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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    - The c=c bonds in Kekule structure do not react the same way as in alkenes. It does not take part in electrophilic addition.
    - Kekule also suggested c=c and c-c bonds, however x-ray determined that all bonds had the same legths in bezene as apposed to dieferrent lengths from c=c and c-c bonds.
    - Kekules' structure is also less stable than the real benzene structure.

    yes correct!
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    yes correct!
    Define retention time.
    And briefly describe the steps in gas chromotography.
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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    Define retention time.
    And briefly describe the steps in gas chromotography.
    have not revised that yet
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    have not revised that yet
    Ok, explain why phenol can be brominated easier than Benzene. [3 marks]
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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    Ok, explain why phenol can be brominated easier than Benzene. [3 marks]
    Phenol has an OH group in which the oxygen has a lone pair of electron and is drawn into the ring. This creates a region of high electron density and as a result, the ring becomes activated. Because of this the bromine Br-Br bond becomes polarised easily and is attracted towards the ring because of the rich electron density.
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Phenol has an OH group in which the oxygen has a lone pair of electron and is drawn into the ring. This creates a region of high electron density and as a result, the ring becomes activated. Because of this the bromine Br-Br bond becomes polarised easily and is attracted towards the ring because of the rich electron density.
    Yes correct. Its alo kinda hard to revise this module because it involves a lot of looking/drawing molecules and analysing stuff.
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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    Yes correct. Its alo kinda hard to revise this module because it involves a lot of looking/drawing molecules and analysing stuff.
    Yes, but there are lots of definitions and describing in chapter 1!


    Define:carbon neutral

    Define:amphoteric
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Yes, but there are lots of definitions and describing in chapter 1!


    Define:carbon neutral

    Define:amphoteric

    Carbon neutral: something thats produces the same amount of carbon that it takes in.

    Amphoteric: A molecule which has the characteristics of both an acid and base.
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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    Carbon neutral: something thats produces the same amount of carbon that it takes in.

    Amphoteric: A molecule which has the characteristics of both an acid and base.
    first one, you wont get the mark if you say that in the exam, it should be that , its where a crop releases the same amount of co2 and the same amount of co2 is absorbed when combusted.

    second one is perfect!

    my turn give me challenging one
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    first one, you wont get the mark if you say that in the exam, it should be that , its where a crop releases the same amount of co2 and the same amount of co2 is absorbed when combusted.

    second one is perfect!

    my turn give me challenging one
    Okay.

    1,4-diaminobenzene can irrate the skin because it is basic. Therefore, it is sometimes neutralised with EXCESS HCL acid to give the salt.

    Explain how the amino groups in a primary amine such as the one I mentioned allow the molecule to act as a base. [2 Marks​]
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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    Okay.

    1,4-diaminobenzene can irrate the skin because it is basic. Therefore, it is sometimes neutralised with EXCESS HCL acid to give the salt.

    Explain how the amino groups in a primary amine such as the one I mentioned allow the molecule to act as a base. [2 Marks​]
    The nitrogen present in 1,4-diaminobenzene is a base and accepts a proton. Therefore, This results in both sides of -NH2- to form NH3 +
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    The nitrogen present in 1,4-diaminobenzene is a base and accepts a proton. Therefore, This results in both sides of -NH2- to form NH3 +
    Okay, correct. That wasn't hard enough.
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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    Okay, correct. That wasn't hard enough.
    was this meant to be hard?


    How do you make nitrous acid (3)
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    was this meant to be hard?


    How do you make nitrous acid (3)
    No, i couldn't find any.

    NaNO2 + HCl --> HNO2+ NaCl

    This will be last one for today, I'm sleeping.

    Explain why triglycerides are soluble in non-polar solvents ut not in water.
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    (Original post by MasterYi)
    No, i couldn't find any.

    NaNO2 + HCl --> HNO2+ NaCl

    This will be last one for today, I'm sleeping.

    Explain why triglycerides are soluble in non-polar solvents ut not in water.
    ok Yes, and also mention the reaction mixture takes place in in-situ


    Because triglycerides form long chains of carbon ,hydrogen and oxygen and therefore is not soluble in water. The reason for this is because there is no hydrogen bond formation between the triglyceride and water molecule due to triglyceride not containing any hydroxyl groups (-O-H-) and therefore not soluble.
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    ok Yes, and also mention the reaction mixture takes place in in-situ


    Because triglycerides form long chains of carbon ,hydrogen and oxygen and therefore is not soluble in water. The reason for this is because there is no hydrogen bond formation between the triglyceride and water molecule due to triglyceride not containing any hydroxyl groups (-O-H-) and therefore not soluble.
    But why is it soluble in non-polar solvents?

    Also, earlier you mentioned carbon neutral.. under which topic is that under in unit 4?
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    (Original post by master y)
    But why is it soluble in non-polar solvents?

    Also, earlier you mentioned carbon neutral.. under which topic is that under in unit 4?
    its on the page regarding esterfication,
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    its on the page regarding esterfication,
    hey want to revise?
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    (Original post by Zzzyax)
    hey want to revise?
    Sure But you forgot to mark my answer for the structure and bonding of Benzene
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    got a feeling its going to be a killer paper :/
 
 
 
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