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    I wanted to open a thread because i'm a student which wants to go into civil engineering and basically I wanted to know better about it, like if there is any civil engineers, graduates or anyone studying it in uni?

    I've always been into buildings, houses, how there built etc and i'm currently in 6form.

    To be honest whenever I read up about it I read different things so I wanted a better insight...
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    civil engineering is good. I am in my final year and have work experience in bridge engineering. Its good. Civil engineering is not really about house building.
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    Do you like physics and maths? Those are far more relevant to whether you would enjoy studying civil engineering than being interested in building houses. If you don't like physics and maths, have you considered entering the construction industry or architecture? Low spatial aptitude is a predictor for failure in engineering. I don't mean to put you off if you want to do civil engineering, I want you to be as sure as possible that you want to do this before you start.

    Civil engineering requires you to understand what is possible and what is legal and what the client needs, and to communicate with the client so that they understand as well. Civil engineering projects are often large, and require engineers to take project management roles or work in teams. Very few civil engineers have anything to do with building houses.
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    (Original post by fizzgig)
    Do you like physics and maths? Those are far more relevant to whether you would enjoy studying civil engineering than being interested in building houses. If you don't like physics and maths, have you considered entering the construction industry or architecture? Low spatial aptitude is a predictor for failure in engineering. I don't mean to put you off if you want to do civil engineering, I want you to be as sure as possible that you want to do this before you start.

    Civil engineering requires you to understand what is possible and what is legal and what the client needs, and to communicate with the client so that they understand as well. Civil engineering projects are often large, and require engineers to take project management roles or work in teams. Very few civil engineers have anything to do with building houses.
    Yes I enjoy maths but do you have to enjoy all of physics aswell? Because I thought it was mainly mechanics that was needed.

    By the way thanks for this post, honestly, because I need help on this.

    I do like architecture but I'm not good at drawing?

    Also are you studying civil engineering or work as one?

    Thanks (Y)


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    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    civil engineering is good. I am in my final year and have work experience in bridge engineering. Its good. Civil engineering is not really about house building.
    What sort of things do you do in uni ad what uni do you go to, also what subjects did you do and if you don't mind is it ok if you tell me your grades

    Haha sorry about all the questions I just really want to know more....


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    (Original post by h1m94)
    Yes I enjoy maths but do you have to enjoy all of physics aswell? Because I thought it was mainly mechanics that was needed.

    By the way thanks for this post, honestly, because I need help on this.

    I do like architecture but I'm not good at drawing?

    Also are you studying civil engineering or work as one?

    Thanks (Y)


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    My father is a professor of civil engineering. He's been involved in researching what leads to people dropping out, changing out, or failing out of first year engineering. As a result, my comments might be a little harsh.

    You don't need to like all of physics. Relativity is unlikely to be useful, and the same goes for quantum. Mechanics, which fits into both physics and mathematics, is absolutely key so liking that is a definite bonus. You will probably need thermodynamics, and fluid dynamics. You might need to do some electronics work in your course, though I'm not sure if that's a universal requirement.

    In addition to the obvious building and bridge construction, civil engineers sometimes work on projects relating to off-shore rigs, mines, and infrastructure such as sewer systems, transport networks, and water distribution. Many will eventually leave technical roles in favor of the management and consultancy roles.

    Good luck in making your decisions!
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    (Original post by fizzgig)
    My father is a professor of civil engineering. He's been involved in researching what leads to people dropping out, changing out, or failing out of first year engineering. As a result, my comments might be a little harsh.

    You don't need to like all of physics. Relativity is unlikely to be useful, and the same goes for quantum. Mechanics, which fits into both physics and mathematics, is absolutely key so liking that is a definite bonus. You will probably need thermodynamics, and fluid dynamics. You might need to do some electronics work in your course, though I'm not sure if that's a universal requirement.

    In addition to the obvious building and bridge construction, civil engineers sometimes work on projects relating to off-shore rigs, mines, and infrastructure such as sewer systems, transport networks, and water distribution. Many will eventually leave technical roles in favor of the management and consultancy roles.

    Good luck in making your decisions!
    O right
    An no your comments aren't harsh because I'm asking for opinions...

    And I've seen that doing the civil engineering course in uni can lead to structural engineering jobs and construction etc
    Is civil engineering basically a managerial type of job (telling people what to do) because I wanted to so the uni course and get into a civil engineering company that pays graduate about 30,000, I got it bookmarked on my computer, it's in central London and begins with 'a'




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    (Original post by h1m94)
    O right
    An no your comments aren't harsh because I'm asking for opinions...

    And I've seen that doing the civil engineering course in uni can lead to structural engineering jobs and construction etc
    Is civil engineering basically a managerial type of job (telling people what to do) because I wanted to so the uni course and get into a civil engineering company that pays graduate about 30,000, I got it bookmarked on my computer, it's in central London and begins with 'a'




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    You do structural engineering at uni. The only job which is guaranteed to pay £30k+ is oil and gas. A consultant engineer will not get that. A contractor might get that if you include all the benefits.

    The average salary for a civil engineer is about £25-26k. There is no electronics in civil engineering. None.
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    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    You do structural engineering at uni. The only job which is guaranteed to pay £30k+ is oil and gas. A consultant engineer will not get that. A contractor might get that if you include all the benefits.

    The average salary for a civil engineer is about £25-26k. There is no electronics in civil engineering. None.
    That's only average for graduates and if you look at some other countries then you can double that, after a few years most engineers make considerably more. If you are a civil engineer, and you go for the right jobs in the right areas, you can make six figures easily after several years of experience. Consultants with extensive industry experience also attract much more.

    Electronics isn't a requirement for the job, but it is sometimes included in first year if a program wants to give students the option to change type of engineering between first and second. If it's a requirement of your course, then you should make sure you can at least be non-disastrous enough that it won't jeopardise your degree - there is a student in fourth year at my university who cannot pass the first year civil & structural they made a required part of the software engineering, and will probably have to switch to a non-engineering version of the degree or drop out if he doesn't manage to this year. It's more common in some countries than others.
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    (Original post by fizzgig)
    That's only average for graduates and if you look at some other countries then you can double that, after a few years most engineers make considerably more. If you are a civil engineer, and you go for the right jobs in the right areas, you can make six figures easily after several years of experience. Consultants with extensive industry experience also attract much more.

    Electronics isn't a requirement for the job, but it is sometimes included in first year if a program wants to give students the option to change type of engineering between first and second. If it's a requirement of your course, then you should make sure you can at least be non-disastrous enough that it won't jeopardise your degree - there is a student in fourth year at my university who cannot pass the first year civil & structural they made a required part of the software engineering, and will probably have to switch to a non-engineering version of the degree or drop out if he doesn't manage to this year. It's more common in some countries than others.
    Yes the starting salary is £25-26k, it will rise but do not think you will get £100k+ with ease, only middle management will get that salary in the UK. Going down the civil engineering route, you will not become "rich".

    Yes some university have general engineering, then you specialise, seems pointless to me if you want to become a civil engineer.
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    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    Yes the starting salary is £25-26k, it will rise but do not think you will get £100k+ with ease, only middle management will get that salary in the UK. Going down the civil engineering route, you will not become "rich".

    Yes some university have general engineering, then you specialise, seems pointless to me if you want to become a civil engineer.
    How about computer science jobs, I've read they get starting salary's of 30k?


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