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    perhaps someone can help me with this

    1.
    Benzoicacid and phenylmethanol will react with each other in the presence of asuitable catalyst.
    (i)Statea suitable catalyst for this reaction.
    ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................
    [1]
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    (Original post by Zzzyax)
    perhaps someone can help me with this

    1.
    Benzoicacid and phenylmethanol will react with each other in the presence of asuitable catalyst.
    (i)Statea suitable catalyst for this reaction.
    ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................
    [1]
    concentrated H2SO4?
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    concentrated H2SO4?
    :nope: dilute H2SO4
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    (Original post by Plato's Trousers)
    :nope: dilute H2SO4
    Really, in our book its always concentrated! why is it dilute
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    (Original post by Plato's Trousers)
    :nope: dilute H2SO4
    My teacher and book tell me that it is concentrated :confused:
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    (Original post by Plato's Trousers)
    :nope: dilute H2SO4
    Dr Stuart, why is ClCH2CH2CL

    only have a singlet , Should it not be pentet?
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Really, in our book its always concentrated! why is it dilute
    (Original post by Jodie_668)
    My teacher and book tell me that it is concentrated :confused:
    (Original post by Plato's Trousers)
    :nope: dilute H2SO4
    To form an ester from an acid and alcohol it is most definitely catalysed by conc sulfuric acid. This is because this is a reversible reaction and you can hydrolyse the ester by using a dilut acid, hence why a conc acid is used to favour the forward reaction: esterification

    Hope this clears things up.
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Dr Stuart, why is ClCH2CH2CL

    only have a singlet , Should it not be pentet?
    If you dont mind me answering, I wanna test my understanding. The protons in the molecule are all in the same proton environment, hence there are no neighbouring 'different'
    Protons. so therefore using the n+1 rule, 0+1= 1 so it is a singlet
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    (Original post by ZakRob)
    If you dont mind me answering, I wanna test my understanding. The protons in the molecule are all in the same proton environment, hence there are no neighbouring 'different'
    Protons. so therefore using the n+1 rule, 0+1= 1 so it is a singlet
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    Correct!
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    (Original post by ZakRob)
    To form an ester from an acid and alcohol it is most definitely catalysed by conc sulfuric acid. This is because this is a reversible reaction and you can hydrolyse the ester by using a dilut acid, hence why a conc acid is used to favour the forward reaction: esterification

    Hope this clears things up.
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    Thanks!
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    Is there a mistake on question 6 on page 105 , compound E, there has to be 1 triplet as well because CH2 is present so if you add one , there should be 3?
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    Does anybody by any chance have a copy of the January 2013 F324 question paper and mark scheme?
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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Thanks, also just going to warn you now, at 9 I'll be stopping to do some unit 1 revision. But that's 45 minutes from now so it's all good

    It's question 7 (4)


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    You got the question
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Is there a mistake on question 6 on page 105 , compound E, there has to be 1 triplet as well because CH2 is present so if you add one , there should be 3?
    This is to answer your question.

    The problems with kekules structure are that it failed to explain the chemical and physical properties of benzene fully. Mainly being benzene's low reactivity because if carbon carbon double bonds were present then it would react in a similar way to alkenes mainly expecting to decolourise when reacting with bromine water. But this doesn't happen. So the structure had to be refined to account for this property.


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    This is to answer your question.

    The problems with kekules structure are that it failed to explain the chemical and physical properties of benzene fully. Mainly being benzene's low reactivity because if carbon carbon double bonds were present then it would react in a similar way to alkenes mainly expecting to decolourise when reacting with bromine water. But this doesn't happen. So the structure had to be refined to account for this property.


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    2/3 marks, last point should have been that the enthalpy change of hydrognation of benzene is less exothermic than that of Kekule. My turn
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    2/3 marks, last point should have been that the enthalpy change of hydrognation of benzene is less exothermic than that of Kekule. My turn
    Oh okay, my bad, I'll remember to write that aswell although it seems like quite a lot to write for 3 marks.

    For you, when would you use D2O and what is it used to identify? (2)


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Oh okay, my bad, I'll remember to write that aswell although it seems like quite a lot to write for 3 marks.

    For you, when would you use D2O and what is it used to identify? (2)


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    D2O is a deuterating solvent and is an isotope of hydrogen. It is used in NMR spectrums. You would use D2O if there are any OH and NH groups present and it is used so that it does not show up in the NMR spectrum of both carbon and proton as the OH and NH have no splitting patterns and have a wide range and broad range of different chemical shifts depending on concentration and solvent used of D2O. It results in proton exchange in which the hydrogen gets replaced in OH and NH.
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    D2O is a deuterating solvent and is an isotope of hydrogen. It is used in NMR spectrums. You would use D2O if there are any OH and NH groups present and it is used so that it does not show up in the NMR spectrum of both carbon and proton as the OH and NH have no splitting patterns and have a wide range and broad range of different chemical shifts depending on concentration and solvent used of D2O. It results in proton exchange in which the hydrogen gets replaced in OH and NH.
    That's correct!


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    That's correct!


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    Suggest why amino acids have isoelectric points (1)
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    seriously need the f324/f325 jan 2013 papers please someone upload!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
 
 
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