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    (extracted from http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3511678.stm )

    Astronomers have detected what could be the Solar System's 10th planet.
    It was first seen by astronomers using California's Mount Palomar Observatory, and has been given the name "Sedna" after the Inuit goddess of the ocean.

    Observations show it measures about 1,180-2,360km (730-1,470 miles) across, making it similar in size to Pluto.

    There is likely to be some debate about whether it qualifies as a true planet, but some scientists are already saying it re-defines our Solar System.

    Further than Pluto

    Sedna, or 2003 VB16, as it was originally designated, is the most distant object yet found orbiting our Sun. It is three times further away than Pluto (average distance to the Sun is 5.9 billion km or 3.6 billion miles).

    It was discovered using the Mt Palomar facility in November by astronomers from the California Institute of Technology, Yale Observatory and the Gemini Observatory.

    Follow-up studies by the Tanagra Observatory have measured the thermal radiation coming from Sedna to determine how hot it is, and therefore provide some estimate of its size.

    This estimate is uncertain but the object is likely to be between half the diameter of Pluto (2,360km or 1,470 miles) and Pluto's size; though some astronomers think it could be larger than the ninth planet itself.

    From the observations made so far, astronomers have determined Sedna's orbit to be a very large one.

    It is currently 90 times the Earth-Sun distance away (149 million km or 93 million miles), but its orbit can take it 10 times further away still.

    Small worlds

    Although Sedna could be a so-called Kuiper Belt object, its discoverers are unsure if it is as they consider it to be unlike any other object yet found.

    The KB contains hundreds of known objects and astronomers believe there are many more awaiting discovery. Most are small worlds of rock and ice but some could rival Pluto in size.


    And only in February this year, scientists picked up the object 2004 DW, which is though to be 1,800km (1,120 miles) across.

    The importance of Sedna is that it could be the first such world discovered in its normal orbit. Other similar though smaller worlds, like Quaoar and Varuna, originated in the KB but have since been perturbed into different orbits.

    More follow-up observations are being carried out by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gemini Observatory.

    Is it a planet?

    The new discovery will reignite the debate about what constitutes a planet.

    One group of astronomers believe that Pluto is not a true planet but merely one of the largest of a vast number of minor objects in the outer Solar System.

    The alternative standpoint is that Pluto is a planet and those who believe that will have to classify Sedna as the 10th planet.

    The name Sedna has been provided by its discoverers.

    However, if its planetary status is confirmed, it may be that astronomy's governing body, the International Astronomical Union, will want to reconsider this, to make it more consistent with the mythological names of other planets.




    what does everyone think about this? Will all the science text book change? Is this a big discovery?
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    (extracted from http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3511678.stm )

    Astronomers have detected what could be the Solar System's 10th planet...

    what does everyone think about this? Will all the science text book change? Is this a big discovery?
    Why copy and paste the whole damn thing here? You should give a link to the original where you got the information from and then paraphrase it. Alternatively, you kan give an overview of what the article entails, then give opinions and give link. There is no point in doing a copy and paste job.
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    (extracted from http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3511678.stm )
    Technically, extracted is not the right term as it means that you have taken an exerpt from an article, which you have not.

    sorry, im just hungry at the mo.
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    Wow! Another lump of rock so far out that its totally irrelivent to our lives!
    But why rename it? Why do even the International Astronomical Union have to be so rooted in the past?
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    stop complaining! i was give you 2 options you should thank me
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    This new chunk of junk is about as much a planet as Pluto. It has as much significance as any other large asteroid that is too far away to see without hubble.
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    oh oh oh!! i saw about this on the news this morning, its very exciting
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    (Original post by ~*glitter*~)
    oh oh oh!! i saw about this on the news this morning, its very exciting
    if pluto is in the text books, surely sedna will be>
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    They arent 100% sure about it yet.
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    if pluto is in the text books, surely sedna will be>
    But Pluto shouldn't be. Its only a planet because someone once called it that and its too much work to change now. The same goes if theyfind a new planet. It is too much work to make everything prior to the discovery obsolete.
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    (Original post by pal_sch)
    But Pluto shouldn't be. Its only a planet because someone once called it that and its too much work to change now. The same goes if theyfind a new planet. It is too much work to make everything prior to the discovery obsolete.
    why should pluto not be a planet? Is it just an asteroid or something?
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    I think its great 'another planet' some scientists don't believe it is though.
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    (Original post by rednirt)
    why should pluto not be a planet? Is it just an asteroid or something?
    Most scientists now think it is the largest (not by much) K belt object. This makes it a oversized asteroid. If it was closer to Uranus it could be clasified as a possible escaped moon.
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    There are nine planets in the solar system.
    As if a newly discovered planet's going to matter to my teacher.
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    (Original post by piggysqueak)
    There are nine planets in the solar system.
    As if a newly discovered planet's going to matter to my teacher.
    what the hell?
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    (Original post by ]{ingnik)
    what the hell?
    Sample conversation to explain
    Teacher:light travels in straight lines
    Me: I heard that it is bent by gravity like in black holes
    Teacher :light travels in straight lines
    Me:But..?
    Tacher: Light travels in stright lines. Everyone ignore her.

    See?
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    (Original post by piggysqueak)
    Sample conversation to explain
    Teacher:light travels in straight lines
    Me: I heard that it is bent by gravity like in black holes
    Teacher :light travels in straight lines
    Me:But..?
    Tacher: Light travels in stright lines. Everyone ignore her.

    See?
    i bet your teacher really hates you. you're one of the ones who knows things. i feel your pain.
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    Light does travel in straight lines. When we see it curved by gravity, it is the curvature of space and ourselves, not of light. The light is always travelling along the path of least resistance, which is a striaght line.
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    (Original post by ]{ingnik)
    what the hell?
    There is a debate as to whether Sedna is actually a planet or just another rock orbiting outside Neptune's orbit. Neptune orbits at 33 times the orbital radius of Earth I think, and the usual radius of these rocks is between 40 and 80 times that of the Earth - a long way away. But Sedna's maximum distance in its orbit is about 900 times that. The question is, how on earth (on Earth?) did it get so far out?

    (Original post by TheWolf)
    (extracted from http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3511678.stm )

    Astronomers have detected what could be the Solar System's 10th planet.
    It was first seen by astronomers using California's Mount Palomar Observatory, and has been given the name "Sedna" after the Inuit goddess of the ocean.

    Observations show it measures about 1,180-2,360km (730-1,470 miles) across, making it similar in size to Pluto.

    There is likely to be some debate about whether it qualifies as a true planet, but some scientists are already saying it re-defines our Solar System.

    Further than Pluto

    Sedna, or 2003 VB16, as it was originally designated, is the most distant object yet found orbiting our Sun. It is three times further away than Pluto (average distance to the Sun is 5.9 billion km or 3.6 billion miles).

    It was discovered using the Mt Palomar facility in November by astronomers from the California Institute of Technology, Yale Observatory and the Gemini Observatory.

    Follow-up studies by the Tanagra Observatory have measured the thermal radiation coming from Sedna to determine how hot it is, and therefore provide some estimate of its size.

    This estimate is uncertain but the object is likely to be between half the diameter of Pluto (2,360km or 1,470 miles) and Pluto's size; though some astronomers think it could be larger than the ninth planet itself.

    From the observations made so far, astronomers have determined Sedna's orbit to be a very large one.

    It is currently 90 times the Earth-Sun distance away (149 million km or 93 million miles), but its orbit can take it 10 times further away still.

    Small worlds

    Although Sedna could be a so-called Kuiper Belt object, its discoverers are unsure if it is as they consider it to be unlike any other object yet found.

    The KB contains hundreds of known objects and astronomers believe there are many more awaiting discovery. Most are small worlds of rock and ice but some could rival Pluto in size.


    And only in February this year, scientists picked up the object 2004 DW, which is though to be 1,800km (1,120 miles) across.

    The importance of Sedna is that it could be the first such world discovered in its normal orbit. Other similar though smaller worlds, like Quaoar and Varuna, originated in the KB but have since been perturbed into different orbits.

    More follow-up observations are being carried out by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gemini Observatory.

    Is it a planet?

    The new discovery will reignite the debate about what constitutes a planet.

    One group of astronomers believe that Pluto is not a true planet but merely one of the largest of a vast number of minor objects in the outer Solar System.

    The alternative standpoint is that Pluto is a planet and those who believe that will have to classify Sedna as the 10th planet.

    The name Sedna has been provided by its discoverers.

    However, if its planetary status is confirmed, it may be that astronomy's governing body, the International Astronomical Union, will want to reconsider this, to make it more consistent with the mythological names of other planets.




    what does everyone think about this? Will all the science text book change? Is this a big discovery?
    I think i have upheld this discussion quite sometime before!
 
 
 
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