    Oh sorry no I meant http://www.michaelpage.co.uk/

    From what you've said it sounds like you'd be a pretty decent candidate for a lot of jobs (not just finance) I can't really comment about other industries, but in financial services I honestly don't think it would matter if you were "working class"; one of the really good thing about the world of financial services (know it gets a fair bit of bad press ) is that it's more or less a meritocracy - the only real thing that matters is how good you are.

    Ok that's a bit idealistic, and yes of course it would help going to Eton etc. but (speaking personally) my colleagues, bosses, clients are from all sorts of backgrounds - some went to a top private school then Oxford, many others are solid middle-class and went to Oxbridge/top redbrick.

    Yet many others came from pretty poor backgrounds, fought their way into top unis, and are really good at what they do - and, if anything, they can sometimes get more respect from employers, as they often come across as hungrier and more ambitious.


    What kind of jobs have you been applying for? One thing I would warn about finance though is you have to be passionate about it. People either love hedge funds, derivatives, interest rate swaps; or they hate it/find it uninteresting - if you're in the latter category, then financial services probably isn't for you.

    (Of course, "finance" is a huge field - it covers everything from vanilla day-to-day retail banking at a bank branch, to being a highly-paid chartered accountant at PWC or E&Y, to exotic ETF trading desks at a firm like Goldman Sachs, so there's a lot of stuff to choose from!)
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    (Original post by jamesmiguel)
    What kind of jobs have you been applying for? One thing I would warn about finance though is you have to be passionate about it. People either love hedge funds, derivatives, interest rate swaps; or they hate it/find it uninteresting - if you're in the latter category, then financial services probably isn't for you.

    (Of course, "finance" is a huge field - it covers everything from vanilla day-to-day retail banking at a bank branch, to being a highly-paid chartered accountant at PWC or E&Y, to exotic ETF trading desks at a firm like Goldman Sachs, so there's a lot of stuff to choose from!)
    the only thing in finance sector i find remotely interesting is catastrophe modelling; i got into final round of a few companies but failed at the last hurdle on both.

    I have applied for actuarial, banking internships and indeed grad schemes, but because i've never experienced this before, I really don't know what to expect and don't really have much enthusiasm for it, probably because i've no idea what the work would involve, so that probably brushes off in my application and I get a generic rejection. My dream job is to work in the oil and gas sector or as a catastrophe modeller. Preferably the former, but having trouble getting work experience. with a bit of RMS experience i'd breeze it i think, but no one is giving me the opportunity to even let me work for them for free!
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    1) I didnt say I am expecting a "fat" manager's wage.

    2) Like I said before, I am not saying "because I got a degree I should be given a job" - the fact is on experience.

    3) I didnt say I dont have experience I have SOME but not vast amounts. It is from self employment (for the last 4-5 years).

    Employers dont want to take someone on who has graduated. They take someone on who didnt even go uni and worked in the field for the last 5-7years full on.

    I recently applied for a job, it had 3 vacancies for the same role. I got a rejection email and they said "we had our 80 applicants and cannot offer feedback as to why your application wasn't successful".

    Now from experience there are at least 60+ apps for each job. Now what I am thinking is, its not due to my side having lack of experience or whatever, but if you think from an employers point of view:

    1) It is all online and they can see how many applications they got without physically counting them as to 1990s!

    2) Once they found 10 or 12 or whatever their short listing number is they would not even bother going through the rest 50+ apps!!!

    I might be wrong in thinking that but I MAY well be right!
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    got my first permanent job since graduating in june 2010! 6 month contract which may lead to permanent contract on successful completion of the 6 month contract
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    got my first permanent job since graduating in june 2010! 6 month contract which may lead to permanent contract on successful completion of the 6 month contract
    Hate to be the pedant but isn't 6 month fixed term with option still a temporary contract?

    Regardless- congrats.


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    (Original post by StuckInCoventry)
    He isn't being snobbish.. just unrealistic (due to no fault of his own). Todays economy is designed to demand youth become highly efficient, low paid robots to slave away for companies making giant profits, controlled and owned by the elite. Our society epitomises serfdom. The rich get richer, the poor well they'll stave. To some extent, it might have always been this way, but now the contrast is greater than ever and the gap is only growing.
    Nailed it.
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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    Hate to be the pedant but isn't 6 month fixed term with option still a temporary contract?

    Regardless- congrats.


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    can't find the contract to read the small print but the impression the people gave me at the interview was it was more a 6 month probation which was standard procedure, and basically if i didn't mess up big time I'd get a perm contract...but I guess technically you're right :eek:

    Spoiler:
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    I have a hedge fund interview tomorrow. If I get that i'll take that as the salary is 32k+ [12k a year more than this contract job I got]
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    can't find the contract to read the small print but the impression the people gave me at the interview was it was more a 6 month probation which was standard procedure, and basically if i didn't mess up big time I'd get a perm contract...but I guess technically you're right :eek:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    I have a hedge fund interview tomorrow. If I get that i'll take that as the salary is 32k+ [12k a year more than this contract job I got]
    Haha well bloody good luck for tomorrow!


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    Out of interest what university did you go to and what grade did you achieve?

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    (Original post by Uni=RipOff)
    2) Once they found 10 or 12 or whatever their short listing number is they would not even bother going through the rest 50+ apps!!!

    I might be wrong in thinking that but I MAY well be right!

    Firstly, you're assuming they found 12 candidates to shortlist within their first 15 applications - this is not the case.

    Secondly, most companies - promoting equal opportunities anyway - will wait until the job is closed and then look at the applications, much like most universities. This is so everyone is given a fair shot at getting the job.

    Lastly, why would you stop at 12 and not look at the next 50 applications when there is every chance they'll find someone that will 'wow' them in the next application. This and the fact that most companies have a people bank where they can save CVs/applications from attractive candidates and if need be, pull them up later on down the line e.g. if someone starts, doesn't like it and leaves.

    You sound so bitter at not being able to get a job, it's unreal. Whenever you get a rejection - keep pestering for constructive feedback and change your approach. You'll be much more successful this way. Of course companies want to employ graduates - the vast amount of reputable organisations that invest heavily in Graduate Schemes backs this up. Keep trying. Good luck.
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    (Original post by Uni=RipOff)
    [...] Employers dont want to take someone on who has graduated. They take someone on who didnt even go uni and worked in the field for the last 5-7years full on. [...]
    While I do not know the ins and outs of your field, surely you should be applying for graduate roles with local councils, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), or the Environment Agency? These sorts of jobs require specialist knowledge which cannot be obtained unless you have a degree, making the experience issue largely irrelevant.

    I had a look on my local council website and found this job. It explicitly asks for degree-level education 'and knowledge of the Cleaner Neighbourhoods Act 200 and legislation relating to Waste Management, Litter, Fly tipping, Graffiti, Abandoned cars and Dog Fouling'. This sort of thing matches your degree knowledge, right?
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    (Original post by jamesmiguel)
    With all due respect to the OP, I agree with what most posters have said - you need to perhaps set your (initial) sights lower. This doesn't mean necessarily accepting a life of drudgery, but rather just working harder to get through the ranks.

    I'll give myself as a good example -

    Graduated in 2010 with a 2:2 in Law from a redbrick uni (no excuse for the degree classification, sadly just didn't work hard enough.) Went travelling for 3 months, then came back expecting to roll into a high-paying grad job - didn't happen, of course.

    But, rather than getting despondent, I networked to the max. and - after 2 months of job-hunting - managed to secure a job at a big financial services firm in London. The job itself was far from amazing - £18k pa, and I was basically the dealers/traders b*tch, answering their phones and getting shouted at. But at the time I was ecstatic to get a job, especially one related to the field I was interested in (finance)

    I applied 110% effort every single day, continued networking, and helped my colleagues/the company out beyond my job role as much as I could.


    Now, 2 years later, I'm 24 years old, still with the same company, except I'm now an Analyst earning £32k pa (basic) working in the City.

    All the people I work with are graduates, pHDs etc - ok, top grads probably get into these kind of roles straight away, whereas it's taken me an extra 2 years' of grind. But I'm there now - and it all started with that initial non-ideal job


    So, my advice would be - find the field you're interested in, get the best entry-level (with prospects) job you can find, slog your guts out for a long a it takes, impress as many people as you can, and go from there. Of course you need luck etc. along the way, but that's the same for anything in life!

    Good luck
    Excellent post similar to my situation started with not such a great job and now working my way up.

    What I will say to OP

    Do not be so fixed on graduate schemes. I tried so hard went to a redbrick uni studied Accounting and finance, achieved a 2:1 but did not get a graduate scheme. Instead I also applied to non-graduate scheme jobs improving and tailoring my application. My first job after uni was not so great dealing with insurance claims highly target driven.

    1 year 9 months working for a major bank with people that have over 5 years work experience and guess what looking to work my way up to my perfect role through networking and some luck.

    You have to keep applying and not give up I got rejections but that just made me more eager.

    Do not surround yourself with negative people

    Keep busy and research know what is going on so when you have interviews for instance in the financial services industry they might ask about the economy etc
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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    Haha well bloody good luck for tomorrow!


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    i got rejected from the job cos "i was too chilled out" and didnt show motivation lol! data entry it is


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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    i got rejected from the job cos "i was too chilled out" and didnt show motivation lol! data entry it is


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    Sorry to hear that, but again, you need to look at it constructively - you got to the final round for a £32k hedge fund job (that's basically my role and I've been working for 2+ yrs.) So there must've been a lot they liked about you - did they specify where exactly you didn't show sufficient enthusiasm?

    I know from experience that these hedgies love people who can come into an interview and know a ton about the industry - maybe you should get researching derivatives, options, futures, shorting etc. and then re-apply for a similar role?
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    (Original post by jamesmiguel)
    Sorry to hear that, but again, you need to look at it constructively - you got to the final round for a £32k hedge fund job (that's basically my role and I've been working for 2+ yrs.) So there must've been a lot they liked about you - did they specify where exactly you didn't show sufficient enthusiasm?

    I know from experience that these hedgies love people who can come into an interview and know a ton about the industry - maybe you should get researching derivatives, options, futures, shorting etc. and then re-apply for a similar role?
    tbh, i'm was just looking for a job that will allow me to save up enough uni to do a masters or some kind of advanced geophysics qualification. My dream is to become an exploration geophysicist, not a hedge fund manager. I got a data entry job which i'm going to do for the next 6 months at least. Boring but it'll allow me to save 10kish towards uni. I'm hoping it'll lead to something better.
 
 
 
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