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    This is something I've always been wondering and I'd appreciate it if someone could tell me which areas in Computer Science have the best paid jobs. I'm currently a Y1 student and will have to pick optional modules in Y2. If I know doing a module will potentially get me a lot of money in the future I'd be really tempted to choose it.

    Anyway my optional modules next year is
    1.
    A) Programming III
    B) Mobile Programming

    2.
    A) Web App Development
    B) Advance Database

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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    The difference between them will probably make such an insignificant difference to your earning potential you might as well pick the ones you find more interesting.

    Both mobile and web programming (or more often, both together) have the potential to make a lot of money.
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    Personally I'd go with what you enjoy doing and what interests you. If you do that you're likely to enjoy your work meaning you do well at it. If you go for something because the pay will be good you could end up hating your job which could lead to you not doing as well.
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    Thanks for the response guys. If I'm honest I'm more interested in doing Mobile Programming and Web Designing anyway
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    Dude, you'll take modules on mobile/web development and that's what your heart wants! That is great. Remember, you can always self-teach yourself new technologies + if you'll work with great people, learning process will be even more flawless and enjoyable. Remember that mobile development is hard: competition is huge, there are many 1$ apps and most of them sucks. Due to the big part of market of $1 apps, your great app may need more than being great. Being featured in the market as well as ads campaigns are needed. In the past it was not the case. Just a thought.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    The difference between them will probably make such an insignificant difference to your earning potential you might as well pick the ones you find more interesting.

    Both mobile and web programming (or more often, both together) have the potential to make a lot of money.
    I've to agree; mobile <so and so> is the "it" thing now.
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    The highest earning CompSci sector is probably in financial trading software. Doesn't really pertain to your module choices though.
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    If you can create an nice, clean app in a niche market then you're in the money if you can sell it to a corporate giant.
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    (Original post by mos182)
    Thanks for the response guys. If I'm honest I'm more interested in doing Mobile Programming and Web Designing anyway
    What do you think is Web Design exactly? Your almost referring to it as if its Web Development when Web Design roles are primarily static visual design with some roles requiring HTML and CSS (but most not even that unfortunately).

    It’s very rare to come across a development & design role. This is what I was looking for but many companies want you to specialise as a back-end developer, front-end developer or web designer.

    In general web development professions are in demand so you should not have trouble getting a job once you developed a phew projects that you can demonstrate to potential employers. In contrast web design roles will often be harder to find because graphic design grads will often fill up these roles when they find it hard to find print design jobs even though web design and print design are two completely different things.

    Society doesnt values designers as much as developers in general so salary is a lot lower too. It's unfortunate but something I've come to realise.
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    Did you consider freelancing doing web design? I know it's a lot harder but you add experience, earn a name and a great living. I mean over time you will work whenever you want, how much you want and there are loads of jobs out there on the Internet and if you have a circle of friends, you may even be provided with work. Think about this.
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    (Original post by Valentas)
    Did you consider freelancing doing web design? I know it's a lot harder but you add experience, earn a name and a great living. I mean over time you will work whenever you want, how much you want and there are loads of jobs out there on the Internet and if you have a circle of friends, you may even be provided with work. Think about this.
    Not sure if this is directed at me but if so...

    There are lots of advantages and disadvantages with freelancing which I wont get into here. As a grad I figured that it would be better to do freelancing once youve built up a number of contacts from companies youve previously worked for. A number of contractors did this in the firm I worked on placement for and I figured this is a pretty good way to get a solid list of clients because they will know how you work seeing as they were your past employer. So if I do eventually go freelance it will be after a number of years working under a permanent position in multiple firms.

    As for getting work from the Internet, I dont like this approach because people end up in bidding wars with other freelancers.

    Even though I had 1 year experience working in a fast paced digital agency as a grad I still want to work on a permanent basis under another digital agency just to make sure my work is solid. A year is not enough to get you up to par which is why I looked for a permanent position. I have a grad job under a big digital agency now which I am happy with.
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    (Original post by mos182)
    This is something I've always been wondering and I'd appreciate it if someone could tell me which areas in Computer Science have the best paid jobs. I'm currently a Y1 student and will have to pick optional modules in Y2. If I know doing a module will potentially get me a lot of money in the future I'd be really tempted to choose it.

    Anyway my optional modules next year is
    1.
    A) Programming III
    B) Mobile Programming

    2.
    A) Web Designing
    B) Advance Database

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    If you really want to make money, get yourself an internship/year in industry with one of the big boys. To do that smash your exams this summer and get on with applying.

    Plenty of people graduating from my year this year with jobs sewn up well above 35k straight from uni because they had a YINI with one of the banks, worked hard and got a job offer!

    So thats the key to big money I would say rather than what modules you pick!
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    (Original post by rjm101)
    What do you think is Web Design exactly? Your almost referring to it as if its Web Development when Web Design roles are primarily static visual design with some roles requiring HTML and CSS (but most not even that unfortunately)
    Sorry I meant Web Development. I'm nearly certain module is actually called Web App Development and my OP is a typo
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    (Original post by mos182)
    Sorry I meant Web Development. I'm nearly certain module is actually called Web App Development and my OP is a typo
    No worries. Do you have a placement year in your degree? If not I highly recommend you do summer internships between each year. It will really help you out with job prospects (and salary) when you graduate. It will make the difference between starting from 18k when you graduate to 25k+. This is coming from personnel experience of course. 18k seems to be the base salary here for web developers if you have no commercial experience but you may even have to do a 3 month internship to even start on that. This is why I'm stressing that you do an internship inbetween your uni years. Its easier to get an internship whilst your still a student too.
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    Got a year in the industry which is my 3rd year, so will be applying for placement at the start of year 2. We've already had to do up a draft CV this year in preparation for the start of next year.

    I've been offered the chance to do some programming (PHP) at www.mmatycoon.com and while he did say he wouldn't be able to pay me, he's offered me free VIP which is worth a bit of money and means I won't have to pay for renewal of my current VIP membership.

    I've had a bit of experience with PHP so far in my Introduction to Databases module and getting this chance will hopefully look good on my CV if I develop something. Obviously it depends on how I get on.

    Just there tonight, I seen that someone needed a Java programmer for developing a minecraft plugin, I replied stating that I was a 1st year uni student (like a did with MMA Tycoon) and he's offering me $30 if I can complete the plugin. Will give me a chance to improve my programming skills with Java so I think I should take it.

    Will both of these look good on my CV? That is if I manage to successfully develop something and that it won't be a massive failure
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    (Original post by mos182)
    Got a year in the industry which is my 3rd year, so will be applying for placement at the start of year 2. We've already had to do up a draft CV this year in preparation for the start of next year.

    I've been offered the chance to do some programming (PHP) at www.mmatycoon.com and while he did say he wouldn't be able to pay me, he's offered me free VIP which is worth a bit of money and means I won't have to pay for renewal of my current VIP membership.

    I've had a bit of experience with PHP so far in my Introduction to Databases module and getting this chance will hopefully look good on my CV if I develop something. Obviously it depends on how I get on.

    Just there tonight, I seen that someone needed a Java programmer for developing a minecraft plugin, I replied stating that I was a 1st year uni student (like a did with MMA Tycoon) and he's offering me $30 if I can complete the plugin. Will give me a chance to improve my programming skills with Java so I think I should take it.

    Will both of these look good on my CV? That is if I manage to successfully develop something and that it won't be a massive failure
    Most important thing is to get a portfolio together they will only glance at your CV. Even though you may not be going for a design role its also important to make sure everything looks professional because design influences our decisions more than we like to think.

    Something is better than nothing, but ideally I would be looking at summer internships rather than odd jobs. I suggest you look at internships and placements only at digital agencies. I say this because you will learn a lot more because client work will be varied and the environment will be fast paced. In general, it will look better in your portfolio because your work will have variety too.

    There’s a reason why some big companies only want web design and/or developers from a digital agency background.
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    Go into networking, you'll make **** tonnes
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    (Original post by tkwan196)
    Go into networking, you'll make **** tonnes
    Why


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    (Original post by rjm101)
    Most important thing is to get a portfolio together they will only glance at your CV. Even though you may not be going for a design role its also important to make sure everything looks professional because design influences our decisions more than we like to think.

    Something is better than nothing, but ideally I would be looking at summer internships rather than odd jobs. I suggest you look at internships and placements only at digital agencies. I say this because you will learn a lot more because client work will be varied and the environment will be fast paced. In general, it will look better in your portfolio because your work will have variety too.

    There’s a reason why some big companies only want web design and/or developers from a digital agency background.
    Portfolio of things I've programmed?

    By digital agencies do you just mean IT companies?
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    (Original post by mos182)
    By digital agencies do you just mean IT companies?
    Digital agencies are companies that provide outsourced design/development expertise to other companies, as opposed to in-house software teams (i.e. a company that develops its own software/website in-house).

    In general, this means that developers will have to be much more adaptable as they can't simply learn a single system inside-out.

    It also means being able to work to tight deadlines as these will be either imposed by a third party (the client) or imposed by the company's own quoted timescales, meaning project overruns amount to direct loss of profit, while overruns for an in-house development team are usually just an inconvenience.

    Further, working for a digital agency will mean the quality of your work is under more scrutiny as your superiors will likely have a better understanding of it at a technical level.

    Obviously, succeeding in these circumstances is a strong indicator of your ability - future employers will know that you haven't been coasting.

    To be honest, your industrial experience will eclipse any choices of module. Once you have a year or two of professional software development experience, your intuition, problem-solving and knowledge gained on the job (and, more importantly, being able to expand that knowledgebase quickly) will be all that matter and the details of your degree will be more or less completely irrelevant.
 
 
 
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